Archive for the ‘Gut Health’ Category

Prebiotics & Probiotics: Do They Really Work For Gut Health?

https://vitalplan.com/blog/do-prebiotics-and-probiotics-really-work-for-gut-health?utm_campaign=September+15+VP+newsletter%3A+Pre%2Fprobiotic

Prebiotics-and-Probiotics-for-Gut-Health

Prebiotics + Probiotics: Do They Really Work for Gut Health?

by Beth Janes | Posted September 12, 2018

Prebiotics and probiotics have been trending for a while now, but lately they’re getting even more attention — and showing up in more and more products, from packaged foods (pizza crust!) to topical skin-care products. It’s no surprise consumers are interested: As scientists learn more about the trillions of bacteria that inhabit our bodies and the role they play in our health, some have touted beneficial bugs as a cure-all for digestive distress and other health problems.

But there are still many unknowns among researchers, and a lot of questions and confusion among the rest of us about what prebiotics and probiotics are, and what exactly they can and can’t do, says Bill Rawls, M.D., medical director of Vital Plan. Here, he answers some of the questions he hears most often.

What’s the difference between prebiotics and probiotics?

“Prebiotics are types of fiber, such as inulin, that are known to promote the growth of healthy microflora in the gut,” Dr. Rawls says. In other words, prebiotics feed the good bacteria already living in your gut, which allows them to multiply, thrive, and better do their job of keeping you healthy.

Probiotics, on the other hand, are actual strains of friendly bacteria or yeast that populate your gut. Ideally, probiotics maintain or restore a healthy balance of microflora, either by keeping bad bacteria in check or giving a hand to the good bacteria so they can function and flourish.

What are the best sources of both?

For prebiotics, the best sources are vegetables, hands down, Dr. Rawls says. Certain veggies such as sunchokes, mushrooms, garlic, artichokes, dandelion leaves, onions, and chicory contain high amounts of inulin, but you needn’t be overly selective.

More than anything else, eating a range of vegetables will cultivate the growth of normal bacteria,” Dr. Rawls says. “Because it’s not just about feeding the good bacteria: All vegetable fiber helps ensure normal digestion and that you’re evacuating the gut properly and regularly, which prevents the buildup of harmful bacteria.”

As for probiotics, fermented foods such as sauerkraut, kimchi, kombucha, kefir, and yogurt are naturally rich sources of live and active cultures (as well as digestive enzymes, which may be equally important for normal digestion). “Humans have eaten lots of different kinds of fermented foods throughout our history, for many thousands of years,” says Dr. Rawls. “That’s where the original idea for probiotic supplements came from.”

Research also suggests real-food sources of probiotics may be more effective than probiotic supplements at maintaining a diverse and healthy gut microbiome, the collection of microbes that inhabit your digestive tract. That could be due to the bacteria themselves, or the fact that the foods also contain a plethora of other healthy nutrients, including prebiotics, Dr. Rawls says.

Can prebiotics and probiotics improve digestive symptoms?

Prebiotics do contribute to a happy, symptom-free gut in the sense that they serve as fuel for the good microbes that help keep the digestive process humming. So while on their own they don’t do much, you absolutely need prebiotics for gut microbiome support and healthy digestion. Natural foods are by far the best source — supplements aren’t necessary if you’re eating a healthy, balanced, and veggie-rich diet.

As for probiotics’ ability to improve digestive symptoms, the answer is possibly. Probiotic capsules seem to help most when they’re used short-term for acute GI upset (diarrhea, stomach cramps) from eating contaminated food, like a batch of chicken salad that sat out for too long, for example, Dr. Rawls says. They may also help protect your microflora while taking antibiotics, which kill off good bacteria along with the bad, or if you contract C. difficile, a dangerous bacterial infection that causes diarrhea and inflammation of the gut.

“Most probiotic supplements contain bacterial strains of lactobacilli or bifidobacteria, or a favorable yeast called saccharomyces boulardii,” Dr. Rawls says. “Those are the ones that seem to show the most benefit.”

As for other digestive conditions, it’s hit or miss, he says. “The gut contains 20,000-plus strains of bacteria, and bacterial counts in the trillions. A probiotic supplement may be just a drop in the bucket, so getting an effect can be really hard.”

Further complicating things is that the mix of bacteria in people’s guts varies widely — in fact, it’s probably unique to you, like a fingerprint. What’s more, your microbiome can change based on your diet or lifestyle, or due to illness, so what might work for one person with a certain condition or symptom might not won’t work for another, Dr. Rawls says.

In addition, while different brands may use the same species of bacteria (lactobacillus, for example), they usually contain slightly different strains. So unless human studies on that one specific strain or bacteria blend shows a benefit on your particular health concern, it’s difficult to know for sure whether it will help you.

For all those reasons, published research is also mixed. Some is promising; for example, one meta-analysis of 15 studies published in the World Journal of Gastroenterology reported that probiotic supplements reduced pain and symptom severity in those with irritable bowel syndrome compared with placebo.

But other research, especially in healthy adults, shows little benefit from taking probiotics. And in fact, it may even introduce new symptoms: One small study of 30 subjects, published in the journal Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology, showed that taking a lot of probiotics can result in symptoms like brain fog and bloating in those using them for GI complaints.

