Archive for the ‘Lyme’ Category

In vitro and in vivo Evaluation of Cephalosporins for the Treatment of Lyme Disease

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/30254421/

In vitro and in vivo evaluation of cephalosporins for the treatment of Lyme disease.

Pothineni VR, et al. Drug Des Devel Ther. 2018. doi: 10.2147/DDDT.S164966. eCollection 2018.

Abstract

Background: Lyme disease accounts for >90% of all vector-borne disease cases in the United States and affect ~300,000 persons annually in North America. Though traditional tetracycline antibiotic therapy is generally prescribed for Lyme disease, still 10%-20% of patients treated with current antibiotic therapy still show lingering symptoms.

Methods: In order to identify new drugs, we have evaluated four cephalosporins as a therapeutic alternative to commonly used antibiotics for the treatment of Lyme disease by using microdilution techniques like minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). We have determined the MIC and MBC of four drugs for three Borrelia burgdorferi s.s strains namely CA8, JLB31 and NP40. The binding studies were performed using in silico analysis.

Results: The MIC order of the four drugs tested is cefoxitin (1.25 µM/mL) > cefamandole (2.5 µM/mL), > cefuroxime (5 µM/mL) > cefapirin (10 µM/mL). Among the drugs that are tested in this study using in vivo C3H/HeN mouse model, cefoxitin effectively kills B. burgdorferi. The in silico analysis revealed that all four cephalosporins studied binds effectively to B. burgdorferi proteins, SecA subunit penicillin-binding protein (PBP) and Outer surface protein E (OspE).

Conclusion: Based on the data obtained, cefoxitin has shown high efficacy killing B. burgdorferi at concentration of 1.25 µM/mL. In addition to it, cefoxitin cleared B. burgdorferi infection in C3H/HeN mice model at 20 mg/kg.

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For more on Dr. Lewis’ work:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/08/06/meet-the-researcher-kim-lewis-ph-d/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/10/31/news-story-on-researcher-kim-lewis-and-chronic-lyme/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/08/24/identifying-vancomycin-as-an-effective-antibiotic-for-killing-bb/

 

All His Symptoms Pointed Toward the Flu. But the Test Was Negative. RMSF in Connecticut

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/17/magazine/flu-symptoms-diagnosis-infection.html

All His Symptoms Pointed Toward the Flu. But the Test Was Negative.

CreditCreditIllustration by Andreas Samuelsson

 

“I think I’m losing this battle,” the 58-year-old man told his wife one Saturday night nearly a year ago.

While she was at the theater — they’d bought the tickets months earlier — he had to crawl up the stairs on his hands and knees to get to bed. Terrible bone-shaking chills racked him, despite the thick layer of blankets. The chills were followed by sudden blasts of internal heat and drenching sweats that made him kick off the covers — only to haul them back up as the cycle repeated itself.

“I need to go to the E.R.,” he told his wife. He’d been there three times already. They’d give him intravenous fluids and send him home with the diagnosis of a viral syndrome. He would start to feel better soon, he was told. But he didn’t.

This all began nine days before. That first day he called in sick to his job as a physical therapist. He felt feverish and achy, as if he had the flu. He decided to drink plenty of fluids, take it easy and go back to work the next day. But the next day he felt even worse. That’s when the fever and chills really kicked in. He was alternating between acetaminophen and ibuprofen, but the fever never let up. He’d started sleeping in the guest room because his sweat was soaking the sheets, and his chills shook the bed, waking his wife.

After three days of this, he made his first visit to the Yale New Haven Hospital emergency room. He was already taking antibiotics. Several weekends earlier, he developed a red, swollen elbow and went to an urgent-care center, where he was started on one antibiotic for a presumed infection. He took it for 10 days, but his elbow was still killing him. He went back to urgent care, where he was started on a broader-spectrum drug, which he had nearly finished. Now his elbow was fine. It was the rest of his body that ached as if he had the flu.

But at the hospital, his flu swab was negative. So was his chest X-ray. It was probably just a virus, he was told. He should take it easy until it passed. And come back if he got any worse.

