Archive for the ‘research’ Category

Suicide, Lyme, and Associated Diseases

https://www.dovepress.com/suicide-and-lyme-and-associated-diseases-peer-reviewed-article-NDT   Published 16 June 2017 Volume 2017:13 Pages 1575—1587
Authors Bransfield RC

 Video abstract of original research paper

Purpose: The aim of this paper is to investigate the association between suicide and Lyme and associated diseases (LAD). No journal article has previously performed a comprehensive assessment of this subject.

Introduction: Multiple case reports and other references demonstrate a causal association between suicidal risk and LAD. Suicide risk is greater in outdoor workers and veterans, both with greater LAD exposure. Multiple studies demonstrate many infections and the associated proinflammatory cytokines, inflammatory-mediated metabolic changes, and quinolinic acid and glutamate changes alter neural circuits which increase suicidality. A similar pathophysiology occurs in LAD.

Method: A retrospective chart review and epidemiological calculations were performed.

Results: LAD contributed to suicidality, and sometimes homicidality, in individuals who were not suicidal before infection. A higher level of risk to self and others is associated with multiple symptoms developing after acquiring LAD, in particular, explosive anger, intrusive images, sudden mood swings, paranoia, dissociative episodes, hallucinations, disinhibition, panic disorder, rapid cycling bipolar, depersonalization, social anxiety disorder, substance abuse, hypervigilance, generalized anxiety disorder, genital–urinary symptoms, chronic pain, anhedonia, depression, low frustration tolerance, and posttraumatic stress disorder.

Negative attitudes about LAD from family, friends, doctors, and the health care system may also contribute to suicide risk. By indirect calculations, it is estimated there are possibly over 1,200 LAD suicides in the US per year.

Conclusion: Suicidality seen in LAD contributes to causing a significant number of previously unexplained suicides and is associated with immune-mediated and metabolic changes resulting in psychiatric and other symptoms which are possibly intensified by negative attitudes about LAD from others. Some LAD suicides are associated with being overwhelmed by multiple debilitating symptoms, and others are impulsive, bizarre, and unpredictable. Greater understanding and a direct method of acquiring LAD suicide statistics is needed. It is suggested that medical examiners, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other epidemiological organizations proactively evaluate the association between LAD and suicide.

For more on psychiatric Lyme & TBI’s:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2015/10/18/psychiatric-lymemsids/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/01/17/lymemsids-and-psychiatric-illness/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/04/11/hidden-invaders-infections-can-trigger-immune-attacks-on-kids-brains-provoking-devastating-psychiatric-disorders/

Help Doctors Get Educated on Lyme and Tick Borne Illness

Dear Lyme Disease Advocates and Patients,

As you know, many patients with Lyme disease are not promptly diagnosed and/or appropriately treated for their infection. Although many factors contribute to the problem, in my opinion, the primary cause is that healthcare providers haven’t received adequate training on tick-borne diseases.

Together, we can change that.

LymeCME.info is a website built specifically for the purpose of offering accredited, evidence-based continuing medical education (CME) modules on Lyme and other tick-borne diseases (TBD) for doctors and other healthcare professionals. Doctors will like the convenience of on-demand learning that’s available on PC and mobile devices. The modules I developed for LymeCME provide a concise review of the evidence, highlighting points that are especially relevant to patient care. And, they’re free!

Here’s where you come in.  Because doctors are unlikely to find LymeCME.info on their own, you’ll need to tell them about the site and encourage them to take the various modules. It’s important that you project a positive, helpful attitude when you do this. I’ve included a sample letter that you can personalize. The goal is to keep the message brief and upbeat.  Sample letter: https://www.partnershipfortick-bornediseaseseducation.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/LymeCME-letter-template.pdf

Thank you in advance for your support; working together, we can make a real and vital difference.

Sincerely,
Elizabeth Maloney, MD
President, Partnership for Tick-Borne Diseases Education

Our mailing address is:

Partnership for Tick-borne Diseases Education

25611 W. Comfort Drive

Wyoming, MN 55092

Lee’s Rebuttal to CDC Article in MMWR

Sin Hang Lee also commented about the CDC article in the MMWR which gives 5 anecdotal cases of Chronic Lyme patients who didn’t benefit from IV treatment.