Still, many experts tend to agree that the supplements, when taken in moderate doses, pose little risk. “I think it’s fine if someone wants to try taking probiotics; the potential for harm is low,” Dr. Rawls says. “Some people — maybe 15 to 20 percent of folks – may even gain benefit from them long-term.”

The newest trend in probiotics is customized formulations that are said to be based on your unique microbiome needs. Companies develop them after testing your stool sample for different microbes, and then selecting probiotics they say you lack in your gut. “While it may be a step in the right direction, the science and technology have a long way to go before this is a viable option,” says Dr. Rawls.

If you want to try supplements, he suggests taking them daily for at least three months and keeping a journal to see if you notice any improvements. If you won’t remember to take them daily, however, don’t even bother. Because the strains of bacteria in supplements are not the same ones already living in your gut, it takes a few days for them to populate and build up in your gut, and then you must continue to deliver them via supplements to maintain any activity.

What are some alternatives to probiotics for microbiome balance?

Step one is eating a mostly plant-based diet that includes plenty of fermented foods. Getting plenty of sleep and exercise and keeping stress in check are also key, as too little sleep and activity and too much angst contribute to overgrowth of bad bacteria.

Beyond that, Dr. Rawls says herbs and botanicals are more reliably effective and beneficial than probiotic supplements in the long-term. A few to key ones to reach for:

  • Chlorella, a type of green algae, is thought to be one of the most nutrient-dense foods available. It contains chlorella growth factor (CGF), a complex of proteins, vitamins, and sugars that works with fiber in the GI tract to promote the growth of healthy intestinal flora. It also contains chlorophyll, a potent antioxidant that binds to toxins and helps remove them from the body. “Chlorella is known for detoxification, but I’ve found that it does wonders for promoting normal GI function,” Dr. Rawls says.
  • Berberine, a compound found in several bitter herbs and other plants that’s well known for helping to balance the gut microflora. It’s been used for centuries to address intestinal disorders and digestive problems. “Berberine works very nicely because it stays predominantly in the GI tract, isn’t absorbed, and it’s active against gut pathogens,” Dr. Rawls says. That helps tip the scales toward healthy bacteria, keeping the bad guys from taking over.
  • Andrographis is likewise known to help support a healthy microbiome, plus it offers immune system-supporting capabilities. Native to India, andrographis can help promote good bacteria in the gut for better total balance, Dr. Rawls says.

The bottom line: Keeping your gut microbiome balanced is vital for maintaining healthy digestion, promoting sleep and immune strength, and more – and natural approaches are the best way to achieve that balance, says Dr. Rawls. Feel free to give probiotic supplements a try if you like, but be sure to track your progress to make sure it’s worth the money. And know that supplementing with the right herbs and botanicals, along with eating plenty of natural sources of both prebiotics and probiotics, will likely deliver the results you seek much more quickly.

_________________

**Comment**

My LLMD has noticed a stark contrast in patients from when before he started using probiotics in their treatment regimen and after.  He states it’s important to use a reputable lab and a refrigerated probiotic/prebiotic with many strains.  Refrigerated ones should be “live” cultures.

In all the years we’ve been in and out of treatment with antibiotics, we’ve never had GI issues and much of that is do to a low/no sugar diet and good pre and probiotics.

 

What’s the Best Diet for Lyme Disease? Dr. Rawls

What’s the Best Diet for Lyme Disease?

Published on Aug 8, 2018
What are the best foods to eat and avoid to ease the fatigue, pain, brain fog and other symptoms of Lyme disease?
Dr. Bill Rawls shares his three key Lyme diet guidelines.
Written transcript:
Question: What’s the Best Diet for Lyme Disease?

Dr. Rawls here with some tips on diet.

When you look at any kind of chronic illness —Lyme disease or any other illness — gut dysfunction is always a component, and a lot of it stems from eating a poor diet. Just the process of digestion itself can cause gut dysfunction. So diet is really, really important.

We could go on for hours and hours about diet, but I’ve tried to boil it down to three basic guidelines. If you can adopt these three habits, then you will change your life from a diet point of view. You’ll feel better, and you’ll start getting well faster. Diet is really key.

Guideline #1: Eat more vegetables than anything else. Vegetables are just such an important component of diet. Vegetables supply the kind of fiber that keeps our gut and digestive process hydrated. It’s the kind of fiber that feeds the right bacteria. It’s the kind of fiber that helps pull toxins out of your body.

Vegetable fiber is very different than grain fiber, plus there are all the other antioxidants and wonderful things that come in vegetables. That’s my top rule for anything that is related to diet. No matter what diet you follow, the number one rule is, eat more vegetables than anything else.

Fruits? They’re also pretty darn good. They have a lot of the same antioxidants and good fiber and everything else, but also a lot more sugar. Temperate fruits like apples and blueberries are really good.

Guideline #2: Try to minimize the processed food. This is one that I struggle with every day, too. When I go to the grocery store, my target is not reading the labels on food, but instead I shoot for a goal of trying to make 90% of my food come without a label. Instead I buy lots of fruits and vegetables and fresh foods that I take home and prepare myself. Being part of the food preparation process is a wonderful part of life, and of being part of the food environment.

