Archive for the ‘thyroid’ Category

5 Blood Tests You Need Every Year

Regular blood testing is an important way to keep track of your overall well-being. Getting tested at routine intervals can allow you to see how your body is changing over time and empower you to make informed decisions about your health.

Here are five blood tests you should consider getting every year.

Complete Thyroid Panel

Most physicians, including endocrinologists, will only check one or two thyroid markers: TSH and/or total T4. These tests do not give you a complete picture of your thyroid function. At HMG, there are 6 additional thyroid-related values that we routinely check for our patients: Free T4, Total T3, Free T3, Reverse T3, anti TPO Ab, and anti Thyroglobluin Ab. If any of these blood test values are not optimal, we take the steps to prevent or treat thyroid dysfunction or disease.

Essential Nutrients

Nutrients such as iron, vitamin D, vitamin B12, and magnesium are important for optimal bodily function, but they’re rarely checked at a routine primary care visit. Many people are deficient in these nutrients, so it’s imperative they are checked and supplements suggested when levels are not optimal.

Complete Metabolic Panel and Complete Blood Count

Unlike the other tests we run, the comprehensive metabolic panel (CMP) and the complete blood count (CBC) are ordered when you see your primary care physician. These tests are essential to understanding electrolyte and hydration status, kidney function, liver function, and blood cell values. These values can also tell us if someone is fighting an acute or chronic infection.

Metabolic Markers

Metabolic markers such as Hemoglobin A1c, fasting glucose and insulin, and a lipid panel are essential to understanding how a person is processing macronutrients. Most primary care visits include a yearly basic lipid panel and glucose level – rarely will you receive a Hemoglobin A1c. These tests help determine whether there is an increased risk of heart disease from cholesterol levels or not. Many times people are told that they have high cholesterol levels when they are not actually a risk.

Inflammatory Markers

Inflammatory markers like hsCRP and homocysteine are rarely checked at a routine primary care visit. hsCRP is an inflammatory marker which can indicate general inflammatory status. An elevation can tell us there is inflammation happening in the body that should be addressed, whether it be from physical trauma, emotional stress, oxidative stress, environmental toxicity, allergy, sedentary lifestyle, or food sensitivities. Homocysteine is an amino acid that requires methylated-vitamin B12 and folate to be cleared. Elevations in this level can help us understand your stroke and heart disease risk, B vitamin status, ability to methylate, ability to detox, and make neurotransmitters.

https://www.holtorfmed.com/?

There’s many great articles on the Holtdorf site.  Check them out.

Occupational Exposure to Biocides Increases Risk of Thyroid Cancer

https://oem.bmj.com/content/74/7/502

Occupational exposure to pesticides and other biocides and risk of thyroid cancer

Fanhua Zeng1,2Catherine Lerro2Jérôme Lavoué3Huang Huang4Jack Siemiatycki3Nan Zhao2Shuangge Ma5Nicole C Deziel2Melissa C Friesen6Robert Udelsman7Yawei Zhang2,4

Abstract

Objectives To assess the associations between occupational exposure to biocides and pesticides and risk of thyroid cancer.

Methods Using data from a population-based case–control study involving 462 incident thyroid cancer cases and 498 controls in Connecticut collected in 2010–2011, we examined the association with occupational exposure to biocides and pesticides through a job-exposure matrix. We used unconditional logistic regression models to estimate OR and 95% CI, adjusting for potential confounders.

Results Individuals who were occupationally ever exposed to biocides had an increased risk of thyroid cancer (OR=1.65, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.35), and the highest risk was observed for the high cumulative probability of exposure (OR=2.18, 95% CI 1.28 to 3.73). The observed associations were similar when we restricted to papillary thyroid cancer and well-differentiated thyroid cancer. Stronger associations were observed for thyroid microcarcinomas (tumour size ≤1 cm). No significant association was observed for occupational exposure to pesticides.

Conclusions Our study provides the first evidence linking occupational exposure to biocides and risk of thyroid cancer. The results warrant further investigation.

