Archive for the ‘Malaria’ Category

The Kite Mosquito Patch

Approximately 2 min.

http://www.kitepatch.com/kite-patch

Dr. Anandasankar Ray and his team from the University of California, Riverside, has developed the Kite Patch, a small patch worn on clothing to protect against mosquitos.  The patch blocks the mosquitoes’ ability to track and detect humans for up to 48 hours.  It should be for sale in 2017.  http://magazine.ucr.edu/44

All Kite products are free from DEET or any other potentially harmful or toxic chemicals.  The company is committed to replacing outdated and potentially unhealthy repellents that have dominated the market for decades.

The patch could help protect against malaria, West Nile, Dengue fever, and other mosquito-borne diseases.

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v474/n7349/full/nature10081.html  Journal article.

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2015/08/11/high-tech-hope-for-repelling-mosquitoes/?_r=0  One person’s review.

 

Babesia Cure?

http://news.yale.edu/2016/06/06/combination-therapy-cures-tick-borne-illness-mice

Yale researchers have found that combining atovaquone and ELQ-334, at low doses, cleared Babesia in mice and prevented recurrence up to 122 days.

ELQ stands for Endochin like quinolone and is a preclinical candidate that targets the liver and blood stages of malarial organisms.

http://malariajournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1475-2875-13-339  It’s been known since 1948 that Endochin has anti-malarial properties; however, it has proven to be ineffective in vivo against human malaria.  Recent advances have suggested revisiting previously abandoned lead molecules to be possible viable anti-malarial drug candidates.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23019377  ELQ-271 and ELQ-316 are effective against acute and latent toxoplasmosis.

When I asked my pharmacist about the ELQ’s, he said he couldn’t find anything about the manufacturing process, and that as far as side effects, there won’t be a much information available until ELQ-334 proceeds further in the approval process. Sometimes side effects don’t show up until well after drugs have been on the market.  He also stated that there were only 800 cases of neuropathy from 1998-2013 reported to the FDA for quinolines.  

While I could be wrong, Endochin like quinolone could possibly mean it is made with fluoride.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/07/18/antibiotics-to-avoid–the-plague-due-to-fdas-oversight-failure.aspx  Quinolones are made with fluoride, which enables them to penetrate into tissue, including your brain.  This ability is what makes them valuable against tick borne infections.

Omniflox, Raxar, Trovan, Zagam, and Tequin have all been banned due to their side effects; however, Cipro, Levaquin, Avelox, and Floxin continue to be prescribed.

In Dr. Cohen’s 2001 study, the following side effects were documented:

*Nervous system symptoms occurred in 91 percent of patients (pain, tingling and numbness, dizziness, malaise, weakness, headaches, anxiety and panic, loss of memory, psychosis)
*Musculoskeletal symptoms in 73 percent of patients (tendon ruptures, tendonitis, weakness, joint swelling)
*Sensory symptoms in 42 percent of patients (tinnitus, altered visual, olfactory, and auditory function)
*Cardiovascular symptoms in 36 percent of patients (tachycardia, shortness of breath, chest pain, palpitations)
*Skin reactions in 29 percent of patients (rashes, hair loss, sweating, intolerance to heat or cold)
*Gastrointestinal symptoms in 18 percent of patients (nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain)
A comprehensive list of reactions can be found at Dr. Cohen’s site Medication Sense.

According to Dr. Mercola, quinolones are too often prescribed for minor problems such as sinus, bladder, and prostate infections. He feels these super-antibiotics should be used as a last line of defense.

 

Be armed with facts to make an informed decision about these antibiotics with your LLMD (Lyme literate doctor).  One of the most experienced LLMD’s in Wisconsin states that he has used quinolones for over 20 years without tendon rupture.  It’s important to notify your doctor immediately if you notice symptoms such as tendon pain or anything else that doesn’t seem right.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toxoplasmosis

Toxoplasma-gondii-660x380

Toxoplasma gondii,

by AJ Cann http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com/2013/04/26/mind-bending-parasite-permanently-quells-cat-fear-in-mice/

http://www.cdc.gov/parasites/toxoplasmosis/epi.html Toxoplasmosis is caused by a common protozoan parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, and is the leading cause of death attributed to food borne illness in the U.S. More than 60 million carry it but are asymptomatic. It is also on the of the CDC’s “Neglected Parasitic Infections,” and has been targeted for public health action.