If you can, shoot for a goal of looking at your cart and saying, “90% of this doesn’t have a label on it,” or, “It’s basically a single ingredient like a carton of milk or a tub of butter.” And then avoid foods where you’re looking at the label and thinking, “Wow, I don’t understand some of these ingredients on this label.” Those are better left on the shelf.

Now, it’s hard to do that with everything. I don’t make my own mayonnaise, I don’t make my own ketchup, so there are certain things I buy. If you can aim for that 90% goal, you’re going to cut out a lot of those high-carb processed food products that are harming people.

The high-carb processed food products derived from wheat, corn, and soybeans are a leading cause of illness in our country today. If you make that rule of making your own food from fresh ingredients, you’re going to cut all of that processed stuff out at the beginning.

Guideline #3: Eat healthy protein and fat sources. Top of my list for protein is predominantly fish and eggs. Right now, the most cost-effective and available source of good protein on the planet is fresh wild-caught salmon from Alaska. It’s remarkably inexpensive compared to other protein sources. So, I eat healthy fish and eggs.

I also eat some poultry. I occasionally eat red meat, but not very often because of the high fat content and the other things that come with it. So if you can, shoot for good, healthy protein and fat sources.

Another great fat source includes olive oil. That’s my main cooking oil, but I don’t cook it at a high temperature so I don’t burn the oil. I eat a lot of avocados. I use a little bit of ghee (clarified butter) in my cooking because it adds another dimension to the cooking that’s really special, and ghee doesn’t burn when you heat it on the stove. It doesn’t disrupt the fats like some of your refined vegetable oils.

Those are the top three things. If you can really focus on those things alone, you will do wonders for your diet and well-being.

_________________

More on Diet:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/05/15/overview-of-anti-inflammatory-diets/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/04/18/comparative-diets-to-address-chronic-inflammation/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/02/03/do-these-popular-diets-make-you-nutrient-deficient/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/01/03/the-invisible-universe-of-the-human-microbiome-msm/

 

 

Acute Abdominal Pain Caused by Neuroborreliosis

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/30040309/

Acute abdominal pain caused by neuroborreliosis

Dobbe ASM, et al. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2018.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Lyme disease is a multisystem disease which can present itself in several ways. When the nervous system is involved, it is called Lyme neuroborreliosis. Both central and peripheral nervous systems can be affected.

CASE DESCRIPTION: A 39-year-old man visited the emergency department multiple times with severe abdominal-pain attacks with motoric unrest. Extensive diagnostic work-up was done, which was initially inconclusive. Lyme neuroborreliosis was suspected when he developed a facial-nerve palsy during admission; the abdominal pain was thought to be caused by thoracic radiculoneuropathy. Serologic testing for antibodies against Borrelia burgdorferi was positive, confirming the diagnosis. The patient was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone.

CONCLUSION: This case shows abdominal pain being caused by radiculoneuropathy at thoracic level, an uncommon presentation of Lyme neuroborreliosis. Often, this diagnosis is only made when neurological paralysis occurs. Information regarding skin lesions or a recent tick bite can lead to earlier recognition of the diagnosis.

________________

**Comment**

Key statement:  “Often this diagnosis is only made when neurological paralysis occurs.”

How often does that happen?

So all the other sorry suckers who don’t get neurological paralysis won’t be diagnosed.  See why they call this “uncommon” or “rare?”

Until clinicians learn and study the widely variable symptoms and pretty much keep Lyme/MSIDS in the back of their minds at all times, it’s Russian Roulette out here regarding diagnosis.  You may win or you may get the bullet.

I wish I could even count the Lyme/MSIDS patients with “severe abdominal-pain” and “unrest!”  Let’s just say there’s a lot of them!

Radiculonerophathy is when Lyme (borrelia) infects a spinal nerve root and in this patient’s case it was in the thoracic region which gave him abdominal pain.  It all depends upon what nerves are affected.  It could be anywhere.  Extrapolate this throughout the entire spine and you begin to see why thousands of patients are slipping through the cracks.

Under “Neurologic involvement,”  https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/330178-clinical   “Acute radiculoneuritis is reported in 50-85% of cases. Acute onset of motor deficits, severe radicular pain, and sensory loss are commonly seen after 2-4 weeks of infection. Multifocal asymmetric weakness is a common presentation. Although the presentation of inflammatory radiculoneuropathy is often indistinguishable from that of spinal-root compression, involvement of multiple dermatomes in the thorax and a lack of a precipitating injury can aid in diagnosis.”

I don’t think 50-80% of cases is rare, do you?

BTW:  please keep in mind a person can jump throughout the 3 stages of Lyme at at time.  So this idea you have to be infected for weeks to have radiculoneuritis is asinine an unscientific.  Quit saying it.

To understand the Lyme (borrelia) organism better:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/02/13/lyme-disease-treatment/

The Facts About Candida Overgrowth & How to Overcome It

https://www.wakingtimes.com/2018/06/28/the-facts-about-candida-overgrowth-and-how-to-overcome-it/

The Facts About Candida Overgrowth and How to Overcome It

June 28, 2018
candida overgrowth

Anna Hunt, Staff Writer
Waking Times

Candida is an essential fungus, a form of yeast, that lives in the human body. You can find it in the mouth and the intestines. Although it is normal to have some of this fungus in the body, candida can also invade the body beyond what is acceptable. This is called candida overgrowth, and it can have some detrimental health effects.

