Archive for the ‘Supplements’ Category

Melatonin Miracle

https://www.betterhealthguy.com/episode151

Why You Should Listen

In this episode, you will learn about the miracle molecule know as melatonin.

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About My Guest

My guest for this episode is Dr. John Lieurance.  John Lieurance, ND, DC is a naturopathic and chiropractic neurologist who has been in private practice for over 27 years.  He directs Advanced Rejuvenation, a multi-disciplinary clinic, with a focus on alternative and regenerative medicine, naturopathic medicine, functional neurology, functional cranial release, Lumomed, Lyme disease, mold illness, and many other neurological conditions such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, degenerative neurological disease, and inner ear conditions. He travels internationally teaching other doctors about the benefits of melatonin and various protocols using melatonin as well as other modalities.  Dr. Lieurance founded UltimateCellularReset.com, a web based educational portal, which sends out weekly videos on health and wellness tools for overcoming disease and fostering longevity and vitality.  He has been featured in many podcasts and documentaries.

Key Takeaways

  • What is melatonin?
  • Where is it produced in the body?
  • What properties does melatonin have that go beyond sleep support?
  • How might melatonin help the body to mitigate stress?
  • Can melatonin help with autonomic nervous system balance?
  • Does melatonin support the mitochondria and production of ATP?
  • Does melatonin support the brain’s ability to detoxify and minimize neurodegenerative conditions?
  • Can melatonin support autophagy and balance mTOR/autophagy?
  • Might melatonin have a role in dealing with chronic infections?
  • How might melatonin support detoxification of heavy metals?
  • Does melatonin help to balance the immune system?
  • Is melatonin a reasonable tool to consider in those with autoimmune conditions?
  • How important is it to decalcify the pineal gland?
  • How might melatonin be helpful in those with SIBO?
  • What forms of melatonin work best?
  • What is high-dose melatonin?

Connect With My Guest

https://MelatoninBook.com
Use code BETTERHEALTH to get your free PDF version of the book

Related Resources

MitoZen
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Interview Date

August 24, 2021

Transcript

Transcript Disclaimer: Transcripts are intended to provide optimized access to information contained in the podcast.  They are not a full replacement for the discussion.  Timestamps are provided to facilitate finding portions of the conversation.  Errors and omissions may be present as the transcript is not created by someone familiar with the topics being discussed.  Please Contact Me with any corrections. 

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How Much Melatonin Should I Take?

Aug. 27, 2021

How much melatonin should I take for sleep? Dr. Bill Rawls explains why most people take the wrong dose and type of melatonin and how that can backfire and disrupt sleep, plus he shares just how much melatonin to take and when to help you fall and stay asleep. Learn more about natural sleep aids here: https://vitalplan.com/blog/natural-sl… 

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Why the FDA is Attacking NAC Supplements – TAKE ACTION

https://anh-usa.org/why-the-fda-is-attacking-nac-supplements/

Why the FDA is Attacking NAC Supplements?

JULY 15, 2021

N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) has been on the market as a supplement for decades—why is the FDA attacking it now? Action Alert!

A few weeks ago, we told you about the FDA’s recent actions threatening NAC supplements—products which the FDA has allowed on the market for decades. The question is, why now, after all these years, is the FDA doing this? Digging a bit deeper, it seems obvious that the FDA is clearing the market of affordable NAC supplements in an effort to eliminate competition for NAC drugs that could be coming to market in the next few years. If our suspicions are correct, this would be another outrageous example of the FDA doing Big Pharma’s dirty work. We cannot let it happen.

To briefly recap how we got here: In a slew of warning letters sent last year, the FDA targeted a number of supplement companies marketing “unapproved” cures for hangovers—which the agency absurdly considers to be a “disease.” Some of these products contain NAC. In the letters to those companies, the FDA states that NAC does not meet the legal definition of a supplement because it was approved as a drug in 1963; according to federal law, any substance approved as a drug before it was sold as a supplement cannot be sold as a supplement. All of this means that the status of NAC as a supplement is currently in dispute.

