Archive for the ‘mosquitoes’ Category

Nootkatone Against Ticks

Approx. 1:30

Approx. 5:00

Nootkatone on a treated finger vs an untreated finger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.evolva.com/nootkatone-flavor/

Nootkatone kills ticks and is safe for humans. Additionally, a test was done that demonstrated that with soap containing nootkatone washed ticks off of mice. Therefore, as a personal care product, such as a soap, it could be very successful in preventing Lyme and almost all of the TBD pathogens with a simple evening shower or bath.

It could be successful because:

1. No new habits need to be formed, people already use soap and shampoo.
2. It is simple to use.
3. It would be relatively inexpensive.
4. It would be safe.
5. It would be better adhered to than tick checks and you don’t have to see them.

For more:  https://www.xconomy.com/san-diego/2011/04/28/nootkatone-so-a-peeling-in-grapefruit-is-repellent-to-mosquitoes-and-ticks/   When I profiled Allylix last summer, CEO Carolyn Fritz explained how the San Diego startup was using genetically engineered yeast and proprietary fermentation technology to produce specialized “aroma chemicals” for the $1.9 billion flavor and fragrance market. The company’s first product was a compound with a keen grapefruit taste and smell called nootkatone, a flavor enhancer previously extracted from grapefruit peels through a costly process…..Now, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are pushing to develop nootkatone as a completely natural insect repellent, according to a recent report from National Public Radio.

 

 

Bb Can Cause Infectious Myelopathy

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29613895
Continuum (Minneap Minn). 2018 Apr;24(2, Spinal Cord Disorders):441-473. doi: 10.1212/CON.0000000000000597.

Infectious Myelopathies.

Grill MF.

Abstract
PURPOSE OF REVIEW:
This article reviews bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic pathogens associated with myelopathy. Infectious myelopathies may be due to direct infection or parainfectious autoimmune-mediated mechanisms; this article focuses primarily on the former.
RECENT FINDINGS:
Some microorganisms exhibit neurotropism for the spinal cord (eg, enteroviruses such as poliovirus and flaviviruses such as West Nile virus), while others are more protean in neurologic manifestations (eg, herpesviruses such as varicella-zoster virus), and others are only rarely reported to cause myelopathy (eg, certain fungal and parasitic infections). Individuals who are immunocompromised are at increased risk of disseminated infection to the central nervous system. Within the last few years, an enterovirus D68 outbreak has been associated with cases of acute flaccid paralysis in children, and emerging Zika virus infection has been concurrent with cases of acute flaccid paralysis due to Guillain-Barré syndrome, although cases of myelitis have also been reported. Associated pathogens differ by geographic distribution, with myelopathies related to Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme disease) and West Nile virus more commonly seen in the United States and parasitic infections encountered more often in Latin America, Southeast Asia, and Africa. Characteristic CSF and MRI patterns have been identified with many of these infections.
SUMMARY:
A myriad of pathogens are associated with infectious myelopathies. Host factors, geographic distribution, clinical features, CSF profiles, and MRI findings can assist in formulating the differential diagnosis and ultimately guide management.

_______________

**Comment**

Myelopathy is a neurologic deficit related to the spinal cord which can be caused by trauma (spinal cord injury) or inflammation (myelitis).  Inflammation can be caused by numerous things including pathogens such as Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), the causative agent of Lyme Disease, as well as numerous viruses that can also be a part of the Lyme/MSIDS symptom picture which can be transmitted directly from ticks or activated due to the reaction of the body to the tick bite.  Much research is needed in this particular area.

Myelopathy is typically a clinical diagnosis with patients complaining of weakness, clumsiness, muscle atrophy, sensory deficits, bowel/bladder symptoms, sexual dysfunction, altered tons, spasticity, and hyperreflexia among other symptoms.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Myelopathy  Treatment depends upon the underlying cause.  If infectious, pathogen specific antibiotics, and/or things to reduce inflammation are in order.

Personal response:  While I was not diagnosed with myelopathy specifically, one of my hallmark symptoms was spinal and occipital pain.  After ruling out Chiari:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/04/02/chiari/ and regularly seeing an upper cervical chiropractor for structural malalignment, MSM helped me tremendously.  Please read about MSM here:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/03/02/dmso-msm-for-lyme-msids/

Make sure to discuss all treatment options with your health care provider.

 

 

Wed Nite @ The Lab – Talk on Mosquitoes, Ticks, & Disease


Approx. 1:24:00

Wednesday Nite @ The Lab
Published on Jan 16, 2018

“Susan Paskewitz’s talk will focus on the activities of the newly created Midwest Center of Excellence for Vector-Borne Disease. The center was established in 2017 as a response to the increasing rate of human illness caused by tick and mosquito-transmitted diseases in the region, including Lyme disease and West Nile encephalitis. In addition to these familiar problems, new ticks, mosquitoes, and pathogens have been discovered. Solving these issues will require a new generation of trained vector biologists, cooperation and collaboration among public-health professionals and scientists, and creative and innovative research to reduce human and insect contact.”

