Archive for the ‘Psychological Aspects’ Category

Lyme is ‘All in Your Head’ – A Wake-up Call to Mental Health Professionals

https://www.madinamerica.com/2017/03/lyme-wake-up-call/

Lyme is ‘All in Your Head’ – A Wake-up Call to Mental Health Professionals

Every day, in doctors’ offices across the US—as well as in Canada, the UK, Ireland, Amsterdam, Australia, Sweden, in 80 countries and on every continent—chronic Lyme disease sufferers are being told that their debilitating, destructive, multi-systemic illness is nothing more than a small nuisance condition that is really just ‘all in their head’.

For more than forty years, mainstream medicine has kept chronic Lyme disease in the shadows. The disease itself, as well as the political machinations of this disease, plunges sufferers down a complicated, confusing, and terrifying abyss—a black hole of personal anguish, conflicting medical views, widespread corruption, and unrelenting health care navigation.

Today, chronic Lyme disease has reached pandemic proportions, with a grossly underreported 300,000 cases in the US alone, and millions suffering worldwide. This is a critical time for mental health professionals to step up for the sake of millions who are chronically ill, infirm and medically abandoned.

As mainstream medicine continues to turn its back, invalidating, denying, ignoring and even mocking the sufferers of this very real chronic illness, the mental health profession has a moral and ethical obligation to create a system of care for those who are sick and dying, who are without medical support and are left to struggle entirely on their own. What we desperately need is a wake-up call to psychiatrists and all mental health care providers, asking you to become educated about this infectious disease and be aware that it must be used as a differential diagnosis.

How have I come to know this Lyme world so intimately?

For more than four years now I have been immersed in the land of chronic Lyme, driven by my adult son’s illness. I am a Registered Psychotherapist in private practice in Toronto, Canada where I support chronic Lyme sufferers firsthand. And I am the author of the newly released book Lyme Madness: Rescuing My Son Down the Rabbit Hole of Chronic Lyme Disease.

We entered ‘Lymeland’ in October of 2012, when we were forced to go on a long, terrifying and overwhelming medical odyssey starting with a grueling 18-month journey into the offices of 20 medical specialists in NYC, each of whom missed my son’s diagnosis altogether. This hero’s journey required us to navigate my son’s declining health issues entirely on our own. We were forced to do our own research and use our intuition, determine the diagnosis for ourselves, and then traverse the slippery slope of this foreign land—an upside down, inside out, mad world where most doctors are not there to support you save for a handful of ‘believers’. On this expedition, just like all Lyme sufferers and caregivers, we were forced to become our own microbiologist, neurologist, immunologist, gastroenterologist, infectious disease specialist and so on, in order to map out a treatment plan, all without a GPS.

Our story is by no means unique. Most chronic Lyme sufferers are ill for months, years or even decades before they come to understand the root cause of their dis-ease. Most sufferers consult with a multitude of doctors only to have to figure it out for themselves.

So this has now become part two of my mission: to educate my colleagues about the devastating neuropsychiatric, bio/psycho/social, and physical effects of this illness.

When patients present with intractable depression, intractable anxiety, and a myriad of other symptoms, mental health professionals must consider that infectious disease can potentially be a root cause. It’s not enough to only consider childhood trauma when assessing mental health. And it’s no longer acceptable or appropriate to make a bee line to the prescription pad as the first line of defense. First, the potential underlying mechanisms of neurological inflammation, immunosuppression, and infectious disease need to be more widely considered.

Chronic Lyme disease is a neurological, bacteria driven, multisystem, immunosuppressive, post sepsis illness. And it’s a disease that for more than forty years has been kept in the shadows by mainstream medicine, forcing sufferers to go it alone and navigate this life-altering illness without adequate support. Many are losing their health, their livelihoods, their relationships, their homes, and their dignity.

Yes, it’s true. Chronic Lyme disease is, in fact, in your head. But not in the way that doctors intend that to mean. Contrary to medical consensus, chronic Lyme disease is not a made-up illness. It is NOT a case of malingering, Munchausen, hypochondria, laziness, or “craziness.”

Chronic Lyme disease is all in your head because it is primarily a neurological disease, wreaking havoc on your brain and your nervous system—as well as your heart, your liver, your kidneys, and so many other organs. Lyme disease patients can, and most often do, experience anxiety, depression, panic attacks, rage, attention problems, short-term memory loss, personality changes, mood swings, and learning disabilities.

Chronic Lyme sufferers can also experience detachment, dissociation, depersonalization, psychotic episodes, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. As with any cognitive impairment, chronic Lyme sufferers may have trouble keeping track of their daily tasks, they may lose things easily, including words and objects, they may have trouble retrieving information, forget appointments, and struggle with holding a conversation.

Sufferers are desperate for mental health professionals (along with all other medical specialists) to understand Lyme so that they will know to consider it as a potential differential diagnosis before plying a patient with psychotropic meds that may make matters worse. There have been so many Lyme sufferers misdiagnosed as bipolar or schizophrenic and then institutionalized when, in actual fact, the patient who has been committed to a psych ward is suffering from Lyme encephalitis.

Suicidal ideation and completed suicides are not uncommon among Lyme sufferers. I understand why this is the case, having personally witnessed the intolerable suffering of those who have wanted to end their lives. I have also read plenty of stories about those who have taken their own lives as a result of Lyme—stories that are heartbreaking and tragic, and perhaps could have been prevented.

There are a number of reasons why people commit suicide. And chronic Lyme is the perfect storm. It’s a disease that matches up with so many reasons for not being able to see a way out of the darkness. It is clear to me how and why chronic Lyme sufferers, in particular, so often succumb to this disease by their own hand.

Anxiety and depression are commonly experienced neurological symptoms of Lyme. After all, with Lyme, the brain is inflamed and therefore subject to all sorts of neurological imbalances. This, compounded by the lack of (and often outright negation of) medical attention, can lead to discouragement, fear, helplessness, frustration, loss, grief, loneliness, and, at times, little hope for recovery. When an illness is chronic and there is unrelenting suffering and inadequate relief from the myriad of debilitating symptoms, anxiety and depression can become even more pronounced.

