Archive for the ‘Bartonella’ Category

Endocarditis Caused by Bartonella Quintana, A Rare Case in the U.S.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6667705/

. 2019; 17: e00533.
Published online 2019 Apr 6. doi: 10.1016/j.idcr.2019.e00533
PMCID: PMC6667705
PMID: 31384552

Endocarditis caused by Bartonella Quintana, a rare case in the United States

Abstract

Bartonella quintana is a relatively rare cause of endocarditis in the United States (USA). Historically it was linked with trench fever, but cardiac involvement seems to be more prevalent recently. There are some known risk factors associated with Bartonella quintana endocarditis such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, alcoholism, homelessness and poor hygiene. We report a case of 37-year-old African man, with culture negative endocarditis, emboli and rising B. quintana and B. henselae IgG titers. B. quintana DNA was subsequently detected from the mitral valve sample with 16S rRNA gene and ribC primer sets. Eventually, blood culture for B. quintana was positive after 21 days. Patient was successfully treated with doxycycline and gentamicin. There have been a few cases of B. quintana endocarditis in the USA and most of them were associated with HIV infection, homelessness or alcoholism. The case reported here highlights the importance of high clinical suspicious for Bartonella species in blood culture negative endocarditis in the USA in appropriate setting and will help to increase awareness among physicians for early diagnosis and treatment.

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**Comment**

A few points of interest:

  • Patient’s chief complaints:  progressive shortness of breath, chest painoccasional non-drenching night sweats, fatigue, unintentional ten pound weight loss, and intermittent sharp chest pain radiating to the neck
  • Past medical history significant for latent tuberculosis infection and treatment completed 3 months prior to the presentation
  • While living in the Democratic Republic of Congo before migrating to Indiana, patient had a cow at his home and used to drink raw cow’s milk
  • Had Janeway Lesions on hands & feet http://www.healthgala.info/2017/08/Janeway-lesion-Pictures-Definition-Symptoms-Causes-Treatment.html

Janeway lesion Pictures, Definition, Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

Janeway lesion Pictures, Definition, Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

  • Was considered immunocompetent 

For more:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/01/04/endocarditis-consider-bartonella/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/09/28/bartonella-infective-endocarditis-with-dissemination-a-case-report-literature-review/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/08/12/tick-borne-pathogens-bartonella-spp-borrelia-burgdorferi-sensu-lato-coxiella-burnetii-rickettsia-spp-may-trigger-endocarditis/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/04/25/case-of-endocarditis-caused-by-bartonella-after-mitral-valve-repair/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/07/10/infective-endocarditis-associated-with-bartonella-henselae-a-case-series/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/04/24/human-bartonellosis-an-underappreciated-public-health-problem/

 

 

 

 

 

Animal Health & Nutrition Forum – “Pets & Parasites: Diseases Transmitted by Fleas and Ticks and Their Impact on Animal and Human Health”

https://www.ncbiotech.org/events/pets-and-parasites-diseases-transmitted-fleas-and-ticks-and-their-impact-animal-and-human

“Pets and Parasites: Diseases transmitted by fleas and ticks and their impact on animal and human health” – An Animal Health and Nutrition Forum

Fleas and ticks are the most common ectoparasites (external parasites) of dogs and cats worldwide. In addition to just being a nuisance, fleas are responsible for flea allergy dermatitis and Bartonellosis while ticks are important vectors of diseases that affect humans and animals. The geographic distribution of ticks is changing due to climate change, de-foresting, and the changing living and migrating patterns of deer, birds, and rodents. Ticks are in virtually all parts of the United States, including some urban areas, and many parts of the world. Tick-transmitted diseases include: Lyme disease, Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Babesiosis, and Hepatozoonosis.

Featured Speakers:

Dr. Edward B. Breitschwerdt
Edward B. Breitschwerdt,
Ph.D., NCSU College of
Veterinary Medicine
Dr. Kerrie Powell
Kerrie Powell, Ph.D.,
Cambrex

 

 

 

The AH&N EG forum will discuss Bartonellosis as well as outline the discovery and development of molecules that treat flea and tick infestations on companion animals.

 

 

Agenda

4:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Registration

5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Presentations

6:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Networking & Refreshments

Directions/Parking

Parking is free

Registration

RSVP is required to reserve your seat.