Candida Overgrowth

Having too much candida in the body can result in several health problems. This includes all types of digestive issues because too much candida can break down the walls of the intestines. In addition, candida overgrowth may cause problems such as depression, lack of energy, and a whole lot of annoying ailments.

When the production of candida in the body is out of control, it can manifest the following problems:

  • Allergies, sensitivities and intolerance to anything or any place that’s damp or moldy.
  • Hay fever and asthma.
  • Higher sensitivity to typical allergens, such as perfumes, smoke, odors, pets, dust, molds, pollen, and other airborne substances.
  • Athletes’ foot or fungus growth on other parts of the body.
  • Low body temperature, resulting on cold hands and feet.
  • Cold-like symptoms, including excessive mucus, as well as flu-like symptoms.
  • Digestive problems, such as constipation, abdominal bloating or pain, acid reflux, and gas.
  • Ringing in the ears (tinnitus), ear infections, ear aches, and abnormal wax build-up.
  • Fatigue, chronic fatigue and general feeling of being drained of energy.
  • Swollen salivary glands, dryness in the mouth, and swollen lymph nodes.
  • Dry or itchy scalp, dandruff, scalp sores, and hair loss.
  • Headaches, migraines, brain fog, and dizziness.
  • Fungal infections of the skin or nails.
  • Joint stiffness, swelling or pain.
  • Lack of appetite.
  • Nasal congestion, postnasal drip, sinus inflammation or infections.
  • Muscle aches and pains, including numbness and tingling, as well as lack of strength and coordination.
  • Dry skin, acne, hives, itching skin, and rashes, including eczema and psoriasis.
  • Sleep problems, such as frequent waking up and restless sleep, as well as insomnia.

FREE ONLINE EVENT: The Candida Summit – register today

The sad part is that candida overgrowth may be easily mistaken for other illnesses. Therefore, medical professionals often treat the symptoms of candida overgrowth, and not the actual problem of candida.

Why Does Candida Get Out of Control?

One of the biggest culprits in candida overgrowth are antibiotics. These medications wipe out all bacteria, including beneficial bacteria in the digestive system. On the other hand, antibiotics do not affect candida, because it is a fungus. As a result, taking antibiotics can create an imbalance in the body.

Now, if the immune system is strong, it can usually handle the effects of candida overgrowth. Unfortunately, many people have a weakened immune system because the typical western diet lacks the nutrients necessary to maintain strong immune function.

The standard diet consists of lots of carbohydrates, hydrogenated oils, trans-fats, sugar, white flour products, and processed foods. In addition, food growers often treat live foods with pesticides and herbicides. As well, they grow these foods in nutrient-depleted soil and radiate them to extend shelf-live.

Consequently, mainstream food choices do not give us the nutrients and healthy probiotic properties necessary to maintain a healthy immune system. As a result, when candida overgrowth happens, the body frequently starts to break down.

Some other factors that may contribute to candida population growing beyond what is healthy are:

  • A diet high in sugar and refined carbohydrates,
  • Drinking too much alcohol, and
  • A stressful lifestyle.

Simple Home Test

The best way to know for sure if you have candida overgrowth is to see a holistic practitioner. However, you can try the following test at home:

  1. Make sure you conduct this test first thing in the morning, before you eat or drink anything.
  2. Fill a glass with room-temperature, filtered water.
  3. Work up some saliva and spit it into the glass of water.
  4. Wait 30 minutes (you may need to wait up to 60 minutes) and check the saliva. If you see string traveling down into the water from the saliva, or if cloudy saliva has sunk to the bottom of the glass, you may have a candida problem.
What You Should Do to Help with Candida Overgrowth

There is a process that you can follow to control candida overgrowth. The important thing is that you execute the following five steps simultaneously:

1. Eliminate sugary foods that feed candida.

These include foods with sweeteners such as honey and fructose. In addition, you may want to limit the intake of fruits because they are high in sugar.

When buying processed meats, always read the ingredients because many contain sugar. In fact, read the ingredients list for all processed foods. You’ll be surprised just how many contain sweeteners. Of course, don’t forget that alcohol and many drinks, like a chai latte and coffee drinks, also have lots of sugar.

2. Strengthen your immune system.

This requires a healthy diet, high in lean proteins, good fats and low carbohydrates. All the foods you eat should be fresh and as natural as possible. This means limit processed foods so you eat fewer additives, heavy metals, pesticides and other food industry chemicals.

Another step in supporting a healthy immune system is to supplement with essential vitamins and minerals. The best way to understand what supplements you need is to ask your healthcare practitioner to administer a blood test. Some typical supplements that typically help fortify the immune system are:

  • Chlorella, a whole food that has many vitamins and minerals. It helps the body purge heavy metals and pesticides.
  • Vitamin C, one of the biggest immune system boosters. Since we get lots of Vitamin C from fruit, you are more likely to be Vitamin C deficient when limiting fruit intake to eliminate sugar from your diet. Vegetables rich in Vitamin C include kale, spinach, and broccoli.
  • Vitamin E, a powerful antioxidant that helps the body fight off infection. Foods rich in vitamin E include nuts, seeds and spinach.