Lyme depression is often intractable—that is, resistant to treatment. Lyme can also affect the endocrine system, potentially creating mood disorders. The collection of symptoms—including brain fog, headaches, fevers, joint pain, nerve pain, shakiness, instability, dizziness, vision and auditory disturbances, hallucinations, seizures, paralysis, and more—experienced day in and day out, can wear you down, making even the most resilient warriors eventually want out.

Lyme sufferers are socially isolated, medically denied, crying out for help, and no one is listening. Family and friends don’t know how to help. Some loved ones all but abandon the Lyme sufferer because they get fed up with the constant complaining and limitations. As doctors are showing Lyme sufferers the door, it becomes more and more difficult for loved ones to understand and support those with Lyme. Lyme sufferers feel like a burden. They can lose their independence, their livelihoods, and their ability to function. They feel like they’re losing their minds at times. They live with constant brain fog and cognitive limitations, making every task far more difficult. They get worn down by the chronic pain and illness, by the fear, the inactivity, and the inability to plan or have anything to look forward to.

Lyme sufferers have to face loss every day. Loss of health, loss of the person they once were, loss of independence, loss of dreams and goals, loss of missed opportunities, loss of the life they once had, loss of an identity, loss of self-esteem, loss of loved ones who abandon them, loss of hope, loss of finances, loss of employment, and loss of a future. Lyme sufferers are victimized many times over—by the disease itself, by doctors who turn their backs, by family and friends who roll their eyes and walk away, by insurers who refuse coverage, and by a medical system that negates the very existence of this disease.

I would give anything to un-learn, un-know and un-see the ugly and devious underbelly of mainstream medicine and all of its political machinations. And I would of course give anything to see my son fully recover from this life-altering illness. We continue to work at it every single day.

Please know that chronic Lyme disease is about so much more than ticks and bulls-eye rashes—which only 20% of sufferers ever get to see as proof positive of their disease. Chronic Lyme is the new B-cell AIDS. And if that’s not madness enough, it is also known as “the New Great Imitator,” mimicking more than 350 medical conditions including chronic fatigue syndrome, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Multiple Sclerosis and more. If only chronic Lyme disease were just about ticks and rashes. Those were simpler times when we thought this was the case.

If all that I’ve shared about this disease is overwhelming, confusing or frightening, you will understand why I’ve called my book LYME MADNESS. There is no other way to describe this journey that we’ve been forced to take. And as a therapist, an empath, and now a Lyme advocate, I know that it’s my calling to tell this cautionary tale—to be one of many voices out there working to wake up the world to what is happening.

Make no mistake: healing from chronic Lyme is a complex, multilayered, do-it-yourself guessing game, with a daily and sometimes hourly hyperfocus on what is causing the symptoms and how best to address them. And while my son has some very good non-mainstream doctors on board to help him heal, the constant shifts in his health require us to continue to be our own sleuths, researchers, doctors, and diagnosticians at all times.

Several years later, we are still searching and filing away new ideas as my son’s various symptoms wax and wane. Without question, this process is expensive and draining, as it requires throwing all kinds of stuff against the wall to see what may or may not stick. If the medical system would just do its job, the job that it’s supposed to do by training and by the very meaning of the Hippocratic oath, then perhaps this journey could be a little less do-it-yourself with a lot more certainty.

My hope is that the blaming and the discrediting of millions of patients worldwide ends now and that mainstream medicine starts to do its job and stops sick-shaming the sufferer with the statement that “it’s all in your head.”

As Dr. Kenneth B. Liegner, a US Lyme-Literate MD, one shining light in a small community of doctors who support and treat Lyme sufferers, says:

“In the fullness of time, the mainstream handling of chronic Lyme disease will be viewed as one of the most shameful episodes in the history of medicine because elements of academic medicine, elements of government, and virtually the entire insurance industry have colluded to deny a disease. This has resulted in needless suffering of many individuals who deteriorate and sometimes die for lack of timely application of treatment or denial of treatment beyond some arbitrary duration.”

He has also generously reminded me,

“If it were not for mothers, we would be nowhere with Lyme disease. It is MOTHERS, concerned about their families, their children, that have sparked ALL progress in this field!”

That’s because mothers know that when our kids are suffering—even our adult kids—we must trust that it is not necessarily all in their head. Mental health professionals must trust this too.
Lori Dennis, MA, RP is a Registered Psychotherapist in Private Practice in Toronto, Canada and author of the newly released book LYME MADNESS: Rescuing My Son Down the Rabbit Hole of Chronic Lyme Disease.

_________________

For more:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2015/10/18/psychiatric-lymemsids/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/12/20/diagnosing-ld-in-children-with-neuropsychiatric-illness/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/08/25/neuropsychiatric-lyme-borreliosis-an-overview-with-a-focus-on-a-specialty-psychiatrists-clinical-practice/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/06/04/ld-diagnosis-took-forever-because-of-mental-health-stigma/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/06/20/suicide-lyme-and-associated-diseases/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/07/05/suicide-poses-a-complicated-risk-in-those-with-infectious-diseases/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/10/03/treat-the-infection-psychiatric-symptoms-get-better/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/10/03/lyme-patient-misdiagnosed-with-anxiety-depression/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/08/07/understanding-and-treating-depersonalization-and-derealization/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/01/11/bug-that-hijacked-my-mind-part-1/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/07/26/can-lyme-steal-your-mind/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/01/17/lymemsids-and-psychiatric-illness/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/04/11/hidden-invaders-infections-can-trigger-immune-attacks-on-kids-brains-provoking-devastating-psychiatric-disorders/

 

 

 

 

 

UH Study Shows Hawaii Kids More Vulnerable to Bartonella

http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/2019/01/17/uh-study-cat-scratch-disease-three-times-more-prevalent-hawaii-keiki-than-mainland-kids/

Cat scratch disease: It’s rare, but a UH study says Hawaii kids are more vulnerable

Cat scratch disease: It’s rare, but a UH study says Hawaii kids are more vulnerable
UH and Kapiolani doctors are warning about cat scratch disease.

Symptoms include fever and swollen lymph nodes. UH and Kapiolani Medical Center doctors studied 18 children who got severe reactions.

“These were children who had infections of their spleen, liver, meningitis, encephalitis. involvement of their eye. Some even developed bone lesions so it was a significant illness in these children,” said Dr. Jessica Kosut, a pediatric hospitalist.