 

Sin Hang Lee, director of Milford Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory stated this:

Marzec and colleagues presented five “chronic Lyme disease” patients who did not benefit from additional antibiotic treatment when the diagnoses of “chronic Lyme disease” were made on the basis of clinical symptoms and signs (www.cdc.gov/lyme/diagnosistesting/) or by unvalidated tests. The authors have not presented evidence to show that chronic Lyme disease patients with borrelial spirochetemia proven by culture or by gene sequencing do not benefit from additional antibiotic treatment. In medicine, certain chronic infections, such as subacute bacterial endocarditis, may require intravenous or prolonged antibiotic treatment [1] in spite of its potential side effects.

The CDC should give the practitioners a case definition of Lyme disease, as for Ebola and Zika.

Conflicts of Interest: Sin Hang Lee, MD is the director of Milford Molecular Diagnostics Laboratory specialized in developing DNA sequencing-based diagnostic tests.

References 1. Hoen B. Epidemiology and antibiotic treatment of infective endocarditis: an update. Heart 2006 ;92 :1694-700. Review.

LDN Reduced Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in FM After Eight Weeks

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/28536359/

Reduced Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines after Eight Weeks of Low-Dose Naltrexone for Fibromyalgia.

Parkitny L, et al. Biomedicines. 2017.

Authors

Biomedicines. 2017 Apr 18;5(2). pii: E16. doi: 10.3390/biomedicines5020016.

Abstract

Fibromyalgia (FM) is a complex, multi-symptom condition that predominantly affects women. The majority of those affected are unlikely to gain significant symptomatic control from the few treatments that are approved for FM. In this 10-week, single-blind, crossover trial we tested the immune effects of eight weeks of oral administration of low-dose naltrexone (LDN). We enrolled eight women with an average age of 46 years, symptom severity of 62 out of 100, and symptom duration of 14 years. We found that LDN was associated with reduced plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-15, IL-17A, IL-27, interferon (IFN)-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-α, TGF-β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). We also found a 15% reduction of FM-associated pain and an 18% reduction in overall symptoms. The findings of this pilot trial suggest that LDN treatment in fibromyalgia is associated with a reduction of several key pro-inflammatory cytokines and symptoms. The potential role of LDN as an atypical anti-inflammatory medication should be explored further.

**This is important for everyone, but particularly Lyme/MSIDS patients who are either misdiagnosed with FM or have symptoms of it due to a pathogen infection.  Either way, it reduces cytokines and every chronically infected person could benefit from that.
I’m a big proponent and believer in LDN. It was certainly a game-changer for me.  For more information:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/12/18/ldn/

 

Michigan Study Finds Anti-Zika Chemicals Impact Infant Motor Skills

http://www.ns.umich.edu/new/releases/24890-chemicals-used-to-combat-zika-agricultural-pests-impact-motor-skills-in-infants

June 8, 2017  Laurel Thomas Gnagey:  Michigan News

Researchers at the U-M School of Public Health and U-M Center for Human Growth and Development tested children in China and found exposure to the chemical naled via their mothers during pregnancy was associated with 3-4 percent lower fine motor skills scores at age 9 months for those in the top 25 percent of naled exposure, compared to those in the lowest 25 percent of exposure. Infants exposed to chlorpyrifos scored 2-7 percent lower on a range of key gross and fine motor skills.

Girls appeared to be more sensitive to the negative effects of the chemicals than boys.

Naled is one of the chemicals being used in several U.S. states to combat the mosquito that transmits Zika. Chlorpyrifos, around since the 1960s, is used on vegetables, fruit and other crops to control pests.

Both are insecticides called organophosphates, a class of chemicals that includes nerve agents like sarin gas. They inhibit an enzyme involved in the nerve signaling process, paralyzing insects and triggering respiratory failure. However, they may adversely impact health through other mechanisms at lower exposure levels that are commonly encountered in the environment.