3. Kill off candida overgrowth.

The most effective way to start getting rid of excess candida is to fortify your diet with anti-fungal foods. These include the following:

  • Raw garlic, which contains Sulfur compounds with anti-fungal properties. Fresh garlic is most potent, especially if you first crush it and wait about 10 minutes before consuming it. Of course, you can eat the garlic with a meal to conceal the taste. Just keep it raw.
  • Raw unfiltered apple cider vinegar, preferably Bragg brand. It is best to dilute 1 tablespoon of apple cider vinegar in a glass of room temperature water. Then, drink 30-60 minutes before a meal.
  • Olive leaf extract, which contains a phenolic compound with antiviral and anti-fungal properties.
  • Pau d’arco, which is sold as a tea or as a capsule supplement.

Remember that taking too many supplements can be a strain on the liver, so always check with your healthcare provider if you plan to take several supplements at one time. The ideal way to supplement is to eat a large variety of organic raw vegetables.

4. Introduce more good bacteria into the digestive system.

It is essential that you re-establish the balance of candida and good bacteria in your body. The best way to do this is by eating foods rich in probiotics, or “friendly” bacteria. These are also called probiotics.

Probiotics are present in foods such as yogurt, sauerkraut, kimchi and kombucha. The best way to get high quality probiotics into your system is to make fermented vegetables at home. Probiotic drinks are also very easy to make at home.

As well, you can buy probiotic supplements with a minimum of 50 billion CFUs (colony forming units). If possible, purchase probiotic supplements that require refrigeration.

5. Stay calm and expect the best results from your healing process.

When your body is already compromised, the last thing you need is stress. Stress on its own can make all the other previous four steps ineffective. In fact, it may have been a culprit in candida overgrowth in the first place.

It is important to utilize several stress relieving techniques during your healing process to help you stay calm. These include exercise, meditation and yoga. Also, don’t forget to have some fun!

Another important aspect of staying stress-free is to take it easy on yourself. Do your best following the steps above, and always be patient and kind to yourself.

Finally, having the right mindset is just as important as following a healthy diet. If you believe that your self-care efforts will pay off in improved health, then that will be your end result. There is a reason why the placebo effect works! The mind is one of the most powerful healing tools, so don’t forget to use it.

About the Author
Anna Hunt is writer, yoga instructor, mother of three, and lover of healthy food. She’s the founder of Awareness Junkie, an online community paving the way for better health and personal transformation. She’s also the co-editor at Waking Times, where she writes about optimal health and wellness. Anna spent 6 years in Costa Rica as a teacher of Hatha and therapeutic yoga. She now teaches at Asheville Yoga Center and is pursuing her Yoga Therapy certification. During her free time, you’ll find her on the mat or in the kitchen, creating new kid-friendly superfood recipes.

Sources: 

mindbodygreen.com
nourishedmagazine.com
thecandidadiet.com
preventdisease.com

This article (The Facts About Candida Overgrowth and How to Overcome It) was originally created and published by Waking Times and is published here under a Creative Commonslicense with attribution to Anna Hunt and WakingTimes.com. It may be re-posted freely with proper attribution, author bio, and this copyright statement.

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of Waking Times or its staff.

Jen Springer, 2016

3 Reasons You Can’t Get Rid Of Candida Yeast : HCL, estrogen, thyroid.
  1. The first thing most people miss is restoring the pH to the proper level in the stomach. pH of 2-4. If you don’t get to that level your stomach doesn’t catalyze the pancreas to make enzymes, the gallbladder to make bile, and the proper growth of acid loving good bacteria: acidophilus. Betaine HCL is what you need before any other supplements. SIBO is caused by low stomach HCL. Low good bacteria is from low stomach HCL. The right pH needs to be first before anything else.
  2. Estrogen dominance / imbalance. Many people have estrogen higher than testosterone and progesterone. Even excess environmental estrogenic toxins. This causes high insulin and blood sugar levels. High blood sugar is YEAST FOOD!!! Yeast loves sugar. You be come a puffy loaf of bread.
  3. The thyroid!!! The candida likes to grow when the body is not operating at 98.6. When the body is low, like 97.5, the body can’t cook off the pathogens and keep them in check.
________________________________________
In my search for answers I found this:
This chiropractor resolved her candida with this treatment:
  • 1 drop clove essential oil mixed with olive or coconut oil in a capsule in the am and pm (so twice a day)  
  • Increase to a maximum dose of 6 drops of clove in oil per capsule twice a day
  • Use for 14 days then take a break for a week or two
  • It might take a few cycles to resolve
  • She noticed a “yeast dump” on day 8 of the first cycle
  • Clove oil is supposedly 75% more effective than Nystatin
  • Make sure you use reputable sources for all ingredients
Please work with your medical practitioner on all treatment suggestions.

For more:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/08/02/can-these-essential-oils-help-lyme-patients-overcome-chronic-candida/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/07/16/understanding-candida-overgrowth-natural-solutions-for-yeast-infection/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/07/05/candid-signs-you-have-it-what-to-do-the-candida-summit-online-free-july-9-15-2018/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2014/10/17/candida-the-chameleon/

 

 

The Cocktail Effect

The following article is a reminder that we must be ever diligent about what we put into and onto our bodies and I would add into our minds.  It’s also a reminder that we need to consider everything we are taking and understand the possible synergistic effects of those substances.  It’s common for patients to not be completely honest with their medical professionals about everything they are taking.  They will be open about all the pharmaceutical agents but they often are reticent to mention the so-called “natural” substances as they fear the potential negative reactions; however, this is a mistake from numerous standpoints – 1) trained professionals can only truly help if they know everything the patient is taking 2) “natural” substances have effects as well 3) the combination or synergy of everything we are taking might interact into what Dr. Brogan calls “The Cocktail Effect.”