Sarah Pacheco got a mild form of the illness years ago when her new kitten, Kipling, scratched her arm.

“I had just gotten a kitten and they play and you are bound to get scratched, but I noticed I lost my voice completely,” she said.

Cat scratch disease is still rare. Doctors think Hawaii’s humid climate, outdoor lifestyle and higher feral cat population could be partly to blame.

“I don’t think it’s cats that are in people’s homes, but it can be, but a couple of the children that we took care of described playing with cats that were out in the neighborhood and one child was hiding cats in his closet to keep them a secret from his mother,” said Dr. Kosut.

Doctors say cat scratch disease is treatable. Just make sure your cat doesn’t have fleas and doesn’t play with feral cats, and you don’t have to kick out your kitty.

“I’m definitely a fan of cats and I wouldn’t say that this should discourage anyone from getting cats or adopting cats. I just want providers to be aware of it,” said Dr. Johnson.

__________________
**Comment**
Cat Scratch Disease (CSD) or Bartonella IS NOT RARE!  And while some develop fever and swollen lymph nodes, it presents in a million different ways – some purely psychological.
And cats aren’t the only things transmitting it.

http://townsendletter.com/July2015/bartonellosis0715_3.html
Mode of Transmission: Arthropod vectors including fleas and flea feces, biting flies such as sand flies and horn flies, the human body louse, mosquitoes, and ticks; through bites and scratches of reservoir hosts; and potentially from needles and syringes in the drug addicted. Needle stick transmission to veterinarians has been reported. There is documentation that cats have received it through blood transfusion. 3.2% of blood donors in Brazil were found to carry Bartonella in their blood. Bartonella DNA has been found in dust mites. Those with arthropod exposure have an increased risk, as well as those working and living with pets that have arthropod exposure. 28% of veterinarians tested positively for Bartonella compared with 0% of controls. About half of all cats may be infected with Bartonella – as high as 80% in feral cats and near 40% of domestic cats. In various studies dogs have close to a 50% rate as well. Evidence now suggests it may be transmitted congenitally from mother to child – potentially leading to birth defects.

I’m glad they mentioned:
  • infections of their spleen & liver
  • meningitis
  • encephalitis
  • involvement of the eye
  • bone lesions
Because, these are the things crossing my desk on a daily basis.
Bartonella is prolific, tenacious, and can cause severe illness, and many LLMD’s consider it a major coinfection of Lyme.
To read more about the organism and successful treatments:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/01/03/bartonella-treatment/
For more:  
  • Heart involvement –
  • Eye involvement –
  • Neurological involvement –
https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/02/04/from-cat-scratch-disease-to-bartonellosis/  A table within this article states Bart can cause hallucinations.
  • Skull & bone infections
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19303175  Besides the case report of a woman with osteomyelitis, the study states a literature review identified 51 other cases of osteomyelitis associated with cat scratch disease, 14 of those confirmed by PCR.
  • Thoracic involvement –
  • Cancer

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/01/02/bartonella-langerhans-cell-histiocytosis-cancer/

  • Chronic abdominal pain, esophageal heartburn, purpuric skin rash, mesenteric adenitis (swollen lymph nodes inside the abdomen)   

https://www.lymediseaseassociation.org/images/NewDirectory/Studies-Papers/Fried_Bartonella-2002.pdf

  • Granulomas & bony lesions

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/07/05/cat-scratch-disease-in-a-1-5-year-old-girl-case-report/

  • Rheumatological involvement –

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/05/09/rheumatological-presentation-of-bartonella-koehlerae-henselae-a-case-report-chiropractors-please-read/   Please note the joint popping with each articulation and continual joint subluxation issue.

  • Can turn off antibodies to Lyme, Babesia, Ehrlichia, Anaplasma, and even itself

http://www.townsendletter.com/July2009/ed_lyme0709.html  Dr. Shaller feels that due to this, Bartonella should be considered in ALL initial consults.

I’m going to stop at this point as I’m growing weary.  The question begs to be asked:
Does this look rare to you?

 

 

Marijuana, Mental Illness, & Violence

https://imprimis.hillsdale.edu/marijuana-mental-illness-violence/?

The following is adapted from a speech delivered on January 15, 2019, at Hillsdale College’s Allan P. Kirby, Jr. Center for Constitutional Studies and Citizenship in Washington, D.C.

By Alex Berenson
Author, Tell Your Children: The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence

Seventy miles northwest of New York City is a hospital that looks like a prison, its drab brick buildings wrapped in layers of fencing and barbed wire. This grim facility is called the Mid-Hudson Forensic Psychiatric Institute. It’s one of three places the state of New York sends the criminally mentally ill—defendants judged not guilty by reason of insanity.

Until recently, my wife Jackie —Dr. Jacqueline Berenson—was a senior psychiatrist there. Many of Mid-Hudson’s 300 patients are killers and arsonists. At least one is a cannibal. Most have been diagnosed with psychotic disorders like schizophrenia that provoked them to violence against family members or strangers.

A couple of years ago, Jackie was telling me about a patient. In passing, she said something like, Of course he’d been smoking pot his whole life.

Of course? I said.

Yes, they all smoke.

So marijuana causes schizophrenia?

I was surprised, to say the least. I tended to be a libertarian on drugs. Years before, I’d covered the pharmaceutical industry for The New York Times. I was aware of the claims about marijuana as medicine, and I’d watched the slow spread of legalized cannabis without much interest.

Jackie would have been within her rights to say, I know what I’m talking about, unlike you. Instead she offered something neutral like, I think that’s what the big studies say. You should read them.

So I did. The big studies, the little ones, and all the rest. I read everything I could find. I talked to every psychiatrist and brain scientist who would talk to me. And I soon realized that in all my years as a journalist I had never seen a story where the gap between insider and outsider knowledge was so great, or the stakes so high.

I began to wonder why—with the stocks of cannabis companies soaring and politicians promoting legalization as a low-risk way to raise tax revenue and reduce crime—I had never heard the truth about marijuana, mental illness, and violence.

***

Over the last 30 years, psychiatrists and epidemiologists have turned speculation about marijuana’s dangers into science. Yet over the same period, a shrewd and expensive lobbying campaign has pushed public attitudes about marijuana the other way. And the effects are now becoming apparent.