The next day his fever spiked above 105. He went again to the E.R. It was a mob scene — crowded with people who, like him, appeared to have the flu. It would be hours before he could be seen, he was told, because they already knew he didn’t have it. Discouraged, he went home to bed. He went back the next morning after a nurse called to say the E.R. was more manageable.

He might not have the flu, he thought, but he was sure he had something. But the E.R. doctor didn’t know what. He didn’t have chest pain or shortness of breath. No cough, no headache, no rash, no abdominal pain, no urinary symptoms. He felt weak but no longer achy. His heart was beating hard and fast, but otherwise his exam was fine. His white count was low — which was a little strange. White blood cells are expected to increase with an acute infection. Still, a virus can cause white counts to drop. His platelets — the tiny blood fragments that form clots — were also low. That can also be seen in viral infections, but it was less common.

The E.R. staff sent the abnormal blood results to the patient’s primary-care provider and told the patient to follow up with him. He’d been trying get in to see him for days, but the doctor’s schedule was full. When he called again, he was told that the soonest he could be seen was the following week.

The patient asked the doctor to order blood tests to look for an infection in his blood. And could they also test him for tick-borne infections? This was Connecticut, after all. He dragged himself to the lab and then waited for his doctor to call with the results. The call never came. In his mind, he fired his doctor. He’d been sick for over a week, and the doctor’s office couldn’t arrange an appointment, and they couldn’t even call him with the lab results for the test he had to ask for in the first place.

That Sunday morning after the man’s wife had been to the theater, he went once more to the emergency room. It was brought to the attention of the physician assistant on duty that the man had been there several times before and had lab abnormalities. She ordered a bunch of blood tests — looking for everything from H.I.V. to mono. She ordered another chest X-ray and started him on broad-spectrum antibiotics, as well as doxycycline, an antibiotic often used for tick-borne infections. He was given Tylenol for his fever and admitted to the hospital. As he was preparing to leave the emergency department, a new flu test came back positive. He was pretty sure he didn’t have it; he’d never heard of a flu being this bad for this long. But if he could stay in the hospital, where someone could monitor him, he was happy to take Tamiflu.

The lab called again the next day to say that the test had been read incorrectly; he did not have the flu. By then other results started to come in. It wasn’t an infection in his elbow. He didn’t have H.I.V.; he didn’t have mono or Lyme; he didn’t have any of the other respiratory viruses that, along with the worse influenza outbreak in years, had filled up so much of the hospital.

CreditIllustration by Andreas Samuelsson

Yet after a couple of days, the patient began to feel better. His fever came down. The shaking chills disappeared. His white count and platelets edged up. It was clear he was recovering, but from what? More blood tests were ordered, and an infectious-disease specialist consulted.

Gabriel Vilchez, the infectious-disease specialist in training, reviewed the chart and examined the patient. He thought that the patient most likely had a tick-borne infection. The hospital had sent off blood to test for the usual suspects in the Northeast: Lyme, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis. Except for the Lyme test, which was negative, none of the results had come back yet. Vilchez considered that given the patient’s symptoms — and his response to the doxycycline — it would turn out that he’d have one of them.

And yet, the results for tick-borne infections were negative. Vilchez thought about other tick-borne diseases that are not on the usual panel. The most likely was Rocky Mountain spotted fever (R.M.S.F.). The name is a misnomer: R.M.S.F. is much more common in the Smoky Mountains than the Rocky Mountains, and the spotted-fever part, the rash, is not seen in all cases. It’s unusual to acquire the infection in Connecticut but not unheard-of. Vilchez sent off blood to be tested for R.M.S.F. The following day, the patient felt well enough to go home. A couple of days later, he got a call. He had Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

Why did the diagnosis take so long? The patient had an unusual infection. But perhaps the bigger issue was that he was one of many patients in the emergency room with flulike symptoms in the midst of a flu epidemic. Under those circumstances, the question for the staff simply becomes: Does he have the flu? When the answer is no, doctors tend to move on to the next very sick patient in line. It’s hard to get back to the question of what the nonflu patient does have.