So, why is the FDA threatening NAC now, during a pandemic when a new FDA commissioner hasn’t even been appointed? For starters, a drug company is investigating NAC as a treatment for a rare genetic disorder that damages the myelin sheath, which insulates nerve cells in the brain. The Phase 1 trial was completed in March 2020.

But that’s just the beginning. A search through the government’s clinical trials database shows considerable interest from the pharmaceutical industry in NAC. There are 17 trials looking at NAC, in both drug and supplement form, in the treatment of COVID. Additionally, there are over 50 trials looking at NAC for a variety of other conditions, including: autism spectrum disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, alcohol abuse disorder, rhinosinusitis, bronchiolitis, cardiac arrhythmia, and more.

Note that NAC drugs are currently available in generic form since it is off-patent, but a company could bring a new branded NAC drug to market if it was proven effective for an additional indication.

Given these facts, it seems reasonable to assume that the FDA is setting the stage for a new NAC drug to come to market by removing the competition from much cheaper NAC supplements. We called it when the FDA pulled a similar move a few years back when they went after brain health supplements, trying to clear the market for a new Alzheimer’s drug—culminating in the recent approval of an Alzheimer’s treatment that many experts think is not effective. CBD supplements may face a similar fate if Congress does not force the FDA’s hand by legalizing CBD in dietary supplements.

It is critically important to maintain access to affordable NAC supplements. In a recent interview with the Life Extension Foundation, Dr. Daniel Amen noted that NAC “has shown promising results in people with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, OCD, and addictions. It can also decrease inflammation and may help delay brain atrophy in Alzheimer’s disease.” NAC protects the body from toxins, is a selective immune system enhancer, and helps remove free radicals, which contribute to neurogenerative diseases and aging. In Europe, NAC is a prescription medicine used to reduce congestion.

NAC is also a precursor to glutathione, one of the body’s most important antioxidants. Glutathione plays crucial roles in nutrient metabolism and the regulation of many cellular events (such as gene expression, protein synthesis, cell proliferation, and more); glutathione deficiency contributes to oxidative stress, which is implicated in the development of many diseases: Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, liver disease, HIV, heart attack, cancer, stroke, and diabetes.

Note that acetaminophen depletes glutathione, so those who regularly take it should consider, in consultation with an integrative doctor, supplementing with NAC to replenish glutathione levels. In fact, NAC is routinely used in hospitals to counteract acetaminophen toxicity.

NAC is far too important to be threatened by the FDA, especially under such dubious circumstances.

Recently, the FDA announced that, by the end of June 2022, it plans to release drafts or final versions of a number of policies, and among them is the “new dietary ingredient” (NDI) guidance (“new supplement” guidance, in plain English).

It is no exaggeration to say that this is the most dangerous threat to supplements we’ve seen in decades. 

We must continue to vehemently oppose the guidance as currently written and demand that substantial changes are made before the final version is released. It is especially dangerous given that we are in a pandemic situation that is constantly evolving, with scientists warning of viral variants that evade vaccine-induced immunity.

Action Alert! Write to the FDA and tell them not to threaten NAC supplements. Please send your message immediately. 

Lyme Brain & Fibro Fog: Natural Solutions Webinar

https://rawlsmd.com/webinars/lyme-brain-fibro-fog/?

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Lyme Brain & Fibro Fog

Live Webinar with Dr. Bill Rawls

Wednesday, July 21st
8pm EDT

Webinar can be viewed on any device

The physical symptoms of chronic Lyme disease and fibromyalgia are challenging on their own. But when your mental capacities start to waver, it can take levels of frustration and fear to a whole new level.

Why are Lyme and fibromyalgia sufferers so prone to brain and neurological symptoms, and what can you do to find effective and lasting relief?

Join an updated live webinar with Dr. Bill Rawls, author of the best-selling book Unlocking Lyme, who knows firsthand what it’s like to live with Lyme brain and fibro fog. He’ll explain why Lyme disease and fibromyalgia tend to target the brain, and share insights on the best herbs and other natural lifestyle remedies for overcoming symptoms and reducing the risk and severity of long-term degenerative cognitive conditions such as dementia.

You’ll learn exactly what you need to clear the fog and restore healthy cognitive and neurological function, so that you can get back to thinking and feeling like yourself again.