Transmission:  food (undercooked contaminated meat, or knives, utensils, cutting boards, or other foods that had contact with contaminated meat), congenitally (mother to infant), and in blood transfusions, and organ transplants. Sexual transmission is theorized.  However, cats, the only known hosts, play an important role, by eating infected rodents, birds, or other small animals and shedding oocysts in their feces up to 3 weeks after infection. An infected cat contaminates the litter box and/or the soil or water if it goes outside. Transmission to humans occurs after accidental ingestion. In the human host, the parasites form tissue cysts in skeletal muscle, myocardium, brain, and eyes, and may remain for the life of the host, and can reactivate when the immune system is compromised.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16457490  There is evidence of coinfection of Toxoplasmosis with Lyme Disease. This particular patient was initially diagnosed with MS and had symptoms of clumsiness and weakness of the right extremities, and years later was also diagnosed with LD (borrelia). Toxoplasmosis is significant in people who are immuno-suppressed, and Lyme Disease will trigger a previous asymptomatic case.

http://chronic-lyme-disease-solutions.com/Toxoplasmosis.html  http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/toxoplasmosis/basics/symptoms/con-20025859

Symptoms: body aches, swollen lymph nodes, fatigue, headache, confusion, seizures, coordination problems, fever, lung problems, blurred vision, encephalitis, mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder. It has been linked with anti-social, aggressive, and jealous behavior in men, and promiscuity in women. Children born with it may develop hearing loss, mental disability, blindness, and even death.

http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2012/03/how-your-cat-is-making-you-crazy/308873/  Stanford’s Robert Sapolsky and British groups say that Toxoplasmosis in lab rats changes the wiring in their brains which can take away their fear response, drawing them to their number one predator — cats. Years ago Czech scientist, Jarosav Flegr, noticed reckless traits in his own behavior which included crossing the street in the middle of dense traffic and openly scorning the Communists who ruled his native Czechoslovakia. He accidentally discovered he had the parasite when he was asked to donate blood to test a diagnostic kit for Toxo. He discovered that the French have infection rates as high as 55%, due to their desire for steak prepared saignant, which literally means, “bleeding,” while Americans have a 10-20% infection rate. Neurobiologist Ajai Vyas found Toxo cysts in rat testicles and semen and that the protozoan then moves into the female womb, typically infecting 60% of pups, then heads to her brain to affect her behaviors eventually getting back to the cat. This leads to the possibility of sexual transmission in humans. The research also found that 75% of the females preferred the infected males. Psychiatrist E. Fuller Torry points out that schizophrenia rose in prevalence in the latter half of the 18th century just when people in London and Paris started keeping cats as pets. He believes that 75% of schizophrenia is associated with infections, with Toxo a significant portion.

Once a human becomes infected the parasite needs to get back into the cat, the only place where it sexually reproduces. Due to the impoverished Soviet economy, Flegr gave personality tests and computer-based tests to assess reaction times to infected and non infected Czech students. His findings were so strange he tested then civilian and military populations. He found: infected men wore rumpled old clothes, had fewer friends, and were more hesitant, while infected women wore expensive, designer brands, had more friends, and were extremely trusting – doing what they were told. Both had slower reaction times, less attentiveness, an abnormal fear response, and were two and a half more times more likely to be in traffic accidents. Two Turkish studies have replicated the traffic accident finding. He also also found that 12 of 44 schizophrenia patients had reduced gray matter, with the decrease occurring almost exclusively in those who tested positive for Toxoplasmosis.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/295012.php?trendmd-shared=0  Medical News Today reported on a study claiming the parasite is responsible for around a fifth of schizophrenia cases. Now, new research by Johns Hopkins provides further evidence of this association after reviewing two previous studies which identified a link between cat ownership in childhood and development of schizophrenia and other mental disorders later in life and then  comparing them with the results of a 1982 National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) questionnaire.  The questionnaire revealed that around 50% of individuals who had a cat as a family pet during childhood were diagnosed with schizophrenia or other mental illnesses later in life, compared with 42% who did not have a cat during childhood. 

T. gondii may be the culprit. 

Researchers at the Academic Medical Centre in Amsterdam, the Netherlands conducted a meta-analysis of more than 50 studies that established a link between T. gondii and increased risk of schizophrenia.

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/247346.php   Women carrying IgG antibodies to Toxo when giving birth have a higher risk of self-harm or suicide later on, especially if antibody levels are high.

Diagnosis:  http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/toxoplasmosis/basics/tests-diagnosis/con-20025859 Serology to check for antibodies to the parasite, although tissue cysts may be observed through stained biopsy. The CDC recommends all positive results be confirmed by a specialty lab for Toxoplasmosis. In some cases if testing is done too soon, there will be a false negative, and it would be wise to consider retesting later to give the body a chance to produce antibodies. A positive means you are actively infected or that you are asymptomatic. Congenital cases are found using molecular methods such as PCR or with an ultrasound scan that reveals hydrocephalus (fluid in the brain). A negative ultrasound does NOT rule out infection.

Please see your health practitioner for Treatment

Treatment: Healthy people keep the organism in check and do not require treatment; however, if you are also fighting MSIDS, you should consider this organism in your treatment picture.
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseasesconditions/toxoplasmosis/basics/treatment/con-20025859
Pyrimethamine (Daraprim), a malarial drug is the typical drug of choice, which may prevent your ability to absorb the B vitamin, folate, necessitating supplementation. In conjunction, Sulfadiazine is used, with Clindamycin (Cleocin) as an alternative. Those with HIV/AIDS may need to take these medications for life or until the CD4 remains high for 3-6 months. Spiramycin, an experimental drug in the U.S., is used in Europe to reduce a baby’s risk of neurological problems and may be obtained from the FDA.