For the patient, recovery has been tough. Though the antibiotic helped with the acute symptoms, it took months before he had the stamina to resume his usual patient load at work. He feels that the illness brought him as close to dying as he had ever been. Indeed, Rocky Mountain spotted fever is one of the most dangerous of all the tick-borne infections, with a mortality rate as high as 5 percent even with current antibiotics.

One thing he was certain about, however: He needed a new primary-care doctor. And he got one.

Lisa Sanders, M.D., is a contributing writer for the magazine and the author of “Every Patient Tells a Story: Medical Mysteries and the Art of Diagnosis.” If you have a solved case to share with Dr. Sanders, write her at Lisa.Sandersmd@gmail.com.

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**Comment**

This is playing out all over the world.  He was one of the lucky ones to finally get an accurate diagnosis.

It is interesting; however, that they are quick to state he doesn’t have the other tick-borne infections when the testing for all of them misses over half of all cases.  Once they gave him doxy, they should have retested him.  This is called a “provocation test” and is used by many LLMD’s (Lyme literate doctors) as they’ve learned this often finally shows an active infection(s) due to the ability of the body to NOW see the pathogens in the blood stream allowing antibodies to be made and picked up by the tests.

RMSF is a nasty beast on it’s own; however, this man should be monitored over time.  If symptoms come back or new ones show up, TBI’s should be suspected.

It’s also a mind boggler how in Connecticut of all places, TBI’s wouldn’t be the FIRST thing medical practitioners think of.  It’s literally ground zero.  

Please know RMSF IS IN WISCONSIN and is on the move:   https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/07/10/first-rmsf-death-in-wisconsin/

More on RMSF:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/09/14/rocky-mountain-spotted-fever-rmsf/

It’s also been found to be spread by the common brown dog tick:

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/08/16/new-tick-causes-epidemic-of-rmsf/  It’s usually spread by the American dog tick and the closely related Rocky Mountain wood tick. But in recent years the bacterial infection has also been spread by the brown dog tick — a completely different species…The researchers were investigating an epidemic of the infection that broke out in the border town of Mexicali starting in 2008. It’s already sickened at least 4,000 people, according to Mexican government estimates. Several hundred have died, and at least four people have died in the U.S. after crossing the border, according to this report and others.

“I was absolutely startled,” Foley said in an interview.

The people who had been sickened in Mexicali had a heavy load of the infectious agent in their blood — something that had not been seen in past outbreaks.
The epidemic is worrisome because the brown dog tick is more likely to bite people and it adapts easily to living in a house, as opposed to living on wild animals, the researchers said.

“The Rocky Mountain spotted fever epidemic in Mexicali has not been contained and may be spreading to other parts of Baja California and into the United States,” the team wrote.

And now it’s possible that for some reason, the infection the brown dog tick transmits is more virulent, Foley said.

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/06/10/two-deaths-from-rmsf-indiana-has-tbis/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2015/08/13/severe-case-of-rmsf-had-to-remove-patients-arms-and-legs/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/10/21/mom-got-rocky-mountain-spotted-fever-while-picking-pumpkins/  “When you go to these pumpkin patches and petting zoos and all those fun fall activities, wear pants, long socks and shoes!”
“Make sure you check for tics! This was me 2 years ago after being bit by a tick and contracting Rocky Mountain spotted fever at a pumpkin patch,” she continued. “I couldn’t walk, my whole body was in pain, my hair fell out, and I almost died.”

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/06/12/georgia-mom-warns-others-after-son-contracts-rocky-mountain-spotted-fever-after-tick-bite/  “This has been a horribly scary experience for our family. I’m thankful that I did my own research and brought it to my doctors attention. So don’t EVER be afraid to be an advocate for your child or yourself when it comes to things like this!” McNair continued, adding that “doctors are humans and have to figure out the puzzle just like the rest of us do!”

Wiser words were never spoken.

P.s. Regarding the red, swollen elbow…..

My journey was similar with the same issue in both my elbow and knee in the middle of January in Wisconsin.  I was told, and I promise I didn’t make this up, that I had “Washer Woman’s Knee,” and “Barstool elbow.”  

I kid you not.

Now, first, I use a mop and rarely get on my knees.  Second, I assure you, I’m not sitting at the bar and have NO reason to have a red, swollen, excruciatingly painful elbow.