  • NCBiotech
    15 TW Alexander Drive
    RTP, NC  27709
  • FREE

An Unexpected Case of Bartonella Alsatica Prosthetic Vascular Graft Infection

https://www.dovepress.com/an-unexpected-case-of-bartonella-alsatica-prosthetic-vascular-graft-in-peer-reviewed-article-IDR

An unexpected case of Bartonella alsatica prosthetic vascular graft infection

Authors Puges M, Ménard A, Berard X, Geneviève M, Pinaquy JB, Edouard S, Pereyre S, Cazanave C

Published 7 August 2019 Volume 2019:12 Pages 2453—2456

DOI https://doi.org/10.2147/IDR.S206805

Abstract: Bartonella alsatica is a wild rabbit pathogen causing bacteremia rarely reported in humans, with only three cases published so far, including one lymphadenitis and two endocarditis cases. Here, we report the case of a 66-year-old man who suffered from acute renal failure due to a membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) showed diffuse FDG uptake around the aortobifemoral graft with no indication of infection. A white blood cell scan showed an accumulation of labeled neutrophils on the left femoral part of the graft. The patient underwent surgery and an abscess around the left iliac part of the graft was found intraoperatively. Intraoperative samples were all negative, but 16S rRNA gene-based PCR was positive, and the sequence was positioned among the Bartonella species cluster. Specific PCRs targeting groEL/hsp60, rpoB and gltA genes were performed and led to the identification of B. alsatica. Accordingly, indirect immunofluorescence serological analyses were positive for Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana. The patient had a history of regularly hunting wild rabbits. He was treated with 100 mg of doxycycline twice a day for six months and his renal function significantly improved with no sign of persistent infection. This case highlights the contribution of serology assays and molecular-based methods in prosthetic vascular graft infection diagnosis.________________

For more: https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/01/03/bartonella-treatment/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/02/27/advanced-imaging-found-bartonella-around-pic-line/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/05/09/bartonella-transmitted-to-children-at-birth-causing-chronic-infections/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/06/06/high-titers-of-bartonella-found-in-patients-with-musculoskeletal-complaints/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/04/24/human-bartonellosis-an-underappreciated-public-health-problem/

Tick-borne Pathogens Bartonella spp., Borrelia Burgdorferi Sensu Lato, Coxiella Burnetii & Rickettsia Spp. May Trigger Endocarditis

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31374162/

2019 Jul;28(7):957-963. doi: 10.17219/acem/94159.

Tick-borne pathogens Bartonella spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Coxiella burnetii and Rickettsia spp. may trigger endocarditis.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Infections caused by tick-borne pathogens such as Bartonella spp., Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., Coxiella burnetii and Rickettsia spp. are capable of causing serious lesions of the mitral and aortic valves, leading to a need for valve replacement.

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of the study was to determine whether such cases are sporadic or frequent. An additional goal was to establish effective diagnostic methods to detect these infections.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

The study involved 148 patients undergoing valve replacement. Blood samples were drawn for serological testing. Samples of the removed mitral and aortic valves were tested with PCR and immunohistochemical staining.

RESULTS:

Specific antibodies to

  • Bartonella spp. were detected in 47 patients (31.7%) and in 1 of the healthy controls (1%) (p < 0.05)
  • B. burgdorferi spirochetes were found in 18 of the patients (12.2%) and in 6 blood donors from the control group (5.8%) (p < 0.1)
  • Rickettsia spp. were detected in 12 (8.1%) 
  • C. burnetii phase I and II antigens in the serum of 1 patient. All the participants in the control group were seronegative to C. burnetii and Rickettsia spp. antigens.
  • PCR tests for detection of Bartonella spp., B. burgdorferi s.l., C. burnetii and Rickettsia spp. DNA in the valve samples were all negative.

Inflammation foci with mononuclear lymphoid cells in the aortic and mitral valves were seen in sections stained with hematoxiline and eozine. In sections dyed using the indirect immunofluorescence method with hyperimmune sera, Bartonella spp. and Rickettsia spp. were found.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results obtained indicate that laboratory diagnostics for patients with heart disorders should be expanded to include tests detecting tick-borne zoonoses such as bartonelloses, Lyme borreliosis, rickettsioses and Q fever.

