Archive for the ‘Viruses’ Category

All His Symptoms Pointed Toward the Flu. But the Test Was Negative. RMSF in Connecticut

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/17/magazine/flu-symptoms-diagnosis-infection.html

All His Symptoms Pointed Toward the Flu. But the Test Was Negative.

CreditCreditIllustration by Andreas Samuelsson

 

“I think I’m losing this battle,” the 58-year-old man told his wife one Saturday night nearly a year ago.

While she was at the theater — they’d bought the tickets months earlier — he had to crawl up the stairs on his hands and knees to get to bed. Terrible bone-shaking chills racked him, despite the thick layer of blankets. The chills were followed by sudden blasts of internal heat and drenching sweats that made him kick off the covers — only to haul them back up as the cycle repeated itself.

“I need to go to the E.R.,” he told his wife. He’d been there three times already. They’d give him intravenous fluids and send him home with the diagnosis of a viral syndrome. He would start to feel better soon, he was told. But he didn’t.

This all began nine days before. That first day he called in sick to his job as a physical therapist. He felt feverish and achy, as if he had the flu. He decided to drink plenty of fluids, take it easy and go back to work the next day. But the next day he felt even worse. That’s when the fever and chills really kicked in. He was alternating between acetaminophen and ibuprofen, but the fever never let up. He’d started sleeping in the guest room because his sweat was soaking the sheets, and his chills shook the bed, waking his wife.

After three days of this, he made his first visit to the Yale New Haven Hospital emergency room. He was already taking antibiotics. Several weekends earlier, he developed a red, swollen elbow and went to an urgent-care center, where he was started on one antibiotic for a presumed infection. He took it for 10 days, but his elbow was still killing him. He went back to urgent care, where he was started on a broader-spectrum drug, which he had nearly finished. Now his elbow was fine. It was the rest of his body that ached as if he had the flu.

But at the hospital, his flu swab was negative. So was his chest X-ray. It was probably just a virus, he was told. He should take it easy until it passed. And come back if he got any worse.

The next day his fever spiked above 105. He went again to the E.R. It was a mob scene — crowded with people who, like him, appeared to have the flu. It would be hours before he could be seen, he was told, because they already knew he didn’t have it. Discouraged, he went home to bed. He went back the next morning after a nurse called to say the E.R. was more manageable.

He might not have the flu, he thought, but he was sure he had something. But the E.R. doctor didn’t know what. He didn’t have chest pain or shortness of breath. No cough, no headache, no rash, no abdominal pain, no urinary symptoms. He felt weak but no longer achy. His heart was beating hard and fast, but otherwise his exam was fine. His white count was low — which was a little strange. White blood cells are expected to increase with an acute infection. Still, a virus can cause white counts to drop. His platelets — the tiny blood fragments that form clots — were also low. That can also be seen in viral infections, but it was less common.

The E.R. staff sent the abnormal blood results to the patient’s primary-care provider and told the patient to follow up with him. He’d been trying get in to see him for days, but the doctor’s schedule was full. When he called again, he was told that the soonest he could be seen was the following week.

The patient asked the doctor to order blood tests to look for an infection in his blood. And could they also test him for tick-borne infections? This was Connecticut, after all. He dragged himself to the lab and then waited for his doctor to call with the results. The call never came. In his mind, he fired his doctor. He’d been sick for over a week, and the doctor’s office couldn’t arrange an appointment, and they couldn’t even call him with the lab results for the test he had to ask for in the first place.

That Sunday morning after the man’s wife had been to the theater, he went once more to the emergency room. It was brought to the attention of the physician assistant on duty that the man had been there several times before and had lab abnormalities. She ordered a bunch of blood tests — looking for everything from H.I.V. to mono. She ordered another chest X-ray and started him on broad-spectrum antibiotics, as well as doxycycline, an antibiotic often used for tick-borne infections. He was given Tylenol for his fever and admitted to the hospital. As he was preparing to leave the emergency department, a new flu test came back positive. He was pretty sure he didn’t have it; he’d never heard of a flu being this bad for this long. But if he could stay in the hospital, where someone could monitor him, he was happy to take Tamiflu.