Effective tick borne illness treatment completely ameliorated both conditions once I was finally diagnosed with Lyme/MSIDS.  For that exciting journey, that continues to this day, go here:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/02/24/pcos-lyme-my-story/

For effective Lyme treatment:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/02/13/lyme-disease-treatment/

Please remember, Lyme is the rock star we all know by name.  There are many, many other players involved and people are often coinfected.  Mainstream medicine has yet to accept and deal with this very real fact.

 

 

 

 

 

“Super responders” Are Key to Personalized Lyme Disease Treatment

https://www.lymedisease.org/personalized-lyme-disease-treatment/

By Lorraine Johnson

LYMEPOLICYWONK: “Super responders” are key to personalized Lyme disease treatment

I’m excited to report that the first study using information from MyLymeData has just been published in the medical journal Healthcare.

Using patient-reported outcome data from 3,900 people enrolled in MyLymeData, we looked at how individual patients vary in their response to treatment. Finding out who responds well to which treatments—and then learning more about those people—is an important step towards developing personalized Lyme disease treatment.

Treatment studies of patients with late/chronic Lyme disease usually take an average of how people have responded to treatment. But guess what? The average Lyme patient isn’t average! Some people improve a lot with treatment, some improve a little bit, and some people don’t improve at all. A few may even get worse.

Super responders

However, if we can identify the “super responders”—the ones who did particularly well—and take a closer look at them, we may be able to learn things that can help other patients in a similar situation. This can help drive the development of personalized Lyme disease treatment.

For lots of diseases, such as tuberculosis, pulmonary disease, and cancer, scientists are now identifying high treatment responders, but our study is the first to use this approach in Lyme disease.

The reason it hasn’t been done before in Lyme disease is because identifying how different groups of patients respond to treatment requires large samples. The largest trial funded by the National Institute of Health for patients with chronic Lyme disease enrolled just 129 people—way too small a group to look at individual treatment variation.

So instead, they lumped all of the treatment responses together—the good, the bad and the ugly—and said how patients responded “on average.” On average, there wasn’t much improvement from treatment.

But treatment averages don’t tell the whole story. A famous mathematician, Des MacHale, explains it this way: The average person has one testicle and one breast. And we all know how ridiculous that is. You can’t average a male and a female like that and get any meaningful information.

It’s the same thing when you measure patient treatment response in Lyme disease. If one person gets better and the other gets worse after treatment, you can say that on average, treatment did nothing. However, for the patient who got better, it made a world of difference. Yet, when we use an average to calculate treatment response, the favorable response of one patient is cancelled out by the negative response of another.

A better approach looks at variations in how different patients respond. Most Lyme disease patients already know this. Some patients get better, others get worse, and some don’t change with treatment. Treatment response variation is lost when individual responses are averaged.

In our study, we included close to 4,000 patients, a large enough sample to look at variations in treatment response. Here’s what we found. Most patients (52%) responded positively to antibiotic treatment and some—roughly a third—responded very well to treatment. These patients said that they felt moderately to a very great deal better after taking antibiotics. Very few said that they felt worse after taking antibiotics (only 12%).

If I were a patient with chronic Lyme disease—which I was by the way–I would want to know that roughly a third of those in the sample were “high treatment responders”—meaning that they reported that after taking antibiotics their symptoms improved moderately to a very great deal. This is the type of information that patients want to know and that is why we conducted this study.

This is the first of many studies to be published using the data from MyLymeData.  So stay tuned! And if you are not enrolled in MyLymeData—I encourage you to stop what you are doing and sign up now. It is only by having patients pool their data that we will make progress in this disease.

Here is a short video I recorded explaining more about the study’s results.

Click here to read the full study.

Click here to enroll in MyLymeData.

Lorraine Johnson, JD, MBA, is the Chief Executive Officer of LymeDisease.org. You can contact her at lbjohnson@lymedisease.org. On Twitter, follow her @lymepolicywonk. If you have not signed up for our patient-centered big data project, MyLymeData, please register now.

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**Comment**

If you haven’t enrolled in this Bigdata research, please do.

The more people who do this, the more information we will have to look at.