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**Comment**
Biocides are disinfectants, antiseptics, and preservatives.  For the 23 different types, see:  https://copublications.greenfacts.org/en/biocides-antibiotic-resistance/figtableboxes/12.htm
Of particular concern are human hygiene products, in-can preservatives, insecticides (acaricides – arthropod control), repellents, and food preservatives.
Regarding insecticides/acaricides, always cover your body when spraying, wear gloves, and stand so that the sprays do not come back on you.  Avoid breathing sprays into lungs.

 

Free Medicine & Supplements That Work

https://www.coachjoedi.com/stacked-podcast/dr-shade

Free Medicine & Supplements That Work

Interview with Joe DiStefano and Dr. Chris Shade

After a run-in with Joe Mercola at PaleoFX, biochemical hacker Dr. Chris Shade started intermittent fasting—and it put him in ketosis almost immediately, to his surprise. As the founder of supplement company Quicksilver Scientific, the leader of the R&D team, and the developer of all products and protocols, Dr. Shade is no stranger to problem-solving. He conducted the research necessary to find the link between AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) and the production of ketones, and used this understanding to inform the development of new Quicksilver Scientific supplements. The resulting products have the power to transform your sleep patterns—and your health.

“There’s a balance between your immune system and your adrenals. When that’s ideal, you don’t get sick. When your adrenals can’t hold it anymore, you get all fogged up.”

In this first video episode of Stacked, we put supplements under the microscope and explore their role in cellular health, from detoxification to ketosis. Dr. Shade explains the interconnectedness of stress, glutathione, and leaky gut; walks us through the best way to prepare for a detox protocol, and shares his experience with NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and travel recovery. He’s on a mission to combat universal toxicity, and this episode is packed full of information that will help you navigate the saturated supplement market and experience optimal health.

“We’ve got tools that let us push different levers and such. But it’s not just the biochemical—it’s our whole application to the world.”

  • First video episode! (2:00)

  • The breath, the parasympathetic nervous system, and detoxification (7:00)

  • How to rebalance neurotransmitters (it’s less complicated than it sounds) (12:30)

  • Free medicine: supplements can’t save you from an unhealthy lifestyle (15:00)

  • Preparation for a detox protocol (16:40)

  • How your cells work (and what happens when they don’t) (21:00)

  • If our environments aren’t more toxic, why are we more susceptible—and how do we heal ourselves? (25:30)

  • Visceral fat, glutathione, and leaky gut: every process informs another (28:00)

  • Why plants don’t kill you (35:00)

  • What AMPK does in the body, and the effect of intermittent fasting (37:00)

  • Mitochondria and supplements (46:00)

  • The science behind the new Quicksilver Scientific supplements (58:00)

  • NAD and travel recovery (1:05:00)

  • Supplements and sleep: align more, sleep less (1:10:30)

  • How to know you’re getting your NAD levels right (1:15:00)

  • Take a holistic approach: it’s your whole application to the world (1:17:50)

Find Dr. Shade

Instagram I Facebook I Quicksilver Scientific I YouTube

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Brain.fm 

Let me tell you about a little hack I have been using lately: Before every show, I find a quiet place, grab my noise-canceling headphones and head over to brain.fm. With brain.fm you can decide how you want to spend the next few hours of your day — focus, productivity, relaxation — and brain.fm will play music that has been scientifically engineered to shift your brain in that direction. (See more of the science behind this here).

You can now save 20% on this already inexpensive app when you head over to brain.fm/stacked.

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For more:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/11/07/5-effects-of-stress-on-the-mind-and-body-10-tips-to-reduce-stress/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/10/26/5-thyroid-lies-your-endocrinologist-may-try-to-tell-you/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/11/26/treating-adrenal-dysfunction-with-cortisol/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/11/12/is-it-mental-illness-or-hashimotos-thyroiditis/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/12/22/hormones-emotional-health/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2015/06/10/audio-on-hormones-and-adrenal-support/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/07/23/the-science-of-detoxification-how-to-boost-your-natural-detox-powers/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/12/14/detoxing-with-infrared-saunas/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/06/01/yes-you-do-sweat-out-toxins/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/12/30/the-liver-the-most-under-appreciated-organ-in-the-body/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Treating Adrenal Dysfunction With Cortisol

https://www.holtorfmed.com/treating-adrenal-dysfunction-with-cortisol/?