Similarly to borrelia, the causative agent of Lyme Disease, once the parasite is in brain cells; however, antibiotics cannot kill off the thick-walled cysts.

Prevention: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/toxoplasmosis/basics/prevention/con-20025859

*Wear gloves when you garden or handle soil and wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water afterward.
*Don’t eat raw or undercooked meat.
*Wash kitchen utensils thoroughly. After preparing raw meat, wash cutting boards, knives and other utensils in hot, soapy water to prevent cross contamination of other foods. Wash your hands after handling raw meat.
*Wash all fruits and vegetables. Scrub fresh fruits and vegetables, especially if you plan to eat them raw. Remove peels when possible, but only after washing.
*Don’t drink unpasteurized milk. Unpasteurized milk and other dairy products may contain toxoplasma parasites.
*Cover children’s sandboxes. If you have a sandbox, cover it when your children aren’t playing in it to keep cats from using it as a litter box.

If you’re pregnant or otherwise at risk of toxoplasmosis or its complications, take these steps to protect yourself:
*Help your cat stay healthy. Keep your cat indoors and feed it dry or canned cat food, not raw meat. Cats can become infected after eating infected prey or undercooked meat that contains the parasite.
*Avoid stray cats or kittens. Although all stray animals need good homes, it’s best to let someone else adopt them. Most cats don’t show signs of T. gondii infection, and although they can be tested for toxoplasmosis, it may take up to a month to get the results.
*Have someone else clean your cat’s litter box. If that’s not possible, wear gloves and a face mask to change the litter. Then wash your hands well. Change the litter daily so that excreted cysts don’t have time to become infectious.

Hyperthermia and MSIDS

Sitting in my doctor’s office, I read an article that intrigued me but made me shudder simultaneously.  In the November 8, 2013 issue of Science pp. 684-687, I read of Plasmodium vivax, the long considered “benign” malaria parasite which threatens billions of people, but more interestingly to me as an MSIDS patient, was it’s historical usage as a cure for tertiary syphilis.  Physicians in the late 19th century believed that high fever could help cure many mental illnesses.  These poor patients were institutionalized with a dismally gruesome future of increasingly neurotic behavior and paralyzation.  They had no hope.

Austrian psychiatrist Julius Wagner-Jauregg initially used tuberculin and salmonella toxins but his fever experiments failed.  He reasoned this was due to too low of a fever, so in 1917 when a soldier fighting in the Balkans was admitted to his ward with Malaria, he tried again using his blood to inoculate nine neurosyphilis patients.  Six recovered.

Thus started the wave of malariotherapy which became the treatment for tertiary syphilis.  No one is sure how it worked but the resulting high fevers appeared to help the patients’ immune systems.  About half resumed to normal activities; many resumed independent lives.

According to Kevin Baird of the Eiikman Oxford Clinical Research Unit in Jakarta, this medicinal use of P. vivax is in part to blame for the neglect of the disease it causes as people assumed it must be harmless even though it killed as many as 15% of patients who had the treatment.

This background paves the way for what is to follow:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLYZcju9RGM&sns=em

The above youtube is not only an excellent expose on MSIDS in Australia, but also on the current usage of hyperthermia.   Australian patients, who appear to have MSIDS are ignored and told it’s all in their heads.  The video shows patients getting worse, having to quit work, and breaking down in front of the camera.

Same story, different country.  

Kudos to Dr. Schloeffel who is one Australian doctor who refuses to accept patient abuse and neglect and treats his patients clinically not basing all of his decisions on faulty testing.

Due to the lack of acceptance and treatment, many Australian MSIDS patients are heading to Germany to receive the old fashioned hyperthermia treatment at St. George Clinic.  Dr. Frederich Douwes, stumbled upon Hyperthermia as a possible cure for MSIDS while treating cancer patients.  Again, hyperthermia gives the body an artificial fever.  For over 6 hours a patient’s body is heated to 41.7 degrees.

Dauwes says he has treated over 18,000 whole body hyperthermia patients with no negative side-effects.  Other modalities for MSIDS patients are included as well such as ozone, Reiki, acupuncture, foot spa detox, magnetic and laser therapy and IV antibiotics.  It costs anywhere from $30,000 – $55,000 for treatment.

The video is approximately 23 minutes long and worth every minute of it.  Very well done.  Although published in 2014, nothing much has changed in regards to general physician knowledge either in Australia or the United States.

Lastly, this raises a question:  supposedly “between 1917 and the rise of penicillin in the 1940’s, tens of thousands of syphilis patients were infected with malaria.” p. 686.  We know for sure syphilis is spread through sexual contact.  They not only had syphilis but malaria.  What happened to those people and their off-spring?  Is there a connection between the malaria experiment on syphilis patients and MSIDS today?

And hyperthermia?  I’m just thankful they aren’t using Malaria!