Since the largest NIH study was done in 2008, EIGHT YEARS AGO, you’d think researchers & doctors would be a bit open-minded.  Can you imagine basing cancer or AIDS treatments on EIGHT YEAR OLD STUDIES?  https://www.niaid.nih.gov/diseases-conditions/chronic-lyme-disease.  Another, done in 2003 (15 years ago) only looked at 28 days of IV antibiotic compared to placebo in 55 patients, hardly a representative sample, and what’s 28 days of IV abx going to do with a persistent pathogen typically coupled with other pathogens making cases extremely complex?

No, The Cabal has run the research in a biased and skewed manner for over 40 years.  Time for a change.

Interestingly, an IDSA founder disagreed with their stance and used high powered antibiotics quite successfully:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/07/09/idsa-founder-used-potent-iv-antibiotics-for-chronic-lyme/ 51 difficult cases are represented.

 

 

 

 

 

‘Rhony’ Star Ramona Singer Opens Up About Sister’s Devastating Battle With Lyme Disease

https://www.etonline.com/rhony-star-ramona-singer-opens-up-about-sisters-devastating-battle-with-lyme-disease-111058

‘RHONY’ Star Ramona Singer Opens Up About Sister’s Devastating Battle With Lyme Disease

By

Syed Kazmi

 

It was three decades ago when Ramona Singer first heard about Lyme disease, puzzled about what the mysterious illness was after a partner mentioned the term. Little did the Real Housewives of New York City star realize how much the disease would impact her in years to come, which would see her witness several close friends battle the disease and go on a “rampage” to find the best doctors after learning her own sister had the potentially fatal, tick-borne illness.

“I was involved with a man who’s a doctor and he volunteered at the first Lyme disease clinic at Lenox Hill maybe 30 years ago and when he first told me I said, ‘What do you mean, Lyme disease!?” Singer recalls to ET. “Then his sister started complaining about not feeling well and being fatigued — he thought she was just being a hypochondriac, then found out she had Lyme!”

Singer was later distraught to find out her own younger sister had the debilitating illness, which causes flu-like symptoms, rashes, joint and muscle pain and limb weakness. With celebrity sufferers including Avril Lavigne and Shania Twain, the disease has increased 25-fold since national surveillance began in 1982, and the common diagnostic test is inaccurate more than half the time.

While Singer is generally private about her sister’s identity and scary health battle, she’s sharing some details of the ordeal for the first time, telling how following the diagnosis, she immediately sprang into action, setting about on a mission to find the best help she could for her loved one.

“She was complaining about all kinds of pain eight years ago, to the point where she was having problems walking,” Singer, 61, shares. “We finally come to our own conclusion that this must be Lyme disease, then she was tested for it. I’ve become a maven since then. I’m aggressive, so I started calling all my friends saying, ‘My sister has Lyme disease, who do you know? Who can I call?’ I was on a rampage to find the best doctor because even once you’re diagnosed, some doctors don’t know how to treat it or can’t be bothered treating it.”

It’s incredible in this day and age how ignorant people are and the tests aren’t always foolproof,” adds Singer, who recalls talking to one sufferer who was experiencing near-psychotic episodes due to the disease reaching his brain, yet kept getting told by doctors he was mentally ill before finally being diagnosed with Lyme disease. “It’s just a really scary disease and it’s not black-and-white.”

Thanks to being detected early, Singer’s sister, now in her fifties, was able to take a 30-day course of antibiotics and make a full recovery, something the family feels eternally “blessed” about. However, several other loved ones have meanwhile been diagnosed with the illness, which is more common in East Coast areas, with one of Singer’s pals still struggling to overcome it.

One of the most gut-wrenching parts of watching those close to her suffer has been seeing how it restricts their ability to live a normal day-to-day life and witnessing the effects the disease can have on a person’s mental health.

“They just have no energy,” says Singer, who has a 23-year-old daughter, Avery. “Life is about having your health — health is everything, and if you’re waking up in the morning and feeling bedridden, you don’t want to go and meet your friends for lunch or work out. Life is about embracing your passions, whether it’s work, family or friends and this disease inhibits people’s lifestyles.”