Almost everything you think you know about the health effects of cannabis, almost everything advocates and the media have told you for a generation, is wrong.

They’ve told you marijuana has many different medical uses. In reality marijuana and THC, its active ingredient, have been shown to work only in a few narrow conditions. They are most commonly prescribed for pain relief. But they are rarely tested against other pain relief drugs like ibuprofen—and in July, a large four-year study of patients with chronic pain in Australia showed cannabis use was associated with greater pain over time.

They’ve told you cannabis can stem opioid use—“Two new studies show how marijuana can help fight the opioid epidemic,” according to Wonkblog, a Washington Post website, in April 2018— and that marijuana’s effects as a painkiller make it a potential substitute for opiates. In reality, like alcohol, marijuana is too weak as a painkiller to work for most people who truly need opiates, such as terminal cancer patients. Even cannabis advocates, like Rob Kampia, the co-founder of the Marijuana Policy Project, acknowledge that they have always viewed medical marijuana laws primarily as a way to protect recreational users.

As for the marijuana-reduces-opiate-use theory, it is based largely on a single paper comparing overdose deaths by state before 2010 to the spread of medical marijuana laws— and the paper’s finding is probably a result of simple geographic coincidence. The opiate epidemic began in Appalachia, while the first states to legalize medical marijuana were in the West. Since 2010, as both the epidemic and medical marijuana laws have spread nationally, the finding has vanished. And the United States, the Western country with the most cannabis use, also has by far the worst problem with opioids.

Research on individual users—a better way to trace cause and effect than looking at aggregate state-level data—consistently shows that marijuana use leads to other drug use. For example, a January 2018 paper in the American Journal of Psychiatry showed that people who used cannabis in 2001 were almost three times as likely to use opiates three years later, even after adjusting for other potential risks.

Most of all, advocates have told you that marijuana is not just safe for people with psychiatric problems like depression, but that it is a potential treatment for those patients. On its website, the cannabis delivery service Eaze offers the “Best Marijuana Strains and Products for Treating Anxiety.” “How Does Cannabis Help Depression?” is the topic of an article on Leafly, the largest cannabis website. But a mountain of peer-reviewed research in top medical journals shows that marijuana can cause or worsen severe mental illness, especially psychosis, the medical term for a break from reality. Teenagers who smoke marijuana regularly are about three times as likely to develop schizophrenia, the most devastating psychotic disorder.

After an exhaustive review, the National Academy of Medicine found in 2017 that “cannabis use is likely to increase the risk of developing schizophrenia and other psychoses; the higher the use, the greater the risk.” Also that “regular cannabis use is likely to increase the risk for developing social anxiety disorder.”

***

Over the past decade, as legalization has spread, patterns of marijuana use—and the drug itself—have changed in dangerous ways.

Legalization has not led to a huge increase in people using the drug casually. About 15 percent of Americans used cannabis at least once in 2017, up from ten percent in 2006, according to a large federal study called the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. (By contrast, about 65 percent of Americans had a drink in the last year.) But the number of Americans who use cannabis heavily is soaring. In 2006, about three million Americans reported using cannabis at least 300 times a year, the standard for daily use. By 2017, that number had nearly tripled, to eight million, approaching the twelve million Americans who drank alcohol every day. Put another way, one in 15 drinkers consumed alcohol daily; about one in five marijuana users used cannabis that often.

Cannabis users today are also consuming a drug that is far more potent than ever before, as measured by the amount of THC—delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the chemical in cannabis responsible for its psychoactive effects—it contains. In the 1970s, the last time this many Americans used cannabis, most marijuana contained less than two percent THC. Today, marijuana routinely contains 20 to 25 percent THC, thanks to sophisticated farming and cloning techniques—as well as to a demand by users for cannabis that produces a stronger high more quickly. In states where cannabis is legal, many users prefer extracts that are nearly pure THC. Think of the difference between near-beer and a martini, or even grain alcohol, to understand the difference.

These new patterns of use have caused problems with the drug to soar. In 2014, people who had diagnosable cannabis use disorder, the medical term for marijuana abuse or addiction, made up about 1.5 percent of Americans. But they accounted for eleven percent of all the psychosis cases in emergency rooms—90,000 cases, 250 a day, triple the number in 2006. In states like Colorado, emergency room physicians have become experts on dealing with cannabis-induced psychosis.

Cannabis advocates often argue that the drug can’t be as neurotoxic as studies suggest, because otherwise Western countries would have seen population-wide increases in psychosis alongside rising use. In reality, accurately tracking psychosis cases is impossible in the United States. The government carefully tracks diseases like cancer with central registries, but no such registry exists for schizophrenia or other severe mental illnesses.

On the other hand, research from Finland and Denmark, two countries that track mental illness more comprehensively, shows a significant increase in psychosis since 2000, following an increase in cannabis use. And in September of last year, a large federal survey found a rise in serious mental illness in the United States as well, especially among young adults, the heaviest users of cannabis.

According to this latter study, 7.5 percent of adults age 18-25 met the criteria for serious mental illness in 2017, double the rate in 2008. What’s especially striking is that adolescents age 12-17 don’t show these increases in cannabis use and severe mental illness.

A caveat: this federal survey doesn’t count individual cases, and it lumps psychosis with other severe mental illness. So it isn’t as accurate as the Finnish or Danish studies. Nor do any of these studies prove that rising cannabis use has caused population-wide increases in psychosis or other mental illness. The most that can be said is that they offer intriguing evidence of a link.

Advocates for people with mental illness do not like discussing the link between schizophrenia and crime. They fear it will stigmatize people with the disease. “Most people with mental illness are not violent,” the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) explains on its website. But wishing away the link can’t make it disappear. In truth, psychosis is a shockingly high risk factor for violence. The best analysis came in a 2009 paper in PLOS Medicine by Dr. Seena Fazel, an Oxford University psychiatrist and epidemiologist. Drawing on earlier studies, the paper found that people with schizophrenia are five times as likely to commit violent crimes as healthy people, and almost 20 times as likely to commit homicide.

NAMI’s statement that most people with mental illness are not violent is of course accurate, given that “most” simply means “more than half”; but it is deeply misleading. Schizophrenia is rare. But people with the disorder commit an appreciable fraction of all murders, in the range of six to nine percent.