About the Speaker

Paskewitz is the director of the Midwest Center of Excellence for Vector-Borne Disease and the chair of the Department of Entomology at UW–Madison. Her research focuses on the ecology, epidemiology, and management of ticks and mosquitoes. She teaches classes in global health, medical and veterinary entomology, and the One Health concept, during which she enjoys working with undergraduate and graduate students who seek to gain experience in public health, infectious disease, and vector-biology research. Paskewitz earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Southern Illinois University–Carbondale and her doctorate at the University of Georgia–Athens.

___________________

Highlights:

4:45 Believe it or not, Wisconsin used to have cases of Malaria.

Zika, discovered in 1947, wasn’t even in our hemisphere. Very few people infected until 2007 when there were 13-14 cases. 2015 it showed up in Brazil. First time a mosquito spread disease that is also sexually transmitted. A medical entomologist felt he gave it to his wife and then wrote a paper on it.

(I guess we need a medical entomologist to infect his/her wife with Lyme/MSIDS so that a paper can be written to prove sexual transmission…..) Please see:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/02/26/transplacental-transmission-fetal-damage-with-lyme-disease/ and https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/02/24/pcos-lyme-my-story/

UW did a lot of work on Zika. Cases in the U.S. occurred when people traveled abroad, became infected, were bit by mosquitoes here, and then spread from there. Only 63 infected people in 2016, 9 more in 2017.

Do we have the mosquitoes that can pick up the virus and transmit it? The Yellow Fever mosquito is the one transmitting Zika. The mosquito is here in U.S. but NOT in WI.  The Asian Tiger mosquito is a secondary vector that transmits the same viruses but not as well. Has a wider distribution and is a daytime feeder.

She looked in all the records – couldn’t find the Asian Tiger in Wisconsin.  It is found in Illinois and Indiana.  However, since that time they have laid many traps and found the Asian Tiger Mosquito here but she doesn’t feel they are abundant or wide spread.  She also feels they won’t survive our winters but experiments are in progress.  Females bite, lay eggs in wet aquatic spots, as larvae need water to grow.

(The same sort of diligence needs to happen in the world of Lyme.  For instance, borrelia has been found in other insects, but entomologists downplay it and say numbers are small.  This is a great example of how Lyme is treated differently then other diseases that are big money-makers for researchers.)

25:32 The Lone star tick has popped up in a number of places in WI – she doesn’t feel they will survive our winters.

Spent a lot of time talking about mosquito issues happening down South.

She admits the Center was created due to Zika.  

(Don’t be shocked when all the research dollars go to Zika & not tick borne illness despite the much higher prevalence of TBI’s in WI)

Wisconsin has cases of West Nile, La Crosse Virus, and Jamestown Canyon Virus – which has increased human cases – they don’t know why.

They are working on a bacterial based topical repellent.  Also working on using fish and copepods to eat mosquitos at the larval stage.

38:00 TICKS

Ticks transmit Lyme Disease – a lot and it’s not just in the North. Could pick it up anywhere in Wisconsin.

Please see:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/10/06/remembering-dr-masters-the-rebel-for-lyme-patients-who-took-on-the-cdc-single-handedly/

Map showing Deer tick population between 1907-1996 and 1907-2015 –

Our entire state is infested.  

Sky rocket of LD in WI CONFIRMED.  She admits the CDC says the cases are hugely underestimated – more like 30,000 cases per year in WI.

WI is a hotspot for newly emerging TBI – Anaplasma, Ehrlichia muris, borrelia miyamotoi (relapsing fever), Babesia divergens (in Michigan but Paskowitz feels it’s probably here too).

Anaplasma seeing 400-600 cases a year in WI.  Again, much underreporting.

44:00 talks about tick distribution maps.

Please see:  http://steveclarknd.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/The-Confounding-Debate-Over-Lyme-Disease-in-the-South-DiscoverMagazine.com_.pdf (go to page 6 and read about Speilman’s maps which are faulty but have ruled like the Iron Curtain, and have been used to keep folks from being diagnosed and treated)

They are working on a way for public to take pictures of ticks, send it to the lab and get answers.

Trying to reduce the risk….they think it’s the nymphs that do most of the transmission because they are tiny and we don’t feel them.

Larvae and nymphs love little rodents
Adults love adults, dogs, and deer

50:00 what we can do to stop LD

52:30 One experiment removed buckthorn – looked like a significant impact after first year but nothing after that.

53:20 tick tubes for micefound a decrease in host-seeking nymphs with this seen it three years running.