________________

**Comment**

This article shows that tick borne pathogens are common with patients needing heart valve replacements. Unfortunately, testing still isn’t accurate. Finding antibodies, authorities would argue, doesn’t mean a person has symptoms; however, this issue desperately needs further research as finding antibodies does indicate the presence of pathogens.

A point to be made about the low percentage of those testing positive for Lyme might be due to the fact they only tested one strain: Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato.  There are 300 strains worldwide and 100 in the U.S. (and counting).

Bartonella is similar in the fact that a recent article pointed out that a 14-year-old boy with PANS caused by Bartonella henselae infection was NOT seropositive. Only one of the three blood samples tested positive before culturing and only two tested positive after culturing. A single blood draw might have missed confirming a diagnosis of bartonellosis.

How many doctors are going to hunt these infections to ground? How many have the time and doggedness it requires to find them? It’s far more likely they will take the results from a singular test, close the book, and move onto the next patient.

We desperately need accurate tests that pick up ALL the pathogens.

 

 

 

Multimodal Imaging of Two Unconventional Cases of Bartonella Neuroretinitis

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31348120

2019 Jul 16. doi: 10.1097/ICB.0000000000000893. [Epub ahead of print]

MULTIMODAL IMAGING OF TWO UNCONVENTIONAL CASES OF BARTONELLA NEURORETINITIS.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To report two cases of cat-scratch fever with atypical posterior segment manifestations.

METHODS:

Two cases were retrospectively reviewed.

RESULTS:

  • A 27-year-old woman presented with painless blurring of central vision in her left eye. Clinical examination revealed a small focal area of retinitis within the macula associated with a subtle macular star. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography showed a hyper-reflective inner retinal lesion in addition to subretinal and intraretinal fluid as well as hyperreflective foci within the outer plexiform layer. Serology was positive for anti-B. henselae IgM (titer 1:32).
  • A 34-year-old woman presented with painless loss of vision in both eyes associated with headaches and pain with extraocular movement. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography depicted subretinal fluid, intraretinal fluid, and hyperreflective deposits within the outer plexiform layer. A focal collection of vitreous cell was observed overlying the optic nerve in the left eye. Bilateral disk leakage was identified on fluorescein angiography. Serology revealed high-titer anti-B. henselae antibodies (IgM titers 1:32, IgG titers 1:256).

CONCLUSION:

Our cases highlight the necessity of recognizing more unusual posterior segment presentations of ocular bartonellosis. Multimodal retinal imaging including spectral-domain optical coherence tomography may help better characterize lesions.

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For more:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/07/28/treatment-strategies-for-neuroretinitis-due-to-bartonella-current-options-emerging-therapies/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/07/10/bartonella-henselae-neuroretinitis-in-patients-without-cat-scratch/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/07/21/bartonella-and-neuroretinitis/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/05/10/bartonella-neuroretinitis-not-atypical/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/04/08/case-series-bartonella-ocular-manifestations/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/02/27/advanced-imaging-found-bartonella-around-pic-line/  Bartonella, like Lyme, can be persistent causing chronic infection.

 

Bartonella & The Brain

https://www.galaxydx.com/bartonella-and-the-brain/

Bartonella and the Brain

 

 

 

Top 5 Bartonella Species of Human Significance

https://www.cliniciansbrief.com/article/top-5-bartonella-species-human-significance?

Top 5 Bartonella Species of Human Significance

Radford G. Davis, DVM, MPH, DACVPM, Iowa State University

INFECTIOUS DISEASE

JULY 2019|PEER REVIEWED

In short, there are 17 species of Bartonella known to cause human disease; however, new species are continuously being discovered. It is also believed to be significantly underreported. Please go to link above for entire article.

The bad 5:

  • B henselae
  • B quintana
  • B bacilliformis
  • B koehlerae
  • B vinsonii subsp berkhoffii

For more:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/01/03/bartonella-treatment/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/04/24/human-bartonellosis-an-underappreciated-public-health-problem/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/07/13/suspected-insect-and-arthropod-vectors-for-bartonella-species-galaxy/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/05/05/good-news-for-bartonella-patients-identification-of-fda-approved-drugs-with-higher-activity-than-current-front-line-drugs/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/02/27/advanced-imaging-found-bartonella-around-pic-line/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/07/13/is-it-bartonella/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/05/09/bartonella-transmitted-to-children-at-birth-causing-chronic-infections/