“The best way to deal with the stigma is to reduce the violence,” says Dr. Sheilagh Hodgins, a professor at the University of Montreal who has studied mental illness and violence for more than 30 years.

The marijuana-psychosis-violence connection is even stronger than those figures suggest. People with schizophrenia are only moderately more likely to become violent than healthy people when they are taking antipsychotic medicine and avoiding recreational drugs. But when they use drugs, their risk of violence skyrockets. “You don’t just have an increased risk of one thing—these things occur in clusters,” Dr. Fazel told me.

Along with alcohol, the drug that psychotic patients use more than any other is cannabis: a 2010 review of earlier studies in Schizophrenia Bulletin found that 27 percent of people with schizophrenia had been diagnosed with cannabis use disorder in their lives. And unfortunately—despite its reputation for making users relaxed and calm—cannabis appears to provoke many of them to violence.

A Swiss study of 265 psychotic patients published in Frontiers of Forensic Psychiatry last June found that over a three-year period, young men with psychosis who used cannabis had a 50 percent chance of becoming violent. That risk was four times higher than for those with psychosis who didn’t use, even after adjusting for factors such as alcohol use. Other researchers have produced similar findings. A 2013 paper in an Italian psychiatric journal examined almost 1,600 psychiatric patients in southern Italy and found that cannabis use was associated with a ten-fold increase in violence.

The most obvious way that cannabis fuels violence in psychotic people is through its tendency to cause paranoia—something even cannabis advocates acknowledge the drug can cause. The risk is so obvious that users joke about it and dispensaries advertise certain strains as less likely to induce paranoia. And for people with psychotic disorders, paranoia can fuel extreme violence. A 2007 paper in the Medical Journal of Australia on 88 defendants who had committed homicide during psychotic episodes found that most believed they were in danger from the victim, and almost two-thirds reported misusing cannabis—more than alcohol and amphetamines combined.

Yet the link between marijuana and violence doesn’t appear limited to people with preexisting psychosis. Researchers have studied alcohol and violence for generations, proving that alcohol is a risk factor for domestic abuse, assault, and even murder. Far less work has been done on marijuana, in part because advocates have stigmatized anyone who raises the issue. But studies showing that marijuana use is a significant risk factor for violence have quietly piled up. Many of them weren’t even designed to catch the link, but they did. Dozens of such studies exist, covering everything from bullying by high school students to fighting among vacationers in Spain.

In most cases, studies find that the risk is at least as significant as with alcohol. A 2012 paper in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence examined a federal survey of more than 9,000 adolescents and found that marijuana use was associated with a doubling of domestic violence; a 2017 paper in Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology examined drivers of violence among 6,000 British and Chinese men and found that drug use—the drug nearly always being cannabis—translated into a five-fold increase in violence.

Today that risk is translating into real-world impacts. Before states legalized recreational cannabis, advocates said that legalization would let police focus on hardened criminals rather than marijuana smokers and thus reduce violent crime. Some advocates go so far as to claim that legalization has reduced violent crime. In a 2017 speech calling for federal legalization, U.S. Senator Cory Booker said that “states [that have legalized marijuana] are seeing decreases in violent crime.” He was wrong.

The first four states to legalize marijuana for recreational use were Colorado and Washington in 2014 and Alaska and Oregon in 2015. Combined, those four states had about 450 murders and 30,300 aggravated assaults in 2013. Last year, they had almost 620 murders and 38,000 aggravated assaults—an increase of 37 percent for murders and 25 percent for aggravated assaults, far greater than the national increase, even after accounting for differences in population growth.

Knowing exactly how much of the increase is related to cannabis is impossible without researching every crime. But police reports, news stories, and arrest warrants suggest a close link in many cases. For example, last September, police in Longmont, Colorado, arrested Daniel Lopez for stabbing his brother Thomas to death as a neighbor watched. Daniel Lopez had been diagnosed with schizophrenia and was “self-medicating” with marijuana, according to an arrest affidavit.

In every state, not just those where marijuana is legal, cases like Lopez’s are far more common than either cannabis or mental illness advocates acknowledge. Cannabis is also associated with a disturbing number of child deaths from abuse and neglect—many more than alcohol, and more than cocaine, methamphetamines, and opioids combined—according to reports from Texas, one of the few states to provide detailed information on drug use by perpetrators.

These crimes rarely receive more than local attention. Psychosis-induced violence takes particularly ugly forms and is frequently directed at helpless family members. The elite national media prefers to ignore the crimes as tabloid fodder. Even police departments, which see this violence up close, have been slow to recognize the trend, in part because the epidemic of opioid overdose deaths has overwhelmed them.

So the black tide of psychosis and the red tide of violence are rising steadily, almost unnoticed, on a slow green wave.

For centuries, people worldwide have understood that cannabis causes mental illness and violence—just as they’ve known that opiates cause addiction and overdose. Hard data on the relationship between marijuana and madness dates back 150 years, to British asylum registers in India. Yet 20 years ago, the United States moved to encourage wider use of cannabis and opiates.

In both cases, we decided we could outsmart these drugs—that we could have their benefits without their costs. And in both cases we were wrong. Opiates are riskier, and the overdose deaths they cause a more imminent crisis, so we have focused on those. But soon enough the mental illness and violence that follow cannabis use will also be too widespread to ignore.

Whether to use cannabis, or any drug, is a personal decision. Whether cannabis should be legal is a political issue. But its precise legal status is far less important than making sure that anyone who uses it is aware of its risks. Most cigarette smokers don’t die of lung cancer. But we have made it widely known that cigarettes cause cancer, full stop. Most people who drink and drive don’t have fatal accidents. But we have highlighted the cases of those who do.

We need equally unambiguous and well-funded advertising campaigns on the risks of cannabis. Instead, we are now in the worst of all worlds. Marijuana is legal in some states, illegal in others, dangerously potent, and sold without warnings everywhere.

But before we can do anything, we—especially cannabis advocates and those in the elite media who have for too long credulously accepted their claims—need to come to terms with the truth about the science on marijuana. That adjustment may be painful. But the alternative is far worse, as the patients at Mid-Hudson Forensic Psychiatric Institute—and their victims—know.