The lab called again the next day to say that the test had been read incorrectly; he did not have the flu. By then other results started to come in. It wasn’t an infection in his elbow. He didn’t have H.I.V.; he didn’t have mono or Lyme; he didn’t have any of the other respiratory viruses that, along with the worse influenza outbreak in years, had filled up so much of the hospital.

CreditIllustration by Andreas Samuelsson

Yet after a couple of days, the patient began to feel better. His fever came down. The shaking chills disappeared. His white count and platelets edged up. It was clear he was recovering, but from what? More blood tests were ordered, and an infectious-disease specialist consulted.

Gabriel Vilchez, the infectious-disease specialist in training, reviewed the chart and examined the patient. He thought that the patient most likely had a tick-borne infection. The hospital had sent off blood to test for the usual suspects in the Northeast: Lyme, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis. Except for the Lyme test, which was negative, none of the results had come back yet. Vilchez considered that given the patient’s symptoms — and his response to the doxycycline — it would turn out that he’d have one of them.

And yet, the results for tick-borne infections were negative. Vilchez thought about other tick-borne diseases that are not on the usual panel. The most likely was Rocky Mountain spotted fever (R.M.S.F.). The name is a misnomer: R.M.S.F. is much more common in the Smoky Mountains than the Rocky Mountains, and the spotted-fever part, the rash, is not seen in all cases. It’s unusual to acquire the infection in Connecticut but not unheard-of. Vilchez sent off blood to be tested for R.M.S.F. The following day, the patient felt well enough to go home. A couple of days later, he got a call. He had Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

Why did the diagnosis take so long? The patient had an unusual infection. But perhaps the bigger issue was that he was one of many patients in the emergency room with flulike symptoms in the midst of a flu epidemic. Under those circumstances, the question for the staff simply becomes: Does he have the flu? When the answer is no, doctors tend to move on to the next very sick patient in line. It’s hard to get back to the question of what the nonflu patient does have.

For the patient, recovery has been tough. Though the antibiotic helped with the acute symptoms, it took months before he had the stamina to resume his usual patient load at work. He feels that the illness brought him as close to dying as he had ever been. Indeed, Rocky Mountain spotted fever is one of the most dangerous of all the tick-borne infections, with a mortality rate as high as 5 percent even with current antibiotics.

One thing he was certain about, however: He needed a new primary-care doctor. And he got one.

Lisa Sanders, M.D., is a contributing writer for the magazine and the author of “Every Patient Tells a Story: Medical Mysteries and the Art of Diagnosis.” If you have a solved case to share with Dr. Sanders, write her at Lisa.Sandersmd@gmail.com.

________________

**Comment**

This is playing out all over the world.  He was one of the lucky ones to finally get an accurate diagnosis.

It is interesting; however, that they are quick to state he doesn’t have the other tick-borne infections when the testing for all of them misses over half of all cases.  Once they gave him doxy, they should have retested him.  This is called a “provocation test” and is used by many LLMD’s (Lyme literate doctors) as they’ve learned this often finally shows an active infection(s) due to the ability of the body to NOW see the pathogens in the blood stream allowing antibodies to be made and picked up by the tests.

RMSF is a nasty beast on it’s own; however, this man should be monitored over time.  If symptoms come back or new ones show up, TBI’s should be suspected.

It’s also a mind boggler how in Connecticut of all places, TBI’s wouldn’t be the FIRST thing medical practitioners think of.  It’s literally ground zero.  

Please know RMSF IS IN WISCONSIN and is on the move:   https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/07/10/first-rmsf-death-in-wisconsin/

More on RMSF:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/09/14/rocky-mountain-spotted-fever-rmsf/

It’s also been found to be spread by the common brown dog tick:

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/08/16/new-tick-causes-epidemic-of-rmsf/  It’s usually spread by the American dog tick and the closely related Rocky Mountain wood tick. But in recent years the bacterial infection has also been spread by the brown dog tick — a completely different species…The researchers were investigating an epidemic of the infection that broke out in the border town of Mexicali starting in 2008. It’s already sickened at least 4,000 people, according to Mexican government estimates. Several hundred have died, and at least four people have died in the U.S. after crossing the border, according to this report and others.