“It also causes depression,” Singer adds. “When you’re not feeling well or you have a bad cold for a week, you get depressed because you can’t do anything.”

Singer notes how difficult it is for newly diagnosed patients to find resources, the right healthcare specialists and not “feel alone out there,” so she has become an avid supporter of the Global Lyme Alliance, which works towards conquering Lyme disease and other tick-borne disease and helps connect patients with the best doctors.

On Thursday, Singer will attend the organization’s 4th Annual New York Gala at Cipriani 42nd Street, as an honorary speaker for the event, where Younger star Sutton Foster will perform and equestrian Erin Walker (wife of golf champ Jimmy Walker) will serve as the honored guest.

Last year’s gala honored Matchbox Twenty frontman Rob Thomas’ wife, Marisol, who has been battling the disease for 15 years, with Thomas previously telling ET that Lyme disease has been “like a weird alien inhabited my wife.”

Other key supporters of the Global Lyme Alliance include Singer’s fellow Housewives franchise star and Lyme patient, Yolanda Hadid, whom she rubbed shoulders with at last year’s event. “She’s very fortunate as she has lovely children who support her tremendously and I know she has made great strides, but it took a toll on her life, her marriage and on her relationships,” Singer says. “But she has gotten through it and she’s definitely an inspiration.”

Beyond the event, Singer is keeping busy, currently selling the four-bedroom apartment which has been her family home for the last 20 years and preparing to launch her Ageless by Ramona skincare line in the spring.

Then of course there’s another season of RHONY!

With season 11 filming underway, Singer hints she’ll be back for more drama. Season 10’s dramatic finale and reunion show saw her embroiled in further drama with Bethenny Frankel, who refused to support Singer’s business ventures, failing to show up to a pre-launch event for Ageless by Ramona.

“You know, as women, we all have a camaraderie with each other — we fight with passion and we make up with passion, so that’s why the show is still relatable 11 years later,” Singer says about the conflict. “It’s like friendships, right … you have ebbs and flows, highs and lows!”

 

Avril Lavigne on Lyme Disease Battle: “I Was in Bed for F–king 2 Years”

https://www.eonline.com/news/978405/avril-lavigne-on-lyme-disease-battle-i-was-in-bed-for-f-king-two-years?

(Go to link for video.  Approx. 1 Min)
Avril Lavigne is opening up about her battle with Lyme disease.
The 34-year-old singer gets candid about her health, career and more in a new interview for her Billboard cover story, during which she reveals she was in bed for two years amid her Lyme disease battle. The Grammy nominee was on tour in 2014 when she started to feel fatigued and achy, which led her to ask,

“What the f–k is wrong with me?”

When the tour came to an end, one of Lavigne’s friends realized she might have Lyme disease. According to Billboard, she was encouraged to call Canadian music producer David Foster‘s then-wife Yolanda Hadid, who had also been battling Lyme disease. Hadid ended up giving Lavigne the contact information for a Lyme specialist.

Avril Lavigne, Billboard

David Needleman

 

“I was in bed for f–king two years,” Lavigne tells Billboard. “It’s a bug — a spirochete — so you take these antibiotics, and they start killing it.”

“But it’s a smart bug: It morphs into a cystic form, so you have to take other antibiotics at the same time,” Lavinge continues. “It went undiagnosed for so long that I was kind of f–ked.”

The Billboard interview also states that Lavigne was in bed with her mother one night during her battle, barely able to breathe, when she started to pray.

Avril Lavigne, Billboard

David Needleman

 

“I had accepted that I was dying,” she tells the outlet. “And I felt in that moment like I was underwater and drowning, and I was trying to come up to gasp for air. And literally under my breath, I was like, ‘God, help me keep my head above the water.'”

That became the inspiration for her song “Head Above Water,” which she released last month after about a five-year hiatus. The singer worked on the song with her ex, Chad Kroeger, who she calls “great” and who also worked on more songs with Lavigne for her upcoming album.

“The silver lining of it is that I’ve really had the time to be able to just be present, instead of being, like, a machine: studio, tour, studio, tour,” she says. “This is the first break I’ve ever taken since I was 15.”