Trying to come up with a do it yourself toolkit to implement methods for tick control.

55:55 Working on the tick app – to pool info to show where we are picking up the ticks so education can be more targeted.

ends @ 58:30 then questions

Funding by:  CDC, NIH, USDA, WI Dept HEalth services, WI Dep Natural resources

 

 

 

 

 

Wolbachia-Laced Mosquitoes Being Released & Why Lyme/MSIDS Patients Might be Negatively Affected

 Inside Edition Published Feb. 11, 2018

https://www.naturalnews.com/2018-02-11-mosquitoes-infected-with-natural-bacteria-prevent-reproduction-released-in-miami.html

The Miami-Dade Country Mosquito Reduction Test Program, a collaboration between the University of Kentucky and biotech company MosquitoMate, is releasing lab-bred mosquitoes infected with Wolbachia into the wild to supposedly depopulate Aedes aegypti mosquitos that carry dengue fever, yellow fever, and Zika. They are conducting an initial test phase to see if it can become operational.

Wolbachia stops mosquitoes from reproducing.  The eggs die before they hatch.

Here are some potential problems:

  1. What if Wolbachia causes a mutation?
  2. Evidently, consent has not been given.  Humans live here.
  3. Dogs treated for Heart Worm have severe inflammation due to released Wolbachia in the blood stream
  4. Wolbachia enhances other pathogens

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/07/10/wolbachia-the-next-frankenstein/  Wolbachia, a Gram-negative bacterium of the family Rickettsiales first found in 1924 and in 60% of all the insects, including some mosquitoes, crustaceans, and nematodes (worms). It was largely unknown until the 90’s due to its evasion tactics.  It has been used in human diseases such as elephantiasis and River Blindness, both caused by filiarial nematodes.

Wolbachia’s favorite hosts are filarial nematodes and arthropods.

Here’s where it gets tricky.  It is commonly known that nematodes (worms) are often a part of the Lyme/MSIDS patient picture & explains the importance of the following animal study.

Dogs treated for heart worm (D. immitis) have trouble due to the heart worm medication causing Wolbachia to be released into the blood and tissues causing severe Inflammation in pulmonary artery endothelium which may form thrombi and interstitial inflammation. Wolbachia also activates pro inflammatory cytokines. Pets treated with tetracycline a month prior to heart worm treatment will kill some D. immitis as well as suppress worm production. When given after heart worm medication, it may decrease the inflammation from Wolbachia kill off.  http://www.critterology.com/articles/wolbachia-and-their-role-heartworm-disease-and-treatment
The words worms and inflammation should cause every Lyme/MSIDS patient to pause. Many of us are put on expensive anthelmintics like albendazole, ivermectin, Pin X, and praziquantel to get rid of worms and are told to avoid anything causing inflammation due to the fact we have enough of it already. We go on special anti-inflammatory diets and take systemic enzymes and herbs to try and lower inflammation. https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/04/22/systemic-enzymes/

Seems to me, many MSIDS/LYME patients when treated with anthelmintics, will have Wolbachia released into their blood and tissues causing wide spread inflammation, similarly to dogs.

And that’s not all.

According to a study by Penn State, mosquitoes infected with Wolbachia are more likely to become infected with West Nile – which will then be transmitted to humans.“This is the first study to demonstrate that Wolbachia can enhance a human pathogen in a mosquito,“ one researcher said. “The results suggest that caution should be used when releasing Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes into nature to control vector-borne diseases of humans.” “Multiple studies suggest that Wolbachia may enhance some Plasmodium parasites in mosquitoes, thus increasing the frequency of malaria transmission to rodents and birds,” he said. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140710141628.htm

So besides very probable wide spread inflammation, and that other diseases may become more prevalent due to Wolbachia laced mosquitoes, studies show Wolbachia enhances Malaria in mosquitos.

Lyme/MSIDS patients are often co-infected with Babesia, a malarial-like parasite that requires similar treatment and has been found to make Lyme (borrelia) much worse.

Lastly, with Brazil’s recent explosion of microcephaly, the introduction of yet another man-made intervention (Wolbachia laced mosquitos) should be considered in evaluating potential causes and cofactors. And while the CDC is bound and determined to blame the benign virus, Zika, there are numerous other factors that few are considering – as well as the synergistic effect of all the variables combined. Microcephaly could very well be a perfect storm of events.
https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/12/21/how-zika-got-the-blame/, https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/03/04/health-policy-recap/, https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/03/08/fixation-on-zikapolio/

I hate bugs as much as the next person, but careful long-term studies of Wolbachia are required here.