Treating Adrenal Dysfunction with Cortisol

By Kent Holtorf, M.D. on Oct 17, 2019 

Originally Posted November 2012

Many people report feeling under constant pressure and stress which causes them to feel sluggish, irritable and fatigued. They are desperately trying to clear up that mental fogginess with coffee or other stimulants, just to crash worse afterwards. Does this sound like you?

Although it’s been widely accepted as the “common way of living in a working, modern society”, it is not normal.

Understanding Adrenal Fatigue

The adrenals are small glands that sit on the kidneys. They regulate many bodily processes through the production of hormones. The hormones produced by the adrenal glands help regulate blood sugar, immune function, and stress response. A disruption in the excretion of these hormones can lead to malfunction in these bodily processes and others.

Learn even more about the adrenals here.

Adrenal fatigue is a chronic condition wherein the adrenals are incapable of supplying the hormones needed for healthy bodily function. There are a number of potential causes for this dysfunction including physical trauma, a stressful professional or personal life, hormone imbalances, chronic illnesses, chronic infections, and sleep deficits. These and other physiological stressors trigger adrenal activity. If the adrenals continue to experience an increased demand, they will eventually become exhausted and incapable of sustaining healthy function.

Learn more about the causes of adrenal fatigue here.

The Symptoms of Adrenal Fatigue

Low levels of adrenal hormones, specifically cortisol, can result in symptoms such as:

  • Hypoglycemia
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle aches
  • Sugar or salt craving
  • Shakiness relieved with eating
  • Moodiness
  • Food sensitivities
  • Allergies
  • Recurrent infections
  • Dizzy when standing
  • Low blood pressure
  • Decreased ability to handle stress
  • “Brain fog”
  • Swollen ankles that are worse at night
  • Muscular weakness
  • Difficulty getting out of bed
  • Wiped out with exercise
  • Inability to tolerate thyroid replacement

Learn more about the symptoms of adrenal fatigue here.

The Role of Cortisol in Adrenal Function

The most important anti-stress hormone in the body is cortisol. It protects the body from excessive adrenal fatigue by:

  • normalizing blood sugar: cortisol increases the blood sugar level in the body, thus providing the energy needed for the body to physically escape threat or injury in order to survive. Cortisol works in tandem with insulin from the pancreas to provide adequate glucose for energy.
  • anti-inflammatory response: cortisol is a powerful anti-inflammatory agent. It is secreted as part of the anti-inflammatory response. Its objective is to remove and prevent swelling and redness of nearly all tissues.
  • immune system suppression: cortisol influences most cells that participate in the immune reaction, especially white blood cells. It suppresses white blood cells, natural killer cells, monocytes, macrophages and mast cells. It also suppresses adrenal fatigue.
  • vaso-constriction: people with low cortisol have low blood pressure and reduced activity to other body agents that constrict blood vessels.
  • physiology of stress: people with adrenal fatigue can not tolerate stress and will then succumb to severe stress. As their stress increases, progressively higher levels of cortisol are required. When the cortisol level cannot rise in response to stress, it is impossible to maintain the body in optimum stress response.

Cortisol sustains life via two opposite, but related, kinds of regulatory actions: releasing and activating the existing defense mechanisms of the body, while shutting down and modifying the same mechanisms to prevent them.

Using Cortisol to Safely and Effectively Treat Adrenal Fatigue

In the right situation and using the right dose, hormone replacement can be of great benefit for people with adrenal dysfunction. Medical science is just beginning to find out that a person can feel horrible and function poorly even with a minimal to moderate hormone deficiency that is clinically undetected by routine blood tests. This is evident in the case of adrenal fatigue.

Some physicians, notably Dr. Jefferies in the mid 1980s, have advocated low dose cortisol as safe for long-term use. Dr. Jefferies found that as long as the adrenal hormone level is kept within the normal range, the main toxicity that a patient might experience was a slight upset stomach, due to the body not being used to having the hormone come in through the stomach.