Be honest with yourself and your practitioners.

Also, remember that people have vested interests and it’s often about sales not you.  Only you truly care about you.  Take the time to learn.  Ask your pharmacist questions.  Learn.  Never quit learning.  It won’t be wasted.

And lastly, if you’ve read anything I’ve ever written, it’s become clear that scientists and researchers have vested interests as well.  And these interests do not concern primarily you.  Their heads have been turned by the bombshells in the corner:  money & power.

https://kellybroganmd.com/the-cocktail-effect/?

The Cocktail Effect

Be skeptical.

Be very skeptical when you are delivered platitudes of reassurance about the safety of chemicals and pharmaceutical products from those who stand to profit from their sales. It can take more than a decade for signals of harm to trickle into consciousness.  We have an even more complex problem at play here: scientists are not doing the right types of studies.

I specialized, in residency and fellowship, in the “safety” of psychiatric medications during pregnancy and breastfeeding. After memorizing every study on the subject, I furrowed my brow and said, “Hold on a minute…these studies aren’t asking the right questions!” They ask – are babies born on time, are they big or small, and are they born with ten fingers and ten toes.

In today’s modern day toxic soup, these questions miss the mark of establishing the risk of chronic disease and neurodevelopmental delay and dysfunction. These studies tend not to control for important variables of biochemical individuality such as inflammatory markers, the gut microbiome, and obesity. And they definitely don’t ask questions about synergy.

What’s Synergy?

It’s the dynamic effects of toxicants in combination. It’s the new toxicology. One that acknowledges that even low doses of chemicals, particularly when combined, can sabotage cellular processes. It also acknowledges the role of hormones in this reaction, from cortisol to estrogen.

A powerful new study published in Nature Communications meets the science head on, exploring the Cocktail Effect. It looks at the effect of a synthetic estrogen in the birth control pill  on the toxicity of a pesticide. The endocrine disrupting potential of the more than 150,000 chemicals in our environment may have the capacity to disrupt our metabolism when combined with pharmaceutical exposures as common as oral contraceptives.

Delfosse et al are the first to identify how this can happen by showing that independent chemical molecules can help each other plug into the same hormonal receptor and activate it in a supercharged way. The amazing fact is that these chemicals have this hormonal effect at doses at which they are inactive when separate. In their non-user-friendly jargon, they state:

Our results suggest that the formation of ‘supramolecular ligands’ within the ligand-binding pocket of nuclear receptors contributes to the synergistic toxic effect of chemical mixtures, which may have broad implications for the fields of endocrine disruption, toxicology and chemical risk assessment.

What this means is that one chemical/toxicant can make you more vulnerable to another, as we have seen with glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, and that multiple chemicals can wreak more havoc than individual chemicals alone.

Here’s one more reason to ditch birth control, go organic, and clean up your products!

_________________

**Comment**

Great, great reminder.  If you haven’t begun this life “clean up” process, take a deep breath and realize it took you decades to develop your habits.  It’s going to take some time to change them.  Please, don’t beat up on yourself now, just start.  Take one thing and then when you are able, take another thing.

I remember feeling so overwhelmed when I first found out both my husband and I were infected with numerous tick borne illnesses.  I knew we were at the precipice of something monumental and my mind went crazy with the implications – from how we were going to pay the monumental out-of-pocket medical bills, to the implications of homeschooling 3 teenagers (something we were already doing but now were ill & broke to boot), to the timing of the plethora of medications, to considering dietary, and other changes that needed to be made.  It seriously made me want to scream in frustration as I was having trouble remembering why I walked into a room!  The insomnia was maddening and I couldn’t handle stress at all.  The pain sent me to the fetal position in bed, and trying to unravel my husband’s hallucinations made me feel as if I stepped into a Sci-Fy novel of the worst kind – the kind where reality and fantasy are inseparable.

So just begin by putting one foot in front of the other.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Can These Essential Oils Help Lyme Patients Overcome Chronic Candida?

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/can-essential-oils-help-lyme-disease-patients-overcome-greg-lee/

Can These Essential Oils Help Lyme Disease Patients Overcome Chronic Candida Infections?

By Greg Lee Published on

FREE-Sample-of-Essential-Oils

photo credit:  freebiesdip.com

For people diagnosed with Lyme disease that have persistent Candida infections

Have you ever been frustrated by a really slow computer? A month ago, I was making a video and it took f-o-r-e-v-e-r to edit the final version. The computer was being choked by a group of programs called “Bloatware.” These programs ate up huge amounts of disk space and processing which turned my computer into a slow moving tortoise.

How is Bloatware that slows down your computer similar to recurring Candida infections in people also diagnosed with Lyme disease?