Hopefully it is evident that many man-made interventions have been introduced into the environment causing important health ramifications: Wolbachia laced mosquitoes and eggs, GMO mosquitoes including CRISPR, and in the case of Zika in Brazil, whole-cell pertussis vaccinations (DTap) for pregnant women up to 20 days prior to expected date of birth, a pyriproxyfen based pesticide applied by the State in Brazil on drinking water, as well as aerial sprays of the insect growth regulators Altosid and VectoBac (Aquabac, Teknar, and LarvX, along with 25 other Bti products registered for use in the U.S.) in New York (Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and The Bronx) to combat Zika. “We feel it’s critical that the scientific community consider the potential hazards of all off-target mutations caused by CRISPR, including single nucleotide mutations and mutations in non-coding regions of the genome … Researchers who aren’t using whole genome sequencing to find off-target effects may be missing potentially important mutations. Even a single nucleotide change can have a huge impact.http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/06/13/crispr-gene-editing-dangers.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art3&utm_campaign=20170613Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM147520&et_rid=2042753642

All of this is big, BIG business.

Is the introduction of Wolbachia another puzzle piece in the perfect storm of events causing or exacerbating human health issues?
The jury’s still out, but it’s not looking good – particularly for the chronically ill.

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2018/02/13/lab-made-mosquitoes-released-in-miami.aspx?  “If preventing Zika was their aim, government officials missed the boat on this one; although Miami-Dade County was previously designated as a Zika cautionary area, that designation was removed June 2, 2017.  No Zika virus disease cases have been reported with illness onset in 2018 in the U.S., while in 2017 there were only four cases of Zika virus reported that were presumably acquired via local mosquitoes (two in Florida and two in Texas).  There is a major push to combat mosquito-borne diseases in the continental U.S. with the use of lab-made and GE mosquitoes, even though in the U.S. mosquito-borne illnesses are not a grave threat, especially compared to other major public health crises like the opioid epidemic.”

And I will add the tick borne illness crisis, which truly is a pandemic.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lost Link – ALS & Lyme

https://huib.me/en/blog/item/92-the-lost-link-between-als-and-lyme-disease  by Huib Kraaijeveld, October 2017

The lost link between ALS and Lyme disease

Knowledge about emergent diseases normally increases over time. Lyme Disease seems to be an exception to this rule. Claims that governments and scientists made around 1990, seem to have been forgotten. This article explores the lost link between ALS and Lyme. ALS is also known as Motor Neurone Disorder (MND) or as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, after the famous Yankee baseball player who died from it in the 1940’s. It is still claimed there is no known cause nor cure for it. 

 

A few weeks ago I visited a friend to admire her new house. She wasn’t as happy as I’d expected. She told me that a good friend of hers (46) was just diagnosed with ALS. ALS is considered a progressive and lethal disease, without a known cure for it.

Two months earlier, her friend had sudden deterioration of her memory, impairment of cognitive function and lost the use of the muscles in one arm. I’m not medically trained myself, but found this to be a peculiar combination of symptoms for ‘ALS’.

Some clinical tests for other illnesses were checked off, no blood work was done and she was basically sent home to write her will and say goodbye to her young child and husband. Memory loss and the sudden inability to think straight were not included in the diagnosis process.

My friend asked me for some sources about a potential link between Lyme and ALS. I’d like to share these sources with you as well in this current article, as a timely example how knowledge can somehow be ‘forgotten’.

Media coverage

There is a specific reason to write this article now. This week, on October 18, a highly disputed broadcast by Zembla International called ‘deceit or Borrelia‘ seems to be repeated on Dutch TV.

It attacked a specialized German lab, using the edited stories of Danish Lyme patients, who could not get help in their own country.

The patients did not give their consent for the broadcast, and when they realized where the broadcast was heading, they found that they were unable to withdraw their cooperation. This led to a ‘counter’ documentary of their own making, which you can see below.

Tabitha, the first lady who you can see in this documentary, was also told that she would live another six months at most and should say goodbye to her young daughter. Her diagnosis was also ALS.

She found that Lyme was likely the cause of her deterioration in health, got treated for it and stopped the progression of the ‘ALS’. She’s still alive now, although hardly after the damage the original documentary had done to her care plan.

Differential diagnosis

A differential diagnosis is what specialists call ‘detective work’. Clinicians look for symptomatic and laboratory clues, have hunches, order testing and perform exams, and then rule diagnoses in or out, especially when one or more illnesses have similar symptoms or even lab findings.

Part of that detective work is simply doing diagnostics by way of treatment. If a patient does not respond to a treatment for a specific disease, too bad, but then you can exclude it. But if they do, great news! Wouldn’t you think, in case of a lethal condition?

Allan Sheppard’ story, which was featured by the BBC, tells another tale. After the UK medical system NHS kept him in Intensive Care for two years with alleged ‘ALS’ and refusing his daughter to get a Lyme test from another specialized German lab, he is now improving while being treated for Lyme. Despite the UK government trying to stop her.