In an article published by Dr. Kent Holtorf in the Journal of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome about therapeutic doses of cortisol for patients with fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome, he states:

“Because treatment with low physiologic doses of cortisol (< 15 mg) has been shown to be safe and effective and routine dynamic ACTH testing does not appear to have significant diagnostic sensitivity, it is reasonable to give a therapeutic trial of physiologic doses of cortisol to the majority of patients with CFS and FM, especially to those who have symptoms that are consistent with adrenal dysfunction, have low blood pressure, or have baseline cortisol levels in the low or low-normal range. (…) Physiologic replacement of cortisol at doses of 5 mg to 15 mg a day are safe, with little or no associated risk. Such physiologic doses don’t carry the risk of adrenal and immune suppression or bone loss, which are well known risks of pharmacological doses of corticosteroids. Cortisol treatment carries significantly less risk and a greater potential for benefit than standard treatments, such as antidepressants, muscle relaxants, anticonvulsants and narcotics.”

Finding a Doctor that Understands Adrenal Fatigue

The adrenals are a critical component of healthy bodily function. Adrenal fatigue result in dramatic repercussions on your physical, emotional, and mental health. Treatment of adrenal fatigue should be tailored to you and your specific needs and can include low dose cortisol, adrenal glandulars, vitamin C, Pantothenic acid, licorice, and chromium.

At Holtorf Medical Group, our physicians are trained to provide you with cutting-edge testing and innovative treatments to find the answers you deserve and a treatment plan that is personalized to you. If you are experiencing symptoms of adrenal fatigue, give us a call at 877-508-1177 to see how we can help you!

Resources

1. Kent Holtorf, MD. “Diagnosis and Treatment of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) Axis Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and Fibromyalgia (FM).” https://www.holtorfmed.com/download/chronic-fatigue-syndrome-and-fibromyalgia/Diagnosis_and_Treatment_of_HPA_Axis_Dysfunction.pdf

2. Kent Holtorf, MD. “Adrenal Fatigue Testing.” https://www.holtorfmed.com/download/other/Adrenal-Testing.pdf
3. Kent Holtorf, MD. “Adrenal Fatigue Treatment Options.” https://www.holtorfmed.com/download/other/Adrenal-Treatments.pdf.
4. William McK. Jefferies. “Safe Uses of Cortisol.” Book.

How the Adrenals and Thyroid Are Connected

By Holtorf Medical Group on Oct 15, 2019 11:40 am

Hormones are one of the most influential elements of wellness. These chemical structures relay messages throughout the body to regulate numerous functions. There are multiple systems responsible for production and regulation of hormones. Two of the most important being the adrenals and the thyroid. In addition to be essential for healthy bodily function, these two systems have a significant degree of influence on one another. Therefore, to better maintain wellness it is important to understand the role of the adrenals, the thyroid, and their mutual impact over each other.

What are the Adrenals?

The adrenals are small but highly influential organs located just above both kidneys. These are the glands responsible for controlling the body’s stress response as well as producing hormones essential for healthy bodily function. Some of the most notable adrenal hormones include pregnenolone, adrenaline, estrogen, progesterone, testosterone, DHEA, and cortisol – learn more about the adrenal hormones here. These and other adrenal hormones regulate areas such as metabolism, physical ability, libido, energy level, stress response, and much more.

Learn even more about the adrenal glands here.

What is the Thyroid?

The thyroid gland is located at the base of the neck. Like the adrenals, the thyroid regulates important areas of health including metabolism, mood, weight, neurological function, energy level, and more. The thyroid completes this complex task through the secretion of thyroid hormones. The most well-recognized thyroid hormones are thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). These hormones help to determine the activity level of virtually every cell and tissue in the body. It is for this reason that some refer to the thyroid as the body’s gas pedal.

Learn even more about the thyroid here.

Identifying Arenal and Thyroid Imbalances

Disruption of either the thyroid or the adrenals can result in a cascade of dysfunction throughout the body. There are several ways in which the adrenals and the thyroid may become dysfunctional including physical damage or trauma, chronic mental or physical stress, and chronic illness. These factors can contribute to hormonal imbalances that encourage the development of serious dysfunction such as adrenal fatigue and hypothyroidism.

Many symptoms of adrenal fatigue and hypothyroidism are shared. Because of this, it is common for patients to be misdiagnosed. Fatigue, poor sleep quality or insomnia, depression, PMS, brain fog, sensitivity to cold, weight gain, forgetfulness, and loss of libido are just some of the shared symptoms of adrenal dysfunction and hypothyroidism. If you experience some, or all, of these symptoms, it is important to assess both adrenal and thyroid function.