Alex Berenson is a graduate of Yale University with degrees in history and economics. He began his career in journalism in 1994 as a business reporter for the Denver Post, joined the financial news website TheStreet.com in 1996, and worked as an investigative reporter for The New York Times from 1999 to 2010, during which time he also served two stints as an Iraq War correspondent. In 2006 he published The Faithful Spy, which won the 2007 Edgar Award for best first novel from the Mystery Writers of America. He has published ten additional novels and two nonfiction books, The Number: How the Drive for Quarterly Earnings Corrupted Wall Street and Corporate Americaand Tell Your Children: The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence.

PANS PANDAS & Autoimmune Encephalitis – Rickert Hong

https://www.corebrainjournal.com/2019/01/292-pans-pandas-autimmune-encephalitis-rickert-hong/

292 PANS PANDAS & Autoimmune Encephalitis – Rickert-Hong

PANS, PANDASPhoto by Mohamed Abdelgaffar from Pexels

Urgent Childhood and Adult Psychiatric Details So Often Overlooked

So many kids these days have rages, OCD, tics, aggressive behavior, prolonged tantrums and anxietyall living downstream from PANS, PANDAS and Autoimmune Encephalitis.

If these profound and puzzling symptoms prevail you must look into PANS (Pediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome), PANDAS (Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Strep) and Autoimmune Encephalitis – especially if your child exhibited sudden behavioral changes or a markedly unpredictable developmental regression.

Listen up; Maria spells out your options.

Autism, ADHD, Executive Function, and Sensory Processing Disorder

Even kids with autism, ADHD and Sensory Processing Disorder should be evaluated for this condition as some practitioners believe that nearly 2/3 of kids with neurodevelopmental disorders also suffer from PANS. As you listeners know, and those of you who have followed our updates over the years, immunity is a relentless and ubiquitous focus in my offices for treatment failure for many years.

The good news: if you identify it correctly and take the necessary steps treatment failure will often, quite surprisingly, turn around.

Note Well

  • PANS is an umbrella term that includes diagnoses such as Lyme disease, PANDAS, PITANDS (Pediatric Infection-Triggered Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders), and Autoimmune Encephalitis — all of which describe a condition marked by concerning psychiatric and physical symptoms that often, but now always, appear suddenly.
  • Children in the U.S. now suffer from PANS at a very concerning rate – it’s far more prevalent than many assume.

In this CBJ/292 Episode, We Discuss

  • What PANS, PANDAS and Autoimmune Encephalitis are and why so many children are being diagnosed with these conditions.
  • What causes PANS.
  • Why PANS is so commonly seen in children with autism.
  • How PANS is treated.
  • How to get to the root cause(s) of PANS.
  • What parents of children with PANS have done to bring their children back to good health.
  • What leading PANS experts have to say about the cause and treatment of PANS.

Maria co-wrote this book with remarkable colleagues at Epidemic Answers: Beth Lambert, Roseann Capanna-Hodge, Lauren Stone and Jennifer Giustra-Kozek. We’re excited to present this resource to you in your quest for improving your child’s health!

Connections

CBJ Experts On Similar Insights

 

About our mission, Dr. Charles Parker

Our CBJ hosting objective is critical: upgrade mind and brain data through informed dialogue with neuroscience experts to build more predictable, more comprehensive, more understandable solutions for you and your family. Today’s technology drives significantly improved mind-prognosis – beyond traditional psychiatric measures. Inaccurate labels, speculation, and guesswork are out – critical thinking, data, and measurement are in. Let’s work together to connect advanced biomedical wisdom with everyday street reality. 

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More on PANS/PANDAS/Autoimmune encephalitis:

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/12/01/guidelines-for-treating-pans-its-real/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/12/17/my-kid-is-not-crazy-study-shows-1-3-kids-with-pans-have-hallucinations/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/06/30/child-with-lymemsidspans-told-by-doctors-she-made-it-all-up/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/07/28/stories-of-pandas/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/01/05/scary-side-of-childhood-strep/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/11/06/diagnosing-treating-autoimmune-encephalitis-in-patients-with-persistent-lyme-symptoms/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/10/01/panspandas-steroids-autoimmune-disease-lymemsids-the-need-for-medical-collaboration/  Boy’s Lyme Disease Morphs into Autoimmune encephalopathy.  It took 10 years and 20 doctors to find out 12-year-old Patrik had Lyme disease. Just 4 months later the doctors discovered he also has a condition where his immune system attacks his brain.

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/01/24/toddler-suffering-from-hallucinations-seizures-diagnosed-with-rare-brain-disease/

Spread the word!  Many doctors are still in denial about these conditions.

 

 

 

The Mack Talks – Lyme Disease

 Approx. 48 Min.

The Mack Talks

Episode #6:  Dr. Roseann Capanna-Hodge

Published on Jan 17, 2019

Dr. Roseann Capanna-Hodge is a board certified Psychologist and expert in the field of Neurofeedback, Biofeedback and Holistic Therapies to aid in the healing of her clients. With her eponymous clinic (Dr. Roseann Capanna-Hodge & Associates) she is able to provide her specialized services for her community.
Listen in as we discuss the beginning of her career, her dedication to helping those with mental and physical illnesses, and her take on Lyme Disease.
Highlights from this Podcast:
» 7:30 The current state of children and mental health
» 15:08 Educating other Medical Professions on the importance of holistic therapies
» 26:05 Discussion on Lyme Disease
About the Mack Talks: The Mack Talks is a sit-down discussion with business owners, entrepreneurs, and impactful leaders led by hosts Scott Johnson and Chase Hutchison.
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**Comment**
Many great points made here including the involvement with Bartonella – known to cause psychiatric symptoms.
Hodge has a son with PANS brought on by tick borne illness.
She comments about the high variability of rashes.
She also discusses testing. (Dogs are tested every 6 months)
She states, “Late Stage Lyme,” can occur within 2 weeks of tick bite.  Many physicians do not understand that patients can jump around the stages and not even appear to have certain stages.  This is shown here by the little girl who within 4-6 hours couldn’t walk or talk after a tick bite above the eye:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/12/07/igenex-presentation/
She wrote, “Brain Under Attack,” review here:  https://thinkingmomsrevolution.com/book-review-brain-attack/

 

Did Charles Darwin Have Lyme Disease?