The story of Eivind Markhus is even more sinister. After he was told he would die from ALS, he had an American lab test his blood and found Lyme to be the real cause of his problems. He also improved after initial treatment and the progression of his ALS symptoms stopped.

Yet instead of spending 150,000 dollar on Lyme treatments, he spent that amount on legal cases, because his Norwegian government forbade him to get treated. He lost both the lawsuit and his life.

Recently, a male Dutch ALS patient (34, with three little children), who had been previously tested – with the standard unreliable serological test – for Lyme in a so-called (ALS) ’Expert Center’, had to learn from a chronic Lyme patient and a Lyme Literate US doctor how to improve the diagnostics.

By buying antibiotics online in New Zealand and taking them for a few days, his body started to produce antibodies for Lyme. So suddenly the test was positive in another (Lyme) ‘Expert Center’, where they apparently don’t know how to do this.

He is now crowdfunding to undergo an experimental treatment, which his insurance refuses to cover as it is not considered ‘evidence based’.

The story of Dr. Martz, who is featured in the award-winning documentary ‘Under Our Skin’ is the icing on the cake. He was told he would die of ALS as well, but found out by coincidence that he actually had Lyme and a co-infection, was treated for both of them and recovered so much he could give lectures in 2011.

Ice buckets

A relationship between ALS / MND and Lyme makes sense, looking at the findings of the 1990 research that was published in the article ‘Immunological Reactivity against in Borrelia burgdorferi in Patients with Motor Neuron Disease’ by Halperin et al.

This study showed that in almost 50% of the 19 people diagnosed with ALS, Lyme was the cause. Once treated, several of these patients improved. In that same year, 1990, the CDC published its first definition about Lyme and described the complex, systemic, multi-symptom and sometimes devastating chronic disease experienced by many Lyme patients – then and still today.

Did anyone ever do a follow-up on this promising research? No. It was simply hidden away and Halperin chose to become a co-author of the 2006 IDSA Lyme Guidelines instead, which maintain that ‘Lyme is a mild disease that is hard to get, easy to treat and hardly ever becomes a chronic condition’. Any possible connection with ALS or any other of the serious and previously acknowledged debilitating or even deadly conditions was no longer mentioned. Any long-term health issues are reasoned away, using semantics rather than ‘evidence based’ science.

These 2006 IDSA Lyme Guidelines have become worldwide policy, even though they were removed from the National Guidelines Clearinghouse and named as a case of bad ‘evidence based’ guidelines by the Institute of Medicine in 2011. To this day, both the CDC and WHO wholeheartedly support them, regardless of the hundreds of scientific publications that dispute them.

Today, 27 years after the Halperin study, people with ALS are routinely not (properly) tested nor treated for Lyme. Instead, friends and families are encouraged to empty ice buckets over each other’s heads to collect money for new research for a new cure for ALS.

The patient stories mentioned above will simply be discarded as ‘anecdotical’ by both mainstream scientists, doctors and policymakers. So will the fact that Lou Gehrig actually owned a house in Old Lyme, Connecticut.

Yet, if these stories are not shared anyway, the knowledge in them will be lost and so is hope for other people like Eivind, Allan, Tabitha, my friend’s friend and their children.

Choices of media channels such as the BBC or Zembla are decisive which knowledge is made available to the public. I asked the editors of Zembla to reconsider broadcasting it again, but have not yet received a reply.

An intellectual ice bucket

Most of these diagnoses are simply words on a form, which either best fit the symptoms or simply fit the codes of the insurances. Almost all of them are based on clinical diagnoses only and can mean a life-sentence to the patients.

Yet they need to prove with 100% certainty that Lyme is the actual cause? How can they do so, with blood tests that produce over 500 times more false negatives than the current HIV tests? Even the ‘experts’ now state that they should no longer be used

The intellectual ice-bucket is that one disease (causative agent) can show up as many different ‘disease images’, fooling doctors, patients, immune systems and statistics alike. Although it happened before in history, with Syphilis, many people seem to find this idea hard to grasp.

In this current article I only used ALS, which is considered a lethal and incurable disease to all afflicted, as an example to open up your imagination. Yet I could have also used any of the other 364 known potential misdiagnoses of Lyme as well.

Odds are about 100% that you personally know people who suffer from several of these illnesses, as the list includes MS, Parkinson, Alzheimer, ME, Fibromyalgia, ADHD and so on.

This is why I wrote my book for people like my friend, as it’s much easier for her to see the scope and possibilities than for the people like her friend, who are disabled and so frightened that will tend to believe their medical ‘death sentence’.