The Shared Influence of the Adrenals and the Thyroid

Although they are two different systems, the adrenals and the thyroid have a great deal of overlap. Typically, this is beneficial as both systems can support each other. However, because they are so closely related, if one system fails or malfunctions it often leads to disruption of the other.

The adrenal glands are responsible for regulating the body’s stress response. When we experience stress the adrenals release cortisol. The increase in cortisol triggers elevated immune activity, increased inflammatory response, heightened physical ability, and greater alertness. These are all beneficial qualities when handling stress in the short term. However, constant activation of the adrenals encourages further release of cortisol. Excess cortisol can negatively affect thyroid function and contribute to hypothyroidism. In part, this is why many individuals suffering from chronic stress also experience a decline in thyroid function.

For the thyroid to effectively regulate bodily function, T4 must be converted to T3 and interact with tissues throughout the body. Studies show that certain adrenal hormones play an important role in the conversion process of thyroid hormones. Additionally, some experts suggest that adrenal hormones are needed to effectively deliver T3 into cells and tissues. Therefore, poor adrenal function and a lack of adrenal hormones may inhibit thyroid activity resulting in symptoms of hypothyroidism.

Both systems play a significant role in maintaining healthy metabolic activity. If either system faulters, the other must work harder to make up the difference. For example, if metabolic activity is failing due to an underactive thyroid, the adrenals must work harder to maintain proper metabolic function. If thyroid function remains defunct, the adrenals will ultimately become exhausted resulting in adrenal fatigue. With these two systems exhausted, the body is almost certain to experience a significant and long-lasting decline in functionality.

The Importance of Treating Both Thyroid and Adrenal Dysfunction

Because hypothyroidism and adrenal fatigue both involve hormone deficiency, the conditions are treated in a similar fashion. The most common approach is to administer hormone therapy based on the individual needs of the patient. For example, if thyroid dysfunction is suspected, a patient may be given thyroid hormone supplements to increase their hormone values. Similarly, if adrenal signs point to adrenal fatigue, a doctor may recommend cortisol or other adrenal hormone supplements.

When treating the adrenals or the thyroid it is critical that diagnosis is accurate. For example, in the presence of adrenal malfunction, thyroid hormone therapies may actually cause greater disruption. This is because thyroid medication accelerates metabolic activity, which can place greater stress on the adrenals thereby contributing further to adrenal fatigue . Ideally, if a patient is presenting symptoms of either adrenal dysfunction or thyroid disease, both systems are evaluated, and a full gamut of tests are run to assess relevant hormone values.

Learn more about the importance of treating both thyroid and adrenal dysfunction here.

Finding a Doctor That Understands the Adrenal-Thyroid Connection

The body is composed of an intricate web of interlocking systems, many of which have direct influence on one other. An excellent example of this is the relationship between the adrenals and the thyroid. Both systems are integral to overall bodily function and exert their influence through the production of hormones. Due to their high degree of interconnectivity, dysfunction of one can have a dramatic negative impact on the other. Therefore, if symptoms of either adrenal or thyroid dysfunction develop, it is important to consider and assess both systems. Being aware of the close relationship between the adrenals and the thyroid and their important role in bodily function can help you better preserve their function and maintain greater wellness.

At Holtorf Medical Group, our physicians are knowledgeable in both thyroid and adrenal dysfunction, and how the two are connected. Because of this, they are able to provide you with cutting-edge testing and innovative treatments to find the answers you deserve and a treatment plan that is personalized to you. If you are experiencing symptoms of thyroid or adrenal dysfunction, give us a call at 877-508-1177!

References

1. Victor Parsons, DM and Ian Ramsay, MD. “Thyroid and adrenal relationships.” Postgrad. med. J. (May 1968) 44, 377-384.

2. Seck-Gassama et al. “Serum cortisol level variations in thyroid diseases.” Dakar Med. 2000;45(1):30-3.
3. Amy Myers, MD. “The Adrenal-Thyroid Connection.” Amy Myers.

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For more:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/10/26/5-thyroid-lies-your-endocrinologist-may-try-to-tell-you/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/11/12/is-it-mental-illness-or-hashimotos-thyroiditis/

 

 

 

 

Is it Mental Illness or Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

https://www.holtorfmed.com/mental-illness-hashimotos-disease/?