“Motor delays in infancy may be predictive of developmental problems later in childhood,” said first author Monica Silver, graduate student research assistant and research fellow in the School of Public Health Department of Environmental Health Sciences. “The findings may help inform policy as the debate over use of these chemicals continues.”

The only studies to date on naled health impacts have taken place in occupational settings, not with exposure in the general population, Silver says. Previous chlorpyrifos research has found ties to delayed motor development in children and a host of health issues for those who handle the chemical, including nausea, dizziness and convulsions.

**Comment**

This is another great example of a myopic view on a problem to the detriment of public health.  Much like the Lyme vaccine which uses OspA and causes chronic Lyme symptoms in many people, many pesticides are wrecking havoc on public health as noted by the University of Michigan. and many, many other sources.

Why?

http://www.naturalnews.com/055293_Zika_virus_birth_defects_profits.html  Scott Adams, author of Natural News, has come up with five industries with agendas that stand to gain from a Zika scare including: chemical companies, vaccine makers, biotech industry (GMO mosquitoes), and Planned Parenthood and the condom industry since the disease is believed to be spread sexually.

Let us not forget governmental agencies and researchers as they typically obtain grant money for their research that is highly dependent upon what I call “curb appeal.”  In other words, the best way to get money in the 21st century is to whoop something up using the media to obtain funding as well as career advancement, prestige, and essentially power.  http://www.pewinternet.org/2015/02/15/how-scientists-engage-public/  Even though nearly 80% of scientists acknowledge that science news coverage doesn’t distinguish between well-founded and not well-founded findings.

For a refresher of how it all went down with Zika:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/12/21/how-zika-got-the-blame/ Despite the CDC initially denying a causal link between Zika and microcephally, CDC authors then plopped one paper into a formula of which the paper only met 3 of 7 criteria and they did an about face.  

For more on Zika: https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/03/08/fixation-on-zikapolio/
https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/07/17/zika-in-the-land-of-oz/
https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/10/26/zika-puzzling-scientists/
https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/03/04/health-policy-recap/
https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/04/08/zika-ebola-zombies-and-the-cdc/

What can really cause microcephally, not to mention cancer?

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/11/14/naled-causes-microcephaly/  

Naled’s breakdown product DICHLORVOS (another organophosphate insecticide) interferes with prenatal brain development. In laboratory animals, exposure for just 3 days during pregnancy when the brain is growing quickly reduced brain size 15 percent. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8065512

DICHLORVOS also causes cancer, according to the International Agency for Research on Carcinogens. In laboratory tests, it caused leukemia and pancreatic cancer. Two independent studies have shown that children exposed to household “no-pest” strips containing dichlorvos have a higher incidence of brain cancer than unexposed children.

Aerial applications of naled can drift up to one-half mile. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, naled is moderately to highly toxic to birds and fish. It also reduced egg production and hatching success in tests with birds and reduced growth in tests with juvenile fish. convulsions, paralysis, and death.”

Membrane Lipid Replacement for Lyme/MSIDS

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0005273617301293

Available online 18 April 2017  Garth L. Nicolsona, , , E-mail author,Michael E. Ash

Abstract

Membrane Lipid Replacement is the use of functional, oral supplements containing mixtures of cell membrane glycerolphospholipids, plus fructooligosaccharides (for protection against oxidative, bile acid and enzymatic damage) and antioxidants, in order to safely replace damaged, oxidized, membrane phospholipids and restore membrane, organelle, cellular and organ function. Defects in cellular and intracellular membranes are characteristic of all chronic medical conditions, including cancer, and normal processes, such as aging. Once the replacement glycerolphospholipids have been ingested, dispersed, complexed and transported, while being protected by fructooligosaccharides and several natural mechanisms, they can be inserted into cell membranes, lipoproteins, lipid globules, lipid droplets, liposomes and other carriers. They are conveyed by the lymphatics and blood circulation to cellular sites where they are endocytosed or incorporated into or transported by cell membranes. Inside cells the glycerolphospholipids can be transferred to various intracellular membranes by lipid globules, liposomes, membrane-membrane contact or by lipid carrier transfer. Eventually they arrive at their membrane destinations due to ‘bulk flow’ principles, and there they can stimulate the natural removal and replacement of damaged membrane lipids while undergoing further enzymatic alterations. Clinical trials have shown the benefits of Membrane Lipid Replacement in restoring mitochondrial function and reducing fatigue in aged subjects and chronically ill patients. Recently Membrane Lipid Replacement has been used to reduce pain and other symptoms as well as removing hydrophobic chemical contaminants, suggesting that there are additional new uses for this safe, natural medicine supplement. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Lipid Therapy: Drugs Targeting Biomembranes edited by Pablo Escríba-Ruíz.