Is Lyme always the cause? Most likely not, as with anything in life, but without a 100% reliable test we will never know for sure in how many cases it is. Can it be? Of course it can, in the current climate of ‘lost knowledge’. Here are just a few more examples.

In 1988, the Canadian Department of Health reported several cases of congenital Lyme infection. In 2017: silence.

In 2012, the WHO stated in an instruction about blood donation (p.84) that Lyme Borrelia infection can “occur after the bite of a tick, mosquito or horsefly and can survive blood storage temperatures“.

Did you know? Does your doctor? Not if they don’t stumble upon it in their private lives, as retired MD Dr. Al Miller did. He recently discovered his daughter-in-law (43) was wrongly diagnosed with – again – ALS and that her health improved, after she was (properly) tested and treated for Lyme. Dr. Miller has become very vocal about it.

Change?

Using normal human, scientific or professional logic does not really help to understand the current bias against Lyme as a potential cause for many different illnesses. It simply does not fit the current model.

So change will not come from ‘above’. Throughout history, it never has, because ‘above’ has no interests in changing a status quo. Both the CDC and the WHO are political organizations.

The main insight you may need to fully understand why a severe and widespread disease – or rather pandemic – is so systematically ignored, downplayed or simply denied to exist in the first place, is to appreciate what it means that Lyme is called a ‘political disease’.

This quote might give you a hint: “a patient cured is a customer lost”. That is why a paradigm shift entails more than just ‘finding a cure for ALS’ (or those 364 other diseases) and emptying a next bucket of ice cubes; no matter how well-intended the gesture is.

References

Neurodegenerative and Fatiguing Illnesses, Infections and Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Use of Natural Supplements to Improve Mitochondrial Function. Garth L. Nicolson, Robert Settineri and Rita R. Ellithorpe. Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2014; 4(1):23-65 (page 23 of 65)

Lyme disease-induced polyradiculopathy mimicking amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Burakgazi AZ1. Int J Neurosci. 2014 Nov;124(11):859-62. doi: 10.3109/00207454.2013.879582. Epub 2014 Feb 7.

Chronic or Late Lyme Neuroborreliosis: Analysis of Evidence Compared to Chronic or Late NeurosyphilisJudith Miklossy. The Open Neurology Journal. 2012; 6: 146–157.

Dr. Richard Horowitz has a section in his second book ‘How Can I Get Better?‘ (page 282) where he says “Yet, if Lyme disease, co infections and environmental toxins are the sole causes of ALS, I would expect to see even more of these patients coming in with the disease.

Huib Kraaijeveld

Author of ‘Shifting the Lyme Paradigm‘, chairman of the On Lyme Foundation and founding member of the Ad Hoc Committee for Health Equity in ICD

____________

**Comment**

Bravo Huib!

Dr. Miller:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/05/11/dr-al-miller-lyme-disease-series/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/10/13/dr-miller-a-new-perspective-on-lyme-disease/

Second Jamestown Canyon Virus Case in New Hampshire

http://outbreaknewstoday.com/new-hampshire-reports-2nd-jamestown-canyon-virus-case-27643/  Sept. 2017

New Hampshire health officials have recorded the second human Jamestown Canyon virus (JCV) case of the year in an adult from Goffstown. This follows a case confirmed in mid-August in Hanover.

Image/Elionas
Image/Elionas

It is likely that this case was acquired in New Hampshire, but due to recent travel, location of exposure is not certain.

“As we head into the fall, it’s important for people to remember that mosquito-borne diseases like Jamestown Canyon Virus are still a risk in New Hampshire,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Benjamin Chan. “We want residents and visitors to continue to enjoy the outdoors, but they should take steps to protect themselves from mosquito bites as long as mosquitoes are still around.”

LISTEN: Powassan virus: The spread is inevitable

Until the second hard frost of the season, residents and visitors to New Hampshire should continue to protect themselves and their family members from mosquito-borne diseases by using an effective mosquito repellant that contains 30% DEET, wearing long sleeves and pants at dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active, and removing standing water from around your home so mosquitoes do not have a place to breed. Repellents with picaridin, IR3535 and some oil of lemon eucalyptus and para-menthane-diol products also provide protection against mosquito bites. A hard frost is defined as two consecutive hours of temperatures below 28 degrees Fahrenheit.

Related: Iowa reports 1st West Nile virus death of 2017

Initially described in the early 1970s, JCV is a mosquito-borne pathogen that circulates widely in North America primarily between deer and a variety of mosquito species, but it can also infect humans. Reports of JCV in humans are rare (Since 2000, more than 50 cases of JCV have been identified nationally. The cases have primarily been in the Midwest and Northeast) and most reported illnesses caused by Jamestown Canyon virus have been mild, but moderate-to-severe central nervous system involvement has been reported.

 

Wolbachia – The Next Frankenstein?