Is it Mental Illness or Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis?

Is it Mental Illness or Hashimoto's Thyroiditis?

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is a common cause of hypothyroidism that is often misdiagnosed as depression or other mental health conditions.

Updated September 2019

Imagine having all the symptoms of a major mental illness such as manic depression, paranoid schizophrenia, psychotic depression, or even a bipolar disorder. One day you wake up with overflowing physical energy, even feeling severely anxious, with a rapid heartbeat, profuse sweating, trembling hands, and diarrhea, and you can’t stop losing weight. Then soon enough, without warning, your energy plummets. You feel like a slug, are constipated, your hair starts falling out, you gain weight no matter how little you eat, and you are severely depressed. You may have difficulty swallowing, sound hoarse, and feel like you have swallowed something that wont go down. And then, suddenly, your old symptoms return, and you feel anxious, sweaty, trembling, and panicky. This cycle can repeat itself again and again.

While your symptoms resemble a mental health issue, they could be signs of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, one cause of hypothyroidism. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, also known as autoimmune thyroiditis or simply “Hashimoto’s, is caused by an autoimmune disorder. In this case, the body’s immune system sees the thyroid gland as a foreign body and begins to attack, damaging and killing thyroid cells along the way. As the cells are damaged or destroyed, they release their stored thyroid hormone, causing classic hyperthyroid symptoms such as anxiety, panic attacks, shaking hands, sweating, and a racing heart.

Each autoimmune attack causes more and more damage to the thyroid gland until, ultimately, the gland is no longer able to produce adequate thyroid hormones. Every cell in the body needs thyroid hormones, so a deficiency can wreak havoc on the entire system, causing depression, weight gain, severe fatigue, brain fog, memory loss, and even overall body aches.

With such a dramatic swing in symptoms, it’s easy to see how Hashimoto’s disease could be misdiagnosed as a mental illness like manic depression or bipolar disorder.

And it happens much too often. A 1987 study found that as many as 15% of patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital for depression actually were suffering from some level of hypothyroidism.

Learn more about Hashimoto’s here.

Symptoms of Hashimoto’s

At first, Hashimoto’s can produce little to no symptoms. But as the disease progresses, the body will cycle between hyperthyroid symptoms and hypothyroid symptoms, until ultimately the patient becomes permanently hypothyroid. Symptoms vary based on whether the thyroid is under attack or at rest, but can include:

  • Anxiety
  • Panic attacks
  • Insomnia
  • Unexplained weight gain or weight loss
  • Diarrhea or constipation
  • Feeling excessively cold or hot
  • Weakness and fatigue
  • Muscle and join pain or achiness
  • Hair loss
  • Irregular periods
  • Difficulty concentrating or thinking clearly, confusion, forgetfulness
  • Hoarseness, difficulty swallowing, or a tight feeling in the throat

Get the full list of thyroid disease symptoms here.

Getting the Right Diagnosis

Thyroid hormone lab tests such as the TSH, Free T4, Free T3 and Reverse T3 can diagnose hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism, but to get a clear picture of a potential autoimmune thyroid disease, you must check for increased antibodies that are specific to thyroid proteins. These include thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and antithyroglobulin; however, it’s important to know that these antibodies can be at normal levels and a patient still have hashimoto’s disease. It can also be useful to check levels of thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI), which can be seen in Graves’ disease, another autoimmune thyroid disorder.

Get a FREE downloadable thyroid panel lab slip here.

Proper Treatment for Hashimoto’s

If lab tests or symptoms indicate Hashimoto’s, it is important to begin treatment as soon as possible to help avoid further damage to the thyroid gland. In addition to thyroid hormone replacement therapy, the following treatments options should be explored.

  • Supplements such as selenium can help lower antibody levels while strengthening the immune system
  • Treatment of any chronic bacterial or viral infections can also be important in managing autoimmune thyroid disease. Often, these infections can initiate the immune system dysfunction
  • Regulating the immune system can make a very positive difference in autoimmune disorders like Hashimoto’s. Medications including low-dose Naltrexone and gamma-globulin, can help balance immune system activity and reduce attacks.