The article also noted that while glycerolphospholipid absorption in the upper intestines was over 90%, after a large meal, and transported into the blood within 6 hours, dietary MLR polyunsaturated phospholipids are oxidized and degraded during storage, ingestion, digestion, and absorption and need to be protected from acid degradation in the gut and bile salts and hydrolysis from the pancreas and gut microflora in the small intestines.  The researchers found an answer to this problem by complexing MLR phospholipids with specific fructooligosaccharides (Inulins), which protect from oxidation and high temps, acidity, and phospholipases and bile salts.

Plants such as legumes or cabbage are good sources for MLR supplementation but in order to get a daily dose of 1.8 g of membrane phospholipids you’d have to have an intake of 15 kg of beans!

The most convenient, efficient, safe and cost effective method of membrane phospholipid administration in humans has been the use of daily oral lecithin supplements [1]; [2]; [3] ;  [6]. Most oral lecithin supplements are rather crude soy, egg yolk or marine preparations that lack oxidation, bile and phosphatase protection. In addition, most of these oral supplements have not been carefully analyzed for phospholipid composition, and in particular for lipid degradation products. However, there are oral MLR phospholipid supplements, such as NTFactor® and NTFactor Lipids®, that fulfill the requirements for efficacy, oxidation and degradation protection, safety and convenience [1]; [2] ;  [3]. The NTFactor® lipid supplements, and their use in clinical studies, will be discussed in more detail in 8, 9, 10 ;  11. NTFactor®, which also contains probiotic bacteria, growth media and other ingredients, and NTFactor Lipids®, without these additives, come in several oral forms, but almost all contain from 1–2 g of phospholipids per dose [1]; [2] ;  [3]. The recommended optimal daily oral dose of NTFactor Lipids® for most clinical conditions has been estimated at 2–4 g per day, and more recently at least 4 g per day, whereas its anti-aging use has been proposed at 2 g per day [2]. Some updates in these recommendations will be discussed in Section 12.

A table in the article shows uses for MLR supplements such as fatigue, infections, autoimmune, and chemical detox and revised dose levels.  These are issues nearly every Lyme/MSIDS patient has.  The dosages for these issues are upwards of 4g/day, showing the intensive mitochrondrial damage these issues cause in the body.

Due to intense detoxification efforts by the liver, many Lyme/MSIDS patients have high liver titers.  The good news is that patients with advanced liver cirrhosis were given oral MLR phospholipids and after just 3 months had normal blood results for liver function.  They are also safe to use during pregnancy and have in fact been used in high risk pregnancies with success.

**The authors are part-time consultants to Nutritional Therapeutics, Inc. and Allergy Research Group, Inc.

 

 

First Report of Dwarf Deer Tick

https://entomologytoday.org/2017/06/07/first-report-of-dwarf-deer-tick-comes-as-overall-population-soars/   June 7, 2017 by

The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station has identified a dwarf deer tick, which is identical to a typical adult female deer tick but is half the size.

Oh goody, if ticks weren’t hard enough to see, now they can be harder to find.

A typical deer tick is 3 millimeters, whereas the dwarf deer tick is just 1.5 millimeters, with the nymph tinier yet.

The finding, reported in the Journal of Medical Entomology, https://academic.oup.com/jme/article/3859660/The-First-Evidence-of-Nanism-in-Ixodes-Ixodes states that additional studies of teratology (abnormal development) in ticks and the implications in disease transmission are needed.