“I was absolutely startled,” Foley said in an interview.

The people who had been sickened in Mexicali had a heavy load of the infectious agent in their blood — something that had not been seen in past outbreaks.
The epidemic is worrisome because the brown dog tick is more likely to bite people and it adapts easily to living in a house, as opposed to living on wild animals, the researchers said.

“The Rocky Mountain spotted fever epidemic in Mexicali has not been contained and may be spreading to other parts of Baja California and into the United States,” the team wrote.

And now it’s possible that for some reason, the infection the brown dog tick transmits is more virulent, Foley said.

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/06/10/two-deaths-from-rmsf-indiana-has-tbis/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2015/08/13/severe-case-of-rmsf-had-to-remove-patients-arms-and-legs/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/10/21/mom-got-rocky-mountain-spotted-fever-while-picking-pumpkins/  “When you go to these pumpkin patches and petting zoos and all those fun fall activities, wear pants, long socks and shoes!”
“Make sure you check for tics! This was me 2 years ago after being bit by a tick and contracting Rocky Mountain spotted fever at a pumpkin patch,” she continued. “I couldn’t walk, my whole body was in pain, my hair fell out, and I almost died.”

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/06/12/georgia-mom-warns-others-after-son-contracts-rocky-mountain-spotted-fever-after-tick-bite/  “This has been a horribly scary experience for our family. I’m thankful that I did my own research and brought it to my doctors attention. So don’t EVER be afraid to be an advocate for your child or yourself when it comes to things like this!” McNair continued, adding that “doctors are humans and have to figure out the puzzle just like the rest of us do!”

Wiser words were never spoken.

P.s. Regarding the red, swollen elbow…..

My journey was similar with the same issue in both my elbow and knee in the middle of January in Wisconsin.  I was told, and I promise I didn’t make this up, that I had “Washer Woman’s Knee,” and “Barstool elbow.”  

I kid you not.

Now, first, I use a mop and rarely get on my knees.  Second, I assure you, I’m not sitting at the bar and have NO reason to have a red, swollen, excruciatingly painful elbow.

Effective tick borne illness treatment completely ameliorated both conditions once I was finally diagnosed with Lyme/MSIDS.  For that exciting journey, that continues to this day, go here:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/02/24/pcos-lyme-my-story/

For effective Lyme treatment:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/02/13/lyme-disease-treatment/

Please remember, Lyme is the rock star we all know by name.  There are many, many other players involved and people are often coinfected.  Mainstream medicine has yet to accept and deal with this very real fact.

 

 

 

 

 