Getting the Care You Deserve

The violent swings of Hashimoto’s disease can be very frightening, not only for the patient who has the autoimmune disease, but also for friends and family who watch their loved one struggling, but with proper diagnosis and treatment, the symptoms of Hashimoto’s can be resolved.

At Holtorf Medical Group, our physicians are trained to provide you with cutting-edge testing and innovative treatments to properly diagnose and treat your autoimmune thyroid disease, optimize your health and improve your quality of life. If you have been diagnosed with Hashimoto’s, but aren’t getting the treatment you need or if you have symptoms associated with thyroid dysfunction, call us at 877-508-1177 to see how we can help you!

Resources

1. Kent Holtorf, MD. “Understanding Local Control of Thyroid Hormones: (Deiodinases Function and Activity).” https://www.nahypothyroidism.org/deiodinases/
2. Kent Holtorf, MD. “Thyroid Hormone Transport.” https://www.nahypothyroidism.org/thyroid-hormone-transport/
3. Kent Holtorf, MD. “Diagnosis of Hypothyroidism: Are we getting what we want from TSH testing?” https://www.nahypothyroidism.org/how-accurate-is-tsh-testing/
4. Kent Holtorf, MD. “Why Doesn’t My Endocrinologist Know All of This?” https://www.nahypothyroidism.org/why-doesnt-my-doctor-know-all-of-this/

5. Dana L. Mincer; Ishwarlal Jialal. “Hashimoto Thyroiditis.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK459262/
6. LDN Trust. “Conditions that are helped by Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN).” https://www.ldnresearchtrust.org/conditions

How HMG Has Helped Others: Patient Testimonial

After seeing 3 other doctors (over a 5 year period) for Hashimoto thyroid disease treatment, I finally found Dr. Holtorf (thank God!). I could write paragraphs on what I’d been through but the bottom line is that I finally found a doctor that is not only a good listener, compassionate & kind, but one who actually thinks “outside the box”.

For those of us who don’t respond in a conventional manner to medications, old school “by the book” endocrinologists have repeatedly patted us on the back & said, “Your TSH is fine”, just keep doing what you’re doing. In the meantime, I for one, was sleeping 16 hours a day, spent my life in a mind fog & was fatigued beyond belief (I even slept in my car during my lunchbreaks at work).

Dr.Holtorf immediately asked the right questions, patiently waiting through my confusion & tears, and made changes to my medication regime that truly turned things around for me.

I can’t say enough good things about him as a doctor & a caring person. – Ilene G.

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**Comment**

Every Lyme/MSIDS patient I work with has messed up thyroid issues. In fact, one infected patient felt nearly well just by addressing the thyroid.

Notice the article talks about the importance of dealing with bacterial and viral infections. Often, when you deal with the infection(s), your many symptoms can just disappear; however, it’s important you partner with your ILADS-trained doctor to sleuth out your deficiencies and then supplement what your own body isn’t producing.

Most doctors are not privy to appropriate thyroid testing. Within this article there is a printable thyroid panel slip. The link will direct you to a great article explaining all the different elements in the panel as well as a downloadable slip you can take to your doctor. All of the required tests have a black X by them. I highly advise you to take advantage of this if you haven’t addressed your thyroid.

Also, please see another great read by Holtdorf on lies endocrinologists tell patients:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/10/26/5-thyroid-lies-your-endocrinologist-may-try-to-tell-you/  In the comment section I give a trick my doctor uses to determine if you need additional T3 as sometimes our bodies aren’t able to properly convert T4 into T3. Many feel this is a genetic issue.  Conventional medicine states our bodies will do this naturally; however, according to this article, 15% of the population can’t convert.  I’m one of them: https://www.healthcentral.com/slideshow/thyroid-patients-and-t3  T3 is important because it delivers oxygen and energy to your cells, tissues, glands, and organs. More than 12 studies have shown the benefit of adding T3 to T4.

Many patients upon adding T3 were able to:

  • shed unwanted pounds
  • reduce cholesterol
  • have greater energy
  • have less brain fog
  • have less mood swings
  • be less depressed
  • regain supple skin
  • regain hair loss
  • reduce joint pain
The tiny thyroid hormone shouldn’t be neglected. Many thyroid symptoms look exactly like Lyme/MSIDS. Treat the thyroid and symptoms may disappear entirely.