To read more from Lavigne’s interview, pick up a copy of Billboard, on newsstands Friday.

Yolanda Hadid Reveals She’s ‘Not Feeling Good’ Again After ‘One Year of Remission’ From Lyme Disease

https://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/news/yolanda-hadid-im-not-feeling-good-again-after-brief-lyme-disease-remission/?platform=hootsuite

Yolanda Hadid Reveals She’s ‘Not Feeling Good’ Again After ‘One Year of Remission’ From Lyme Disease

The fight continues. Yolanda Hadid revealed during her speech at the Global Lyme Alliance Gala in New York City on Thursday, October 11, that she is struggling with her Lyme disease battle again after one year of remission.
lyme disease
Yolanda Hadid speaks onstage during the Global Lyme Alliance Fourth Annual New York City Gala. Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images

“What keeps me getting up every morning is my two children that also have had Lyme disease,” the 54-year-old began, referring to her model daughter Bella Hadid and son Anwar Hadid. (She is also mother of model Gigi Hadid). “Quite often, I just went to get on with my life and pretend the whole nightmare never happened. I got sick in 2000. We’re now in 2018. I had one year of remission.”

The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills alum then explained she is not quite “back where [she] started” with her illness, but she is also no longer “feeling good.”

“[I’m] just wanting to crawl in a hole and wait for it all to pass, but I also understand the higher purpose of my journey is to continue to bring awareness to this awful disease until the change is made,” Yolanda told the crowd, which included fellow Housewives Luann de Lesseps, Dorinda Medley, Sonja Morgan, Tinsley Mortimer and honored guest Ramona Singer

lyme disease
Ramona Singer, Luann de Lesseps, Tinsley Mortimer, Yolanda Hadid, and Dorinda Medley attend the Global Lyme Alliance Fourth Annual New York City Gala. Rob Kim/Getty Images

“What keeps me awake at night is not my journey the journey of my children and so many children in the world that don’t get the proper treatments that they deserve,” she continued. “Living in today’s world is hard enough as a healthy child. It’s time that we all put an end to this. If I die next week, next month, next year — this is the most, the greatest cause I have ever fought for.”

She concluded:

“Even today, I have been in treatment all day. I feel like s—t. I showed up because this has to change.”

Yolanda has been very vocal about her struggles with Lyme disease over the years, documenting her ups and downs on RHOBH for four seasons and telling her story in her 2017 memoir, Believe Me: My Battle with the Invisible Disability of Lyme Disease.

 

 

 

Study Finds Q Fever & Rickettsia (Typhus) in Australian Ticks and People

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/30270855/

Ixodes holocyclus Tick-Transmitted Human Pathogens in North-Eastern New South Wales, Australia.

Graves SR, et al. Trop Med Infect Dis. 2016.

Abstract

A group of 14 persons who live in an area of Australia endemic for the Australian paralysis tick, Ixodes holocyclus, and who were involved in regularly collecting and handling these ticks, was examined for antibodies to tick-transmitted bacterial pathogens.

Five (36%) had antibodies to Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever and three (21%) had antibodies to spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae (Rickettsia spp). None had antibodies to Ehrlichia, Anaplasma, Orientia, or Borrelia (Lymedisease) suggesting that they had not been exposed to these bacteria.

A total of 149 I. holocyclus ticks were examined for the citrate synthase (gltA) gene of the SFG rickettsiae and the com1 gene of C. burnetii; 23 (15.4%) ticks were positive for Rickettsia spp. and 8 (5.6%) positive for Coxiella spp. Sequencing of fragments of the gltA gene and the 17 kDa antigen gene from a selection of the ticks showed 99% and 100% homology, respectively, to Rickettsia australis, the bacterium causing Queenslandtick typhus.

Thus, it appears that persons bitten by I. holocyclus in NE NSW, Australia have an approximate one in six risk of being infected with R. australis. Risks of Q fever were also high in this region but this may have been due to exposure by aerosol from the environment rather than by tick bite. A subset of 74 I. holocyclus ticks were further examined for DNA from Borrelia spp., Anaplasma spp. and Ehrlichia spp. but none was positive. Some of these recognised human bacterial pathogens associated with ticks may not be present in this Australian tick species from northeastern New South Wales.