Rise in Acute Flaccid Myelitis Cases and the Link To Vaccinations

Polio-Like Condition May Be On The Rise In U.S. | NBC Nightly News

NBC News

Published on Oct 8, 2018
Health officials are on alert for cases of Acute Flaccid Myelitis, a rare complication linked to a common virus. Symptoms can include sudden limb weakness, drooping eyelids or face, trouble swallowing, and slurred speech.
Within a week, Quentin Hill went from being an active seven-year-old to a hospital bed. Diagnosed with a rare polio-like illness that at least five other kids in Minnesota now also have.
Doctors are telling you this is something we don’t know much about so there’s no known cure. 
https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/11/07/connection-of-acute-flaccid-myelitis-and-vaccinations/  The connection between vaccination and paralysis has been known since the 40’s and 50’s and was written about in The Lancet by Stephen Mawdsley in an article titled, “Polio Provocation: Solving a Mystery With the Help of History.” Mawdsley states:
“The application of epidemiological surveillance and statistical methods enabled researchers to trace the steady rise in polio incidence along with the expansion of immunization programs for diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus. A report that emerged from Guy’s and Evelina Hospitals, London, in 1950, found that 17 cases of polio paralysis developed in the limb injected with pertussis or tetanus inoculations. Results published by Australian doctor Bertram McCloskey also showed a strong association between injections and polio paralysis. Meanwhile, in the USA, public health researchers in New York and Pennsylvania reached similar conclusions.Clinical evidence, derived from across three continents, had established a theory that required attention.”
So what happened to this theory that piercing the skin during injection drives the polio virus into deep tissue where it then enters the central nervous system where it ultimately leads to paralysis and even death?
Good question.
The theory was essentially proven in 1998 in an article titled, “Mechanism of Injury-Provoked Poliomyelitis,” in the Journal of Virology. Researchers state:
“Skeletal muscle injury is known to predispose its sufferers to neurological complications of concurrent poliovirus infections. This phenomenon, labeled ‘provocation poliomyelitis,’ continues to cause numerous cases of childhood paralysis due to the administration of unnecessary injections to children in areas where poliovirus is endemic. Recently, it has been reported that intramuscular injections may also increase the likelihood of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis in recipients of live attenuated poliovirus vaccines. We have studied this important risk factor for paralytic polio in an animal system for poliomyelitis and have determined the pathogenic mechanism linking intramuscular injections and provocation poliomyelitis.Skeletal muscle injury induces retrograde axonal transport of poliovirus and thereby facilitates viral invasion of the central nervous system and the progression of spinal cord damage. The pathogenic mechanism of provocation poliomyelitis may differ from that of polio acquired in the absence of predisposing factors.”
The virus associated with the recent hospitalizations is Enterovirus D68, which is not polio per se, but is very similar and is in the same family of enteroviruses. Doctor Alan S. Cunningham, MD, a retired pediatrician wrote about his fear of the possibility of provocation of a polio-like virus due to vaccination in The BMJ in 2015:
“Since August 2, 2014, our Centers for Disease Control has received reports of 107 cases of ‘acute flaccid myelitis’ (AFM), a polio-like illness in children in 34 states. During the same interval there have been 1153 cases of respiratory illnesses associated with enterovirus D-68 (CIDRAP News 1/16/15. CDC update 1/15/15. Catherine Saint Louis, NY Times 1/13/15). AFM affects motor neurons in spinal cord gray matter, resulting in asymmetrical limb weakness; 34% of patients have cranial nerve motor dysfunction. Median age of patients is 7.6 years/range: 5 months-20 years (MMWR 63: 1243–January 9, 2015). So far only one child has fully recovered. EV-D68 is a suspected cause but, thus far, no viruses have been found in the spinal fluid of patients, and only a minority have had an antecedent illness associated with EV-D68. Case-control studies are planned to look for clues, but presently AFM is a mystery disease of unknown cause. It is taboo to suggest a role for vaccines, but some old-timers remember “provocation poliomyelitis” or “provocation paralysis.” This is paralytic polio following intramuscular injections, typically with vaccines. PP was most convincingly documented by Austin Bradford Hill and J. Knowelden during the 1949 British polio epidemic when the risk of paralytic polio was increased 20-fold among children who had received the DPT injection (BMJ 2:1–July 1, 1950). Similar observations were made by Greenberg and colleagues in New York City; their literature review cited suspected cases as far back as 1921 (Am J Public Health 42:142–Feb.1952). I first became aware of PP 10 years ago while browsing through “Krugman’s Infectious Disease of Children” (page 128 of the 2004 edition). AFM may result from a direct virus attack on the spinal cord, or by an immune attack triggered by a virus, or by something else.If a polio-like virus is circulating in the U.S., the possibility of its provocation by one or more vaccines has to be considered.”
Polio provocation resurfaced in the 80’s when vaccination programs in developing countries increased in tandem with more children becoming paralyzed.