Just like Bloatware, Candida can slow you down by eating up your valuable energy and increasing inflammation

According to the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Candida lives on the skin and in the digestive tract without normally causing symptoms. Candida can cause local infections in the mouth, throat, esophagus and in the vagina. Candida can also cause systemic infections which affect the blood, heart, brain, eyes, bones, and other parts of the body1. Symptoms found in persistent Candida infections can include leaky gut, irritable bowel syndrome2, chronic fatigue3, arthritis4, clinical depression5, cerebral abscesses6, neck stiffness, seizures7, fever, chills, weakness, and death8. An immune system weakened by Lyme disease may make people more vulnerable to Candida infections.

Lyme disease patients may be more susceptible to recurring Candida infections 

A Lyme disease infection may weaken the immune system and make people more susceptible to opportunistic Candida infections9. Also, many Lyme patients receive prolonged antibiotic therapy which can kill off healthy gut microbes and can lead to irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), leaky gut and Candida overgrowth10. Another theory for chronic Candida in Lyme patients is an inability to produce the necessary inflammatory compounds for eliminating yeast infections.

Chronic Candida infection patients may not be able to produce important anti-fungal inflammatory compounds

In a UK study on chronic Candida infection patients, Interleukin-2 (IL-2), Interleukin-12 (IL-12) production was significantly lower and Interleukin-6 (IL-6) production was much higher11. The study indicates that Candida patients over produce IL-6 which can lead to decreased IL-12. Lower IL-12 is correlated with the inability to clear fungal infections. Patients with gastrointestinal Candida have higher levels of Interleukin-17 (IL-17) which promotes fungal colonization12. Not only Candida, but also Lyme infections can lead to excess inflammation production.

Excess inflammatory compounds may also prevent clearing of Lyme as well as Candida

Increased IL-6 leading to decreased levels of IL-12 may enable Lyme and Candida infections to persist. In neurological Lyme patients, higher levels of inflammatory compounds including IL-6, IL-2, Interleukin-5 (IL-5), Interleukin-10 (IL-10), and CXCL13 were found in spinal fluid13. In a Borrelia infected mice study, decreased IL-12 lead to decreased arthritis and increased levels of Lyme disease in tissues14. In another study, increased IL-17 led to the development of destructive arthritis in mice infected with Borrelia15. Drug resistant strains of Candida may also lead to persistent yeast infections in Lyme patients.

Candida can persist despite multiple anti-fungal medications

In the US and Canada, multi-drug resistant strains of Candida have been found in immune compromised patients16. Candida can also produce a protective slime called a “biofilm” which may make infections up to 1000x more drug resistant17. As a result of resistant and biofilm forms of Candida, Lyme patients undergoing antibiotic therapy may experience recurring Candida infections.

Are there natural remedies that can help to reduce recurring symptoms by targeting antibiotic resistant and biofilm forms of Candida?

Fortunately, there are five essential oils that have been effective against drug resistant and biofilm forms of Candida

In a multiple studies, essential oils were effective at inhibiting drug resistant forms of Candida than anti-fungal medications. Other essential oils were highly effective at reducing Candida biofilms. Many of these essential oils have been used safely for years in our food supply18 and to help patients with Candida and Lyme disease to reduce relapsing symptoms. Microparticle “liposome” essential oils have greater penetration into organs and tissues in animal and lab studies19.

Anti-Drug Resistant Candida Essential Oil #1: Clove Bud

Clove bud essential oil demonstrated considerable anti-fungal properties against Fluconazole-resistant strains of Candida in one lab study20. In another study, clove bud exhibited anti-biofilm activity against Candida species biofilms21. In another lab study, clove bud inhibited IL-6, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), and IL-1022.

Clove bud essential oil eradicated all Lyme disease persister cells and dissolved biofilms in a lab study23. In multiple animal and lab studies, clove bud oil has also been effective against biofilms produced by Staphylococcus aureus24, E. Coli25, and Aeromonas hydrophila26. In multiple lab studies, clove oil inhibits Salmonella typhimurium, E. coli, B. cereus, Listeria innocua, Morganella morganii, Listeria monocytogenes, Enterobacteriaceae, S. aureus, and Pseudomonas species27. This oil also posses potent anti-fungal properties against Aspergillus flavus28.

Clove bud oil use is cautioned in pregnancy. This oil has anti-coagulant properties and is cautioned with the use of diabetic medications, anticoagulant medications, after major surgery, peptic ulcer, hemophilia, and other bleeding disorders. It may interact with pethidine, MAOIs or SSRIs. It is also cautioned against using this oil on diseased or damaged, or hypersensitive skin, and with children under 2 years old This oil has US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) generally recognized as safe (GRAS) status29. Similar to clove bud oil, tea tree has excellent anti-Candida properties.

Anti-Drug Resistant Candida Essential Oil #2: Tea Tree

In lab studies, tea tree oil inhibited drug resistant Candida strains30 and was effective at inhibiting biofilm growth31. Tea tree oil was also effective against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae32, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and its biofilm,33 Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus34, Aspergillus fumigatus, Penicillium chrysogenum35, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mycoplasma fermentans36, group A streptococcus37, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium culmorum, Pyrenophora graminea38, Alternaria alternata, Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium oxysporum39 in lab and animal studies.