Transmission electron micrograph of Wolachia within an insect cell

Credit:  Public Library of Science/Scott O’Neill

The latest in the effort for world domination over bugs and the diseases they carry is Wolbachia, a Gram-negative bacterium of the family Rickettsiales first found in 1924 and in 60% of all the insects, including some mosquitoes, crustaceans, and nematodes (worms). For those that like numbers, that’s over 1 million species of insects and other invertebrates. It is one of the most infectious bacterial genera on earth and was largely unknown until the 90’s due to its evasion tactics. It’s favorite hosts are filarial nematodes and arthropods.

Wolachia obtains nutrients through symbiotic relationships with its host. In arthropods it affects reproductive abilities by male killing, parthenogenesis, cytoplasmic incompatibility and feminization. However, if Wolbachia is removed from nematodes, the worms become infertile or die. These abilities are what make it so appealing for insect controlcytoplasmic incompatibility, which essentially means it results in sperm and eggs being unable to form viable offering.

http://www.slideserve.com/babu/wolbachia  (Nifty slide show here)

It also makes it appealing for use in human diseases such as elephantiasis and River Blindness caused by filarial nematodes, which are treated with antibiotics (doxycycline) targeting Wolbachia which in turn negatively impacts the worms. Traditional treatment for lymphatic Filariasis is Ivermectin but they also use chemotherapy to disrupt the interactions between Wolbachia and nematodes. This anti-Wolbachia strategy is a game-changer for treating onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis.  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/03/170316120451.htm

Lyme/MSIDS patients often have nematode involvement.

https://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php/Wolbachiahttps://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/emerging-diseases/200902/tick-menagerie-lyme-isnt-the-only-disease-you-can-get-tick  Both Willy Burgdorfer, the discoverer of the Lyme bacterium, as well as Richard Ostfeld, an animal ecologist found nematode worms in ticks. Since then, some provocative research involving nematodes, Lyme/MSIDS, dementia, and Alzheimer’s has been done.

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/06/03/borrelia-hiding-in-worms-causing-chronic-brain-diseases/https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/08/09/dr-paul-duray-research-fellowship-foundation-some-great-research-being-done-on-lyme-disease/https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/07/10/greg-lee-excellent-article-on-strategies-for-neurological-lyme/https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2015/10/18/psychiatric-lymemsids/

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-a-tiny-bacterium-called-wolbachia-could-defeat-dengue/  Yet, according to many, Wolbachia is the next eradicator of Dengue Fever and possibly Malaria, chikungunya, and yellow fever because it stops the virus from replicating inside mosquitoes that transmit the diseases. The approach is also believed to have potential for other vector-borne diseases like sleeping sickness transmitted by the tsetse fly.  Evidently, Wolbachia does not infect the Aedes aegypti mosquito naturally, so researchers have been infecting mosquitoes in the lab and releasing them into the wild since 2011. The article states it hopes that the method works and expects infection rates in people to drop and hopes that the mosquitoes will pass the bacterium to their offspring, despite it disappearing after a generation or two of breeding and needing to “condition” the microbes to get them used to living in mosquitoes before injecting them. They also state Wolbachia is “largely benign for mosquitoes and the environment,” and “To humans, Wolbachia poses no apparent threat.” Their work has shown that the bacterium resides only within the cells of insects and other arthropods. They also state that tests on spiders and geckos that have eaten Wolbachia mosquitoes are just fine and show no symptoms. An independent risk assessment by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organizatioin (CSIRO), Australia’s national science agency, concluded that, “Release of Wolbachia mosquitoes would have negligible risk to people and the environment.”

Interestingly, trials are underway in Vietnam, Indonesia, and now Brazil.

They state that scaling up operations to rear enough Wolbachia mosquitoes is too labor-intensive and in Cairns they are going to put Wolbachia mosquito eggs right into the environment. Evidently, other researchers are wanting to release genetically modified (GMO) mosquitoes that carry a lethal gene, and they’ve done it, and it’s causing an uproar:   http://america.aljazeera.com/articles/2013/11/9/genetically-modifiedmosquitoessetoffuproarinfloridakeys.html

http://www.naturalnews.com/2017-07-25-googles-sister-company-releasing-20-million-mosquitoes-infected-with-fertility-destroying-bacteria-depopulation-experiment.html  As of July 14, 2017, Google’s bio-lab, Verily Life Sciences,  started releasing Wolbachia laced mosquitoes in California as part of project, Debug Fresno to reduce the mosquito population.

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/research-exposes-new-health-risks-genetically-modified-mosquitoes-and-salmon  Numerous studies show unexpected insertions and deletions which can translate into possible toxins, allergens, carcinogens, and other changes.  Science can not predict the real-life consequences on global pattens of gene function.

So, why question the use of Wolbachia as a bio-control?