The US government chose to continue vaccinating and stated,
“any possible doubts, whether or not well founded, about the safety of the vaccine cannot be allowed to exist in view of the need to assure that the vaccine will continue to be used to the maximum extent consistent with the nation’s public health objectives.”
This is important information to consider for MSIDS patients, since our immune systems are compromised and viruses often play a role in our illness, we need to consider the very probable connection with provoked viruses by vaccines along with our other tick borne infections.
For more information on vaccines, please read: https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2015/06/19/a-word-on-vaccines/
https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2015/08/12/connecting-dots-mycoplasma/ Written by the Office of Medical and Scientific Justice and substantiating this further: http://www.whale.to/vaccine/cantwell2.html “One factor common to all the troops is that they were given experimental and potentially dangerous drugs and vaccines employed to protect them against Iraqi chemical and biowarfare agents. As early as December 1990, there were warnings about using our servicemen as medical guinea pigs. In an unprecedented legal decision, the FDA allowed the Pentagon to give unapproved drugs and vaccines without requiring consent of the soldiers. Claiming security reasons, the Pentagon also refused to identify the types or the number of drugs and injections they forced the troops to take… Soldiers who rejected the injections were given them forcibly. Physicians who refused to cooperate with the military’s experimental vaccine program were treated harshly.”

PANS/PANDAS Awareness

Approx 4 Min

Excerpt from the documentary “My Kid Is not Crazy.”

PANS/PANDAS Awareness Day was yesterday but I didn’t get the memo until today.  🙂

While disturbing at the beginning, look how antibiotics made all the difference.  Less than four minutes of film that shows how devastating PANS can be.

How many children are slipping through the cracks and are being labeled “mentally ill?”

A prominent Lyme literate doctor in Wisconsin states that approximately 80% of his Autistic, and PANS/PANDAS patients have Lyme/MSIDS.  

PANDAS_PANS_Infographic_V0.2

Please note the estimate that 1 in 200 children in the USA are affected by it.

You as a family member, friend, or alert medical professional have the ability to share this information when you suspect it.  Speak up.  These kids need our help.

For more:

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/12/01/guidelines-for-treating-pans-its-real/  Despite the fact that published diagnostic guidelines for PANS/PANDAS were created in 2015, but some physicians still feel it’s not legit.

Physicians need to take this disease seriously.

According to Margo Thienemann, MD, clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Stanford, and the lead author of the portion of the guidelines that address psychiatric and behavioral interventions, treatment is at least tri-part:  

  • if infection is present, treat the infection
  • treat close contacts who may be exposing the child to infection
  • treat inflammation, which is thought to cause the brain symptoms

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/10/08/misdiagnosed-how-children-with-treatable-medical-issues-are-mistakenly-labeled-as-mentally-ill/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/06/30/child-with-lymemsidspans-told-by-doctors-she-made-it-all-up/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/07/28/stories-of-pandas/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/10/01/panspandas-steroids-autoimmune-disease-lymemsids-the-need-for-medical-collaboration/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/09/26/more-awareness-needed-for-childrens-neurological-conditions/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/09/05/pans-autism-the-immune-system-an-interview-with-expert-neurologist-dr-richard-frye/

 

 

 

 

Updates and News From Russell Labs – Wisconsin

http://labs.russell.wisc.edu/wisconsin-ticks/

Updates

August, 2018: Nymphal deer ticks are less abundant but still active in Wisconsin right now. About 20-25% of nymphs are infected with the Lyme spirochete. Overall, 2018 has been normal in terms of tick numbers.

Live in Wisconsin and want your tick identified?

 

Take a picture of ticks on your phone and go here:  https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3s1wBopYCcW0lzT

Wisconsin ticks:  http://labs.russell.wisc.edu/wisconsin-ticks/

Go to link for pictures and information on each.  There are 4 ticks listed including the Lone Star Tick, which was until recently considered a Southern tick but is here as well.  Wisconsin had its first RMSF death, transmitted by the Lone Star Tick, recently:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/07/10/first-rmsf-death-in-wisconsin/

There is also a tab titled “Tick-Borne Diseases.”  Go to link to read about them.  They give WI stats as well.  Please remember ALL the numbers are low as many go unreported:

  • Lyme (Bb or Bm)
  • Borrelia miyamotoi (relapsing fever)
  • Anasplasmosis
  • Ehrlichia muris eauclairensis (EML)
  • Babesiosis
  • Powassan virus/deertick virus
  • Ehrlichia chaffeensis
  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

__________________

A few points stick out to me:

  1. Please take pictures of these ticks & send them in so we finally have an accurate record.  They are asking us for help so let’s give it.  It will only help us in the end.  Flood them with ticks!
  2. Baronella didn’t make the list, yet nearly everyone I work with has it.  WHY?  Because while Bart has been found in ticks, it hasn’t been proven conclusively they transmit.  Bart is a nasty, nasty bug and alone can kill you.  Coupled with Lyme it can make you want to die.
  3. For viruses, they only list Powassan when many more are on record including Heartland and Bourbon (unfortunately they aren’t mandatory to report).  They know Heartland is transmitted by the Lone Star tick but I couldn’t even find the tick supposedly responsible for Bourbon, although it’s a killer:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/07/01/one-tick-bite-could-put-you-at-risk-for-at-least-6-different-diseases/
  4. The lack of data is glaring.  Seriously.  Glaring.  Zika makes front page news here and our mosquitoes can’t even carry it.  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/03/13/wed-nite-the-lab-talk-on-mosquitoes-ticks-disease/  There were only 46 cases of Zika in the U.S. in 2018 – ALL due to travelers returning from affected areas.The CDC “estimates” that there are 300,000 NEW Lyme Disease cases annually in the U.S.  Anyone see a disparity here between Zika and Lyme?  (Other tick-borne diseases aren’t even on the radar yet)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Study Shows Tick Infection & Transmission Potential for Both DTV & WNV

https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/vbz.2017.2224#utm_source=ETOC&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=vbz

Generation of a Lineage II Powassan Virus (Deer Tick Virus) cDNA Clone: Assessment of Flaviviral Genetic Determinants of Tick and Mosquito Vector Competence

Kenney Joan L. , Anishchenko Michael , Hermance Meghan , Romo Hannah , Chen Ching-I , Thangamani Saravanan , and Brault Aaron C.
Published Online:1 Jul 2018https://doi.org/10.1089/vbz.2017.2224

Abstract

The Flavivirus genus comprises a diverse group of viruses that utilize a wide range of vertebrate hosts and arthropod vectors. The genus includes viruses that are transmitted solely by mosquitoes or vertebrate hosts as well as viruses that alternate transmission between mosquitoes or ticks and vertebrates. Nevertheless, the viral genetic determinants that dictate these unique flaviviral host and vector specificities have been poorly characterized. In this report, a cDNA clone of a flavivirus that is transmitted between ticks and vertebrates (Powassan lineage II, deer tick virus [DTV]) was generated and chimeric viruses between the mosquito/vertebrate flavivirus, West Nile virus (WNV), were constructed. These chimeric viruses expressed the prM and E genes of either WNV or DTV in the heterologous (from one species to another) nonstructural (NS) backbone. Recombinant chimeric viruses rescued from cDNAs were characterized for their capacity to grow in vertebrate and arthropod (mosquito and tick) cells as well as for in vivo vector competence in mosquitoes and ticks.

Results demonstrated that the NS elements were insufficient to impart the complete mosquito or tick growth phenotypes of parental viruses; however, these NS genetic elements did contribute to a 100- and 100,000-fold increase in viral growth in vitro in tick and mosquito cells, respectively. Mosquito competence was observed only with parental WNV, while infection and transmission potential by ticks were observed with both DTV and WNV-prME/DTV chimeric viruses. These data indicate that NS genetic elements play a significant, but not exclusive, role for vector usage of mosquito- and tick-borne flaviviruses.

________________

**Comment**

I’m no microbiologist and without the full article and better understanding of what this NS backbone is, 

The study shows 4 things:

  1.  The NS elements gave a 100 fold “test tube” increase in viral growth in tick cells.  These organisms are extremely fastidious and difficult to study in a lab.  It’s even tougher to figure out how this plays out in the human body.
  2. INFECTION & TRANSMISSION potential by ticks was observed with both DTV and WNV.  Read that sentence again.
  3. Why didn’t this make the news?
  4. Mosquitoes are nasty but ticks are a whole other monster.  Mosquito research gets all the money.  Why?

http://www.dutchessny.gov/CountyGov/Departments/Legislature/2017Auerbach.pdf  This pdf by Lyme Advocate Jill Auerbach shows that while there were only 5,700 cases of WNV in 2012, research dollars were $29 million, whereas, Lyme cases in 2012 were 312,000 but received only $25 million.  While the number of the infected continue to soar the research dollars for Lyme are radically reduced in successive years:

Disease New Cases (annual) NIH Funding
 

Hepatitis C 2012

 

1,300

 

$112 million

West Nile Virus 2012

5,700

$29 million

HIV/AIDS 2012

56,000

$3 billion (11% total NIH budget)

Influenza 2012

73,000

$251 million

Lyme disease 2012

312,000

$25 million

Lyme disease 2013

363,070

$20 million

*Lyme disease 2004             198,040                                  $34.4 million

Disease

      New Cases 2015

CDC funding 2016

Lyme Disease

           380,690  (10 x 38,069)
2016 numbers not yet available

 $10 million

This does NOT include other Tick-borne diseases

Houston, we have a problem.

 

 

 

It’s Time to Find the “Alzheimer’s Germ”

https://alzgerm.org/whitepaper

It’s Time to Find the “Alzheimer’s Germ”

Full White Paper

By Leslie C. Norins, M.D., Ph.D.

If a mystery disease is killing 303 people per day, and ¬there’s a chance it’s caused by an infection, aren’t all government germ detectives and labs in full investigative mode, 24/7? Of course—unless it’s Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Which it is.

U.S. deaths in 2015 (most recent year available) were 110,561. That’s 303 dying per day. It’s now the fifth leading cause of death. Cases are up 89 percent since 2000, says the Alzheimer’s Association. There’s no cure or preventive. And Congress says care of Alzheimer’s patients costs $153 billion a year.

 

Experts Still Worried About This New Tick Since it Doesn’t Carry Lyme Disease…..Yet

https://www.deseretnews.com/article/900029129/experts-still-worried-about-this-new-tick-since-it-doesnt-carry-lyme-disease-yet.html

Experts still worried about this new tick since it doesn’t carry Lyme disease … yet

Stock image

Extreme close-up photo of adult female deer tick crawling on white skin

SALT LAKE CITY — An Asian tick invading the United States continues to befuddle experts who remain unsure of its capabilities.

The longhorned tick remains a mystery for many medical health professionals, according to The Daily Beast.

The tick doesn’t seem to carry Lyme disease, unlike its cousins, which include the black-legged tick.

Experts are rather familiar with the black-legged ticks, understanding its host preference, travel patterns and environment.

But they still remain curious about this new tick.

Rutgers entomologist Andrea Egizi told The Daily Beast that a colleague told her the new tick “didn’t look like anything he’d ever seen before.”

She said she took samples of the tick and ran them through DNA tests.

“It was a species I’d never heard of before,” Egizi told The Daily Beast.

No one’s sure how it arrived in the U.S., either. Sam Telford, a professor at Tufts, said it likely came from birds.

The New York Times first reported on the new tick earlier this month, saying it has caused concern among public health experts because it doesn’t carry any human diseases.

However, in Asia, the species can carry a virus that kills 15 percent of its victims, according to The New York Times.

The longhorned ticks “can multiply rapidly and suck so much blood from a young animal that it dies. The ticks bloat up like fat raisins until their tiny legs are barely able to support them,” The New York Times reported.

The tick has already popped on the East Coast. The North Carolina Department of Agriculture released a statement that called the tick “an aggressive biter and frequently builds intense infestations on animals causing great stress … and blood loss.”

Dr. Rachel Levine, Pennsylvania secretary of health, told The Pocono Record that people should be cautious when outside if they want to avoid all ticks.

“Ticks can be found in your own backyard, so it is essential to wear long sleeves and pants, use insect repellent containing DEET to help keep you safe from ticks and the diseases they carry. It is also important to check yourself and your pets for ticks, as pets can bring ticks indoors.”

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For more:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/07/19/rutgers-racing-to-contain-asian-longhorned-tick/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/08/08/an-invasive-new-tick-is-spreading-in-the-u-s/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/05/27/study-conforms-permethrin-causes-ticks-to-drop-off-clothing/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/04/03/fire-good-news-for-tick-reduction/