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/did-charles-darwin-have-lyme-disease-180971189/

Did Charles Darwin Have Lyme Disease?

New study attributes British naturalist’s persistent poor health to tick-borne disease

By Meilan Solly

SMITHSONIAN.COM
JANUARY 8, 2019

Throughout his adult life, Charles Darwin was plagued by bouts of poor health, including “incessant vomiting,” trembling hands, a “swimming” head,” “singing in the ears” (likely linked with tinnitus), and “violent palpitation of the heart.” Historians have long puzzled over the exact nature of Darwin’s ailments, proposing diagnoses like Chagas disease, lactose intolerance and a mitochondrial disorder. But as George Dvorsky reports for Gizmodo, a new study identifies a previously unmentioned culprit: Lyme disease.

The findings, now published in Denisea, the official scientific journal of the Natural History Museum Rotterdam, posit that the naturalist contracted the tick-borne disease in the somewhat surprising locale of his home country, Great Britain. Although Darwin visited numerous tropical regions during his famed voyage on the H.M.S. Beagle and subsequent research expeditions, the researchers argue it’s more likely he encountered an infectious tick while roaming the expanses of England, Wales and Scotland. Despite the fact that Lyme disease wasn’t formally diagnosed until 1976, Dvorsky notes that instances of the tick-borne disease abound in late 19th- and early 20th-century European records.

Lead researcher Erwin Kompanje of Rotterdam’s Erasmus University medical centre tells the Guardian’s Ian Sample that “[Darwin] had a lot of different symptoms: involuntary twitching of muscles, swimming of the head, a shortness of breath, trembling hands.

He adds, “All of them came and went, and that is quite typical of Lyme disease.”

To analyze Darwin’s maladies, Kompanje and study co-author Jelle Reumer of the Natural History Museum Rotterdam sifted through the scientist’s copious body of correspondence and personal writings. These accounts, many of which are available through the University of Cambridge’s online Darwin portal, offer a portrait of a man beset by chronic illness. In a March 28, 1949, letter to a friend named Joseph Hooker, for example, Darwin explains,

“I was not able to do anything one day out of three, [and] was altogether too dispirited to write to you or to do anything but what I was compelled.”

According to the study, Darwin’s symptoms can be divided into three categories: dysautonomic (or related to the autonomic nervous system), neurological and psychiatric; gastrointestinal; and cutaneous (affecting the skin). The first group of ailments closely resembled what we would now call a panic disorder, with key complaints, including fatigue, dizziness and heart palpitations. Some studies have drawn on these symptoms to suggest Darwin suffered from agoraphobia, but the new study points out that his wife, Emma, once wrote “he always tells me how he … never wants to be alone”— a sentiment not likely shared by most true agoraphobics. Indeed, the authors note that recent research has linked the sudden onset of panic attacks with underlying Lyme disease. Upon receiving treatment for Lyme, some patients have reported these symptoms abated. Overall, the researchers attribute this group of symptoms to “atypical panic attacks.”

The second category of gastrointestinal symptoms—amongst others, flatulence, vomiting and nausea—has previously been attributed to Crohn’s disease or lactose intolerance. Adding to the mix, the study proposes yet another disorder: Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome, which is marked by periods of debilitating vomiting triggered by “stress, excitement and fatigue.”

Finally, in reference to Darwin’s recorded battles with rashes and eczema, the authors suggest that such skin inflammations emerged as a side effect of panic disorder, which they in turn identify as “a rare symptom of chronic borreliosis,” or Lyme disease.

As the Guardian’s Sample notes, the popular diagnosis of Chagas disease, an infection spread by insects native to the Americas, originates from Darwin’s mention of being bitten by a “great black bug of the Pampas” during an 1835 trip to Argentina. But Kompanje and Reumer say that the naturalist’s symptoms align more closely with Lyme disease, in part because certain recurring complaints appeared before the South American expedition.

The pair’s final assessment of a “complex condition with multisystem symptoms” pinpoints Lyme as Darwin’s major affliction, but as Dvorsky explains for Gizmodo, the researchers believe another illness, likely lactose intolerance, contributed to the scientist’s poor health. Combined with what the study terms Darwin’s “hypochondriac predisposition,” it’s unsurprising that his litany of illnesses continues to fascinate.

Still, not everyone is convinced: Richard Wall, a tick expert at the University of Bristol, tells the Guardian, “Borreliosis is a particularly difficult infection to diagnose symptomatically even when the patient is available … so retrospective diagnosis at a historical distance of 200 years, while interesting, must be considered as highly speculative.”

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For more:  

Panic Attacks:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/05/19/panic-attacks-may-be-lyme-msids/  The author describes the histories of three patients with panic-like episodes that turned out to be related to underlying, previously unsuspected tick-borne diseases.

Tinnitus, tingling, numbness, twitching:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2015/09/16/bizarre-symptoms-msids/

Hearing Loss:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/05/19/panic-attacks-may-be-lyme-msids/

Shortness of breath/air hunger:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/03/22/what-is-air-hunger-anyway/

Brain fog:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/03/22/what-is-air-hunger-anyway/

Heart issues:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/06/03/heart-problems-tick-borne-disease/

Rashes:  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130422132507.htm?

Clinical diagnosis must consider any skin rash, regardless of its resemblance to the bull’s-eye.  Many people never recall a rash or tick bite. “Researchers note that multiple textbooks and websites prominently feature the bull’s-eye image as a visual representation of Lyme disease.” They write, “This emphasis on target-like lesions may have inadvertently contributed to an underappreciation for atypical skin lesions caused by Lyme disease.”Some Visible Signs of Lyme Disease Are Easily Missed or Mistaken, Science Daily, Apr 22, 2013

“Not everything is Lyme, but Lyme can be anything.”  Dr. Hoffman RIP

 

 

Schizophrenia Linked With Abnormal Immune Response to Epstein-Barr Virus

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/news/newsroom/news-releases/schizophrenia-linked-with-abnormal-immune-response-to-epstein-barr-virus

Schizophrenia Linked with Abnormal Immune Response to Epstein-Barr Virus

01/09/2019
New research from Johns Hopkins Medicine and Sheppard Pratt Health System shows that people in the study with schizophrenia also have higher levels of antibodies against the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a herpes virus that causes infectious mononucleosis, so-called mono.