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**Comments**

Folks in Australia have been fighting the denial of authorities for decades regarding Lyme Disease:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/08/21/our-battle-ongoing-lyme-disease-in-australia/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/11/03/ld-not-in-australia-here-we-go-again/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/10/03/aussie-widow-of-lyme-disease-victim-to-sue-nsw-health/  A SYDNEY woman launches a class action against NSW Health after autopsy results showed her husband was riddled with Lyme in his liver, heart, kidney, and lungs.  He was only 44 years old and was bitten by a tick while filming a TV show in Sydney.

Now how in the world did that happen?

While they still deny Lyme (borrelia) this recent study definitively shows a number of pathogens in Australian ticks and humans including Rickettsia (more commonly known as Tick & arthropod TyphusQueensland typhus or Rickettsia australis), as well as Q Fever.

Tick Typhus is similar to Rocky Mountain spotted fever, but deemed not as severe.  Symptoms include:

  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Malaise
  • Bloodshot eyes
  • Red lump at tick bite site
  • Ulceration at tick bite site
  • Black scab at tick bite site
  • Enlarged local lymph nodes
  • Forearm red rash
  • Red body rash
  • Palm rash
  • Rash on soles of feet

Doxycycline is the front-line drug for typhus and broad-spectrum antibiotics aren’t helpful.

Fact sheet on typhus:  https://www.health.nsw.gov.au/Infectious/factsheets/Factsheets/typhus.PDF  The perps are typically lice, fleas, mites, and ticks.

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/08/19/monster-ticks-found-in-germany-threaten-europe-with-deadly-disease-crimean-congo-fever/  In this article, they found a tropical form of tick typhus in tropical ticks found in Germany. Typhus is making a comeback, particularly in the southern U.S. Migrating birds are transporting ticks as well as the diseases they carry worldwide 

Fact sheet on Q Fever: http://www.stopticks.org/ticks/qfever.asp

Caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii, it can cause pneumonia and hepatitis (liver inflammation) in its early stage, and infection of the heart valves (endocarditis) in its chronic stage.  Perps are the Brown Dog Tick (Rhipicephalus sanguine us), Rocky Mountain Wood Tick (Dermacentor andersoni), and the Lone Star Tick (Amblyomma americium).

https://coloradoticks.org/tick-borne-diseases/q-fever/  This article states it’s usually a mild disease with flu-like symptoms but sometimes it can resurface years later.  This more deadly, chronic form, of Q fever can damage heart, liver, brain and lungs. C. burnetii is highly infectious. Humans that are susceptible to this disease can be infected by a single organism. It is considered a significant threat for bio warfare and is classified as a Category B agent of bioterrorism.

The severity and combination of signs and symptoms vary greatly. About half the people infected with Q fever will get sick. Symptoms include:

  • High fever (up to 105°F)
  • Fatigue
  • Severe headache
  • General malaise
  • Myalgia
  • Chills or sweats
  • Non-productive cough
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Chest pain

Doxycycline is also the front-line drug for this with quinolone antibiotics as an alternative.

Add the Ixodes holocyclus tick to this list as well.

And before you think it can only ever be in Australia, this article in the 2013 issue of the Australian Veterinary Journal shows the likelihood of a population of Ixodes holocyclus breeding outside their common range.  https://conference.ava.com.au/13097.

Well there goes the neighborhood.

Here’s a nifty chart:  https://www.lymedisease.org/lyme-basics/co-infections/other-co-infections/ (Please remember this is constantly changing)

Screen-Shot-2014-08-26-at-5.27.54-PM

If there’s one think I know for sure, it’s that nothing about ticks and the diseases they carry is sure.

They are finding tropical ticks in Germany (where they shouldn’t be) https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/08/19/monster-ticks-found-in-germany-threaten-europe-with-deadly-disease-crimean-congo-fever/ and they are finding Asian ticks in the U.S. (where they shouldn’t be) https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/10/03/1st-person-bitten-by-east-asian-longhorned-tick/.

When is the CDC going to get the memo and scrap the tick maps?