In an endotoxin lab study, tea tree essential oil was effective at lowering inflammatory compounds IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-1040. In another lab study, tea tree oil decreased IL-2 and increased anti-inflammatory compound IL-441. Caution: some cases have been reported where tea tree oil caused allergic dermatitis when placed on the skin42. In five cases, high doses of this oil internally, 0.5-1.0 ml/kg, have produced central nervous system symptoms of loss of coordination, drowsiness, unconsciousness, diarrhea, and abdominal pain43. Just like tea tree, geranium essential oil has multiple anti-Candida properties.

Anti-Drug Resistant Candida Essential Oil #3: Geranium

In multiple lab studies, geranium oil inhibited Fluconazole resistant Candida strains44 and inhibited multiple Candida species biofilms45. Geranium oil was also effective at significantly decreasing inflammatory compounds IL-6, IL-10, IL-2 and COX-2 levels when exposed to Candida proteins in another lab study46. In a mouse study, this oil inhibited the degranulation of mast cells47.

The use of geranium oil is cautioned with diabetes medications, drugs metabolized by CYP2B6, and has a low risk of skin sensitization48. Just like geranium, savory reduced resistant forms of Candida.

Anti-Drug Resistant Candida Essential Oil #4: Savory

Due to their compositional similarity, winter and summer savory essential oils are grouped together here. In one lab study, winter savory essential oil was highly effective at inhibiting drug resistant strains of Candida glabrata49. In another lab study, summer savory essential oil demonstrated substantial anti-fungal activity against Candida albicans and it’s biofilms50.

Since these oils may inhibit blood clotting; use is cautioned with anticoagulant medications, major surgery, peptic ulcer, hemophilia, other bleeding disorders. Use is also cautioned with diabetic medications, use on mucous membranes due to a moderate risk of irritation and use on hypersensitive, diseased or damaged skin due to a low risk of skin irritation. Use is also cautioned in children under 2 years of age51. Similar to savory, lemon has demonstrated anti-Candida properties.

Anti-Drug Resistant Candida Essential Oil #5: Lemon

In lab studies, lemon essential oil was effective at inhibiting drug-resistant Candida species52. This oil was also 100% effective at reducing a mixed species Candida albicans and E. Coli biofilm53. If applied to the skin, skin must not be exposed to sunlight or sunbed rays for 12 hours54. These essential oils in combination may help to reduce relapsing symptoms caused by drug resistant and biofilm forms of Candida in patients with Lyme disease.

Essential oils may help to reduce recurring symptoms caused by antifungal resistant and biofilm forms of Candida

Similar to deleting the Bloatware off your computer to speed it up, a powerful combination of essential oils may help you to overcome energy draining and relapsing symptoms caused by drug resistant and biofilm forms of Candida. Formulating these remedies into microparticle liposomes may enhance the stability and extend the anti-fungal activity of these essential oils. Since these essential oils have cautions and contraindications on their use, work with a Lyme literate essential oil practitioner to develop a proper, safe, and effective strategy for your condition.

– Greg

 

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/01/03/the-invisible-universe-of-the-human-microbiome-msm/

“Recitas, author of ‘The Plan,’ calls MSM the wonder supplement for your gut. It can alleviate allergy symptoms, helps with detoxification, eliminates free radicals, and improves cell permeability. She states that with given time, MSM will start to actually repair damage caused by leaky gut – a common problem with Lyme/MSIDS patients. It can also help the body’s ability to absorb nutrients from food. Many Lyme patients struggle with paralysis of the gut where the muscles of the stomach and intestines stop being efficient. MSM helps this muscle tone as well.”

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/05/15/overview-of-anti-inflammatory-diets/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/05/20/minding-your-mitochondria/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/04/18/comparative-diets-to-address-chronic-inflammation/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FREE Online IBS & SIBO Summit – Sept. 3-10, 2018

https://ibsandsibosossummit.com/?  (Register here and watch short video)

The IBS & SIBO SOS™ Summit is online and FREE from September 3-10, 2018!

Left untreated, these pervasive digestion issues can have devastating effects on your quality of life — but there ARE solutions and our world-renowned experts are here to share them! Anyone who suffers from IBS, SIBO, leaky gut or related digestive disorders will benefit greatly from their cutting-edge research and education — information that’s available here first!

Join us at The IBS & SIBO SOS™ Summit to learn more about:

  • Identifying the root cause of your digestive struggles
  • Saving money from wasted doctor visits and ineffective treatments
  • Identifying which foods cause your flares
  • Naturopathic and conventional principles important to gut healing
  • Strategies for food reintroduction
  • Treatments, protocols and diets for IBS and/or SIBO
  • And more!

The IBS & SIBO SOS™ Summit is hosted by health advocate and popular TV personality Shivan Sarna. Shivan asks the questions YOU would ask if you were in the room with these experts. She draws on her own experience with painful digestive issues and years of failed treatments (alternative and conventional) to be YOUR champion for improved health &mdashl and she’s here to share her knowledge with you!

Meet Your Host

Shivan Sarna

Shivan Sarna

Shivan Sarna has played many roles in her life: daughter, wife, friend, yoga instructor, successful TV host. Now, she’s a passionate SIBO / IBS health educator and advocate. In 2015, Shivan was diagnosed with SIBO (Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth) after a lifetime of struggling with digestive issues. She decided to turn her past pain and victory over SIBO into a tangible way to help others suffering with similar health challenges. Shivan made her vision a reality when SIBO SOS™ was born — a movement for awareness, advocacy and patient empowerment.