 

Researchers proposed two explanations for the association of heightened immune responses in patients with schizophrenia and EBV infection: schizophrenia might alter the immune systems of these patients and make them more susceptible to EBV, or EBV infection might increase the risk of schizophrenia.

The article was published online Nov. 20 in Schizophrenia Bulletin.

“We are interested in the role of infectious agents such as Epstein-Barr virus in schizophrenia and other serious psychiatric disorders, so we did this study to look at the associations,” said Robert Yolken, M.D., the Theodore and Vada Stanley Distinguished Professor of Neurovirology in pediatrics at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center and senior author of the study. Yolken cautioned that the study wasn’t designed to determine cause and effect.

Schizophrenia is a mental disorder where patients have distorted thinking, perception, emotions, language, sense of self and behavior. According to the World Health Organization, schizophrenia affects more than 21 million people worldwide.

While schizophrenia has some genetic associations, genes that have been found to date explain only a portion of the disease risk. Environmental exposures, including to some infectious agents, have also been identified in previous studies as increasing the risk for schizophrenia.

EBV initially causes fever and swollen lymph nodes, and is commonly transmitted through oral contact such as kissing. In severe cases, it can spread to the central nervous system and cause persistent infection. Researchers wanted to see the relationship between this EBV infection and schizophrenia.

The researchers conducted a study among 743 people—432 with a schizophrenia diagnosis and 311 without a history of a psychiatric disorder to serve as a control group. Around 55 percent of the participants were men.

The researchers first measured levels of antibodies against components of EBV by comparing antibody levels in healthy people with those of people who have schizophrenia. They looked at the odds of having these antibodies in the 50th, 75th and 90th percentiles and found that people with schizophrenia were 1.7 to 2.3 times more likely to have increased levels of some EBV antibodies compared with people without schizophrenia.

Then they measured the antibodies to other related viruses such as varicella/chicken pox or herpes simplex type 1/cold sore virus, and didn’t find an increase of antibodies against these viruses in people with schizophrenia. These findings suggest that only EBV was associated with increased risk of schizophrenia.

After that, the researchers sequenced a portion of the participants’ DNA to determine their genetic risk for schizophrenia. Results from the analysis showed that people who had both evidence of increased genetic risk for schizophrenia and increased antibody levels to EBV had a more than eight times higher chance of being in the schizophrenia group as compared with controls. Approximately 10 percent of the individuals with schizophrenia had increased levels of both antibodies and genetic risk as compared with slightly more than 1 percent of the controls.

“We found that individuals with schizophrenia had an unusual response to Epstein-Barr virus,” said Yolken. “This indicated that the prevention and treatment of Epstein-Barr virus might represent an approach for the prevention and treatment of serious psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.”

Currently, there are no treatments available for EBV approved by the Food and Drug Administration, but a number of compounds that may prevent or treat replication of the virus are under investigation. The researchers considered the development of these approaches a high priority so that people with schizophrenia or other disorders associated with susceptibility to EBV could use them. In the meantime, researchers recommend preventing EBV transmission through good hygienic practices such as hand-washing and avoiding oral contact, such as kissing, with infected people. 

The study is supported by the National Institute of Mental Health (MH-94268) and by the Stanley Medical Research Institute (07-1690).

Other authors on the study included Lorraine Jones-Brando of Johns Hopkins; Faith Dickerson, Cassie Stallings, Andrea Origoni, Emily Katsafanas, Kevin Sweeney and Sunil Khushalani from the Stanley Research Program at Sheppard Pratt; Glen Ford from VanPelt Biosciences; Giulio Genovese and Colm O’Dushlaine from Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.

This press release is modified from a release prepared by Sheppard Pratt Health System.

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**Comment**

EBV & other viruses can be key players with Lyme/MSIDS:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/04/11/diagnosed-with-ebv-had-lyme/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/04/25/ebv-protein-can-turn-on-genes-for-autoimmune-diseases/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/11/04/24514/  (EBV – A Key player in Chronic Illness & Tips to Treat Reactivated EBV)

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/09/30/he-got-schizophrenia-he-got-cancer-and-then-he-got-cured/

A decade ago, Dr. Miyaoka accidentally discovered one. He treated two schizophrenia patients who were both institutionalized, and practically catatonic, with minocycline, an old antibiotic usually used for acne. Both completely normalized on the antibiotic.When Dr. Miyaoka stopped it, their psychosis returned. So he prescribed the patients a low dose on a continuing basis and discharged them.

Minocycline has since been studied by others. Larger trials suggest that it’s an effective add-on treatment for schizophrenia. Some have argued that it works because it tamps down inflammation in the brain. But it’s also possible that it affects the microbiome — the community of microbes in the human body — and thus changes how the immune system works.

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/09/20/schizophrenia-breakthrough-identifies-importance-of-immune-cells/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/10/03/treat-the-infection-psychiatric-symptoms-get-better/  LLMD, Dr. Horowtiz, goes on record stating that antibiotics are effective in Schizophrenia. With irony he points out that the authors attribute the reason minocycline helped these patients is due to its ability to affect glutamate pathways in the CNS, blocking nitric oxide-induced neurotoxicity, and inflammation in the brain. He reminds them that minocycline is a tetracycline antibiotic that very well may be treating an infection. He also emphatically states that he has had several schizophrenic patients test positive for Bb, the agent of Lyme Disease. After taking doxycycline they improved significantly and with the help of their psychiatrist, were able to reduce and in some cases eliminate all of their antipsychotic medication. It is important to note that patients remained stable on antibiotics but their symptoms returned if they stopped treatment.

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/06/04/minocycline-for-ms-and-much-more/  BTW:  Mino was one of the most effective meds for my neuro issues and severe occipital headaches.  It crosses the blood brain barrier.

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/01/17/lymemsids-and-psychiatric-illness/  In this presentation, Dr. Markes questions if psychiatric disorders are inflammatory diseases. She lists: Autism, Alzheimer’s, Schizophrenia, Bipolar, PTSD, Depression, Stress, Sleep Deprivation, Self-harm, and Suicide Attempts. She also describes a study in England observing children for over a decade in which children with a high IL-8 at age 8 have an 81% change of developing depression by age 18 and a 2-fold chance of becoming psychotic.