For Lyme/MSIDS patients, 3 words: worms and inflammation.

Dogs treated for heart worm (D. immitis) have trouble due to the heart worm medication causing Wolbachia to be released into the blood and tissues causing severe Inflammation in pulmonary artery endothelium which may form thrombi and interstitial inflammation. Wolbachia also activates pro inflammatory cytokines. Pets treated with tetracycline a month prior to heart worm treatment will kill some D. immitis as well as suppress worm production. When given after heart worm medication, it may decrease the inflammation from Wolbachia kill off.
http://www.critterology.com/articles/wolbachia-and-their-role-heartworm-disease-and-treatment

The words worms and inflammation should cause every Lyme/MSIDS patient to pause. Many of us are put on expensive anthelmintics like albendazole, ivermectin, Pin X, and praziquantel to get rid of worms and are told to avoid anything causing inflammation due to the fact we have enough of it already. We go on special anti-inflammatory diets and take systemic enzymes and herbs to try and lower inflammation.   https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/04/22/systemic-enzymes/

Seems to me, many MSIDS/LYME patients when treated with anthelmintics, will have Wolbachia released into their blood and tissues causing wide spread inflammation, similarly to dogs.

And that’s not all.

According to a study by Penn State, mosquitoes infected with Wolbachia are more likely to become infected with West Nile – which will then be transmitted to humans.“This is the first study to demonstrate that Wolbachia can enhance a human pathogen in a mosquito, one researcher said. “The results suggest that caution should be used when releasing Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes into nature to control vector-borne diseases of humans.” “Multiple studies suggest that Wolbachia may enhance some Plasmodium parasites in mosquitoes, thus increasing the frequency of malaria transmission to rodents and birds,” he said.  The study states that caution should be used when releasing Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes into nature. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140710141628.htm

So besides very probable wide spread inflammation, and that other diseases may become more prevalent due to Wolbachia laced mosquitoes, studies show Wolbachia enhances Malaria in mosquitos. Lyme/MSIDS patients are often co-infected with Babesia, a malarial-like parasite that requires similar treatment and has been found to make Lyme (borrelia) much worse. It is my contention that the reason many are not getting well is they are not being treated for the numerous co-infections.  Some Lyme/MSIDS patients have Malaria and Lyme.

Regardless of what the CDC states, all the doxycycline in the world is not going to cure this complicated and complex illness.

Lastly, with Brazil’s recent explosion of microcephaly, the introduction of yet another man-made intervention (Wolbachia laced mosquitos) should be considered in evaluating potential causes and cofactors. And while the CDC is bound and determined to blame the benign virus, Zika, there are numerous other factors that few are considering – as well as the synergistic effect of all the variables combined. Microcephaly could very well be a perfect storm of events.
https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/12/21/how-zika-got-the-blame/https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/03/04/health-policy-recap/https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/03/08/fixation-on-zikapolio/

I hate bugs as much as the next person, but careful long-term studies of Wolbachia are required here.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20394659  “Despite the intimate association of B. burgdorferi and I. scapularis, the population structure, evolutionary history, and historical biogeography of the pathogen are all contrary to its arthropod vector.

In short, borrelia (as well as numerous pathogens associated with Lyme/MSIDS), is a smart survivor.

While borrelia have been around forever with 300 strains and counting worldwide, epidemics, such as what happened with Lyme Disease in Connecticut are not caused by genetics but by environmental toxins – in this case, bacteria, viruses, funguses, and stuff not even named yet.

Circling back to Wolbachia.

Hopefully it is evident that many man-made interventions have been introduced into the environment causing important health ramifications: Wolbachia laced mosquitoes and eggs, GMO mosquitoes including CRISPR, and in the case of Zika in Brazil, whole-cell pertussis vaccinations (DTap) for pregnant women up to 20 days prior to expected date of birth, a pyriproxyfen based pesticide applied by the State in Brazil on drinking water, as well as aerial sprays of the insect growth regulators Altosid and VectoBac (Aquabac, Teknar, and LarvX, along with 25 other Bti products registered for use in the U.S.) in New York (Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and The Bronx) to combat Zika. “We feel it’s critical that the scientific community consider the potential hazards of all off-target mutations caused by CRISPR, including single nucleotide mutations and mutations in non-coding regions of the genome … Researchers who aren’t using whole genome sequencing to find off-target effects may be missing potentially important mutations. Even a single nucleotide change can have a huge impact.”  http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/06/13/crispr-gene-editing-dangers.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art3&utm_campaign=20170613Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM147520&et_rid=2042753642

All of this is big, BIG business.

Is the introduction of Wolbachia another puzzle piece in the perfect storm of events causing or exacerbating human health issues?

The jury’s still out, but it’s not looking good – particularly for the chronically ill.