RESERVE MY SEAT »

In this webinar, Dr. Rawls will also discuss:

• Why cognitive symptoms like confusion, short-term memory loss, anxiety, anger, and depression are so common in chronic illness patients such as those with Lyme disease, fibromyalgia, and Long COVID.

• How microbes, inflammation, and immune dysfunction disrupt cognitive function

• The best herbs and natural remedies for restoring and protecting brain health

• Numerous insights during the live Q&A with Dr. Rawls

About Dr. Bill Rawls

Bill Rawls, M.D., is a physician and leading expert in Lyme disease, integrative health, and herbal medicine. In the middle of his successful medical career, Dr. Rawls’ life was interrupted by Lyme disease. In his journey to overcome it, he explored nearly every treatment possible – from conventional medicine to a range of alternative therapies. In the more than 12 years since his recovery, Dr. Rawls has helped thousands of patients find their path to healing from Lyme disease and chronic illness. He is the author of the best-selling book Unlocking Lyme, and the Medical Director of RawlsMD.com and Vital Plan, an online holistic health company and Certified B Corporation®.

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What Helps Improve Cognitive Function for Lyme Patients?

https://www.globallymealliance.org/blog/what-helps-improve-cognitive-function-for-lyme-patients

When Lyme disease bacteria (spirochetes) cross the blood-brain barrier, they can cause myriad neurological impairments and nervous system inflammation. Neurological Lyme disease can manifest as brain fog, memory loss, word and song iteration, confusion, anxiety and depression, sleep disturbancesand more. “Lyme brain” is terribly frustrating for patients who could once multitask, but now lose their train of thought mid-sentence, or can’t find their way to the store. Many have written to me to ask what helped me improve cognitive function. Here’s what helped the most:

  • Pharmaceutical treatment: Lyme is a bacterial infection, and you can’t improve cognitive function without killing the bacteria that’s causing it. Sometimes symptoms can get worse as bacteria die off faster than your body can eliminate them (a Herxheimer reaction), but in my experience, the payoff is worth the temporary increase in discomfort and decrease in capabilities. Your doctor may want you to pulse antibiotics in order to give your body time to recover. There are particular antibiotics that work best to penetrate the blood-brain barrier and improve cognitive symptoms. Because every single case of tick-borne illness is unique, there is no set protocol, but your Lyme Literate Medical Doctor (LLMD) can tailor one to your needs.
  • Supplements: Certain supplements can help reduce inflammation and neurotoxins. Glutathione and Essential Fatty Acids are two that are commonly used (but again, I can’t give specific medical advice; you need to check with your LLMD about which supplements, and what dosage, would be appropriate for you). I’m wary of doctors who sell supplements themselves (you want to make sure your health, not their financial gain, is their top priority). Though supplements may seem good because they’re “natural,” they can have side effects and contraindications, so don’t always assume that natural is better. For me, I’ve needed a combination of both pharmaceutical treatment and supplements to improve all of my symptoms of Lyme disease, babesiosis, and ehrlichiosis.
  • Rest: Your body needs adequate sleep to heal. This can be really hard to come by for Lyme patients, and it also can be aggravating and downright boring to be in bed all the time. But your body is working really hard to fight infection, and it needs all the rest it can get in order to do so. Even now, a decade into remission, I still can get neurologically overstimulated and experience a flare-up of cognitive symptoms. When that happens, I need to wind down, give myself some quiet time, and get extra sleep.
  • Anti-inflammatory foods: In my post “The Lyme Diet,” I discuss foods that help with reducing inflammation. There are good foods to avoid, like gluten and processed sugar, and good foods to include, like fruits, vegetables, and proteins. Certain foods have antioxidant properties. Whether eating them has helped my cognitive function, I can’t say for sure, but I know it hasn’t hurt, and I’ll take any excuse to have a piece of dark chocolate!
  • Pacing: It can be enticing to keep reading a book that you’re really into, or to binge watch a show, but doing either can be taxing on a Lyme-riddled brain. Often, I don’t know I’m overstimulated until it’s too late. I feel fine reading one page, and then another, and then all of a sudden, my head feels like it’s full of molasses. I’ve learned to stop while I’m ahead. You might tell yourself, “I have to stop reading after two pages, even if I feel fine, and rest for twenty minutes.” Eventually, as your infections get better, you’ll be able to do more, but you have to think of improving cognitive function as a marathon, not a sprint.
  • Making lists: Because memory can be so impacted by tick-borne illness, it can help to make to-do lists for each day. You can literally write down tasks like “shower” and “eat lunch,” and check them off when you’ve done them (it’s especially helpful to set reminders, either in writing or on your phone, to take your medications). Write out only what you can handle for one day at a time, and put other items on lists for later in the week. Remember to include self-care items, too, like “rest” or “take a bath.”
  • Neurofeedback: This non-invasive brain training program helps your brain to work optimally (the system I use is called Neuroptimal). I use it to help quiet my brain down; others use it to sharpen their thinking. The process uses your brain’s own information to figure out what it needs. It’s a relaxing process that involves watching kaleidoscope images on a screen (you can close your eyes if those feel overstimulating) and listening to gentle music while sensors are attached to your head. You’ll hear occasional skips in the music, which are signals that help your brain get back to its optimal state. Neuroptimal is great because it works on the whole brain at once. The neurofeedback practitioners I’ve worked with have cautioned against doing neurofeedback that only works on one section of the brain at once, saying this can actually worsen Lyme brain. I first got connected with my practitioner through a sleep clinic (which meant that sessions were covered by insurance). Your LLMD may want to do a sleep study, or refer you to a practitioner; you can also find one through the Neuroptimal site.
  • Body work/cranial sacral massage: I do a type of hands-on therapy called Integrative Manual Therapy, which encompasses cranial sacral therapy and neurofascial processing. This gentle, light touch helps lymphatic drainage, and often calms my limbic system Easing these symptoms reduces my brain fog, allowing for better cognitive function. Some physical therapists offer this type of therapy (which again means that insurance can cover it).
  • Play word and memory games: To help sharpen my brain (and keep me busy), a friend used to play writing games with me over email. He’d set rules such as, “Tell a story about a dog using only three syllable words” or “Tell me the name of someone we went to school with, and then come up with another using the first letter of that person’s last name.” I think these games helped improve my memory. It was nice to do them over email because I could take as long as I needed to complete them.
  • Recall the music or games of healthier times: Memory care units for the elderly sometimes use music therapy to help prompt long-term memory. People struggling with short-term memory are often able to recall and sing entire songs from their youth. In the midst of convalescence, I played an old card game, “Scrooge.” This elaborate version of double solitaire requires memory, quick thinking, and strategy. These were not functions that I could generally execute well in those darkest days of illness, but while playing that card game, I suddenly could. When I won handily, my opponent quipped, “There’s nothing wrong with that brain of yours!”
  • Limit stimulation: I quickly learned that loud noises, crowded rooms, and flashing screens would stimulate my brain to the point of shut down, and then brain fog would settle in. By limiting the amount of time I spent on screens, and avoiding particularly fast-paced shows, I was able to keep my brain calm so I could engage in other activities like writing and reading.
  • Accept that there will be setbacks: Healing from tick-borne illness is not linear. You will regain some cognitive function, and then have periods of brain fog, and then start improving again. Eventually, if you follow your doctor’s protocol and stick to some of these tips, you should start to see more good days than bad. I still sometimes struggle with cognitive issues, but they are slight now. When I was at my sickest, I couldn’t read or watch TV. I mixed up my words. My head ached. Now, I can write, teach, read and watch TV in short segments, and generally carry on with good cognitive functioning, so long as I work to maintain my health.
Writer

Jennifer Crystal

Writer

Opinions expressed by contributors are their own. Jennifer Crystal is a writer and educator in Boston. Her memoir about her medical journey is forthcoming. Contact her using her email.

Email: lymewarriorjennifercrystal@gmail.com

Clinical Considerations of Clostridia Bacterial Concerns

https://biocidin.wistia.com/medias/wxusy0cfns Go here for presentation (Approx 22 Min)

Part 1: Clinical Considerations of Clostridia Bacterial Concerns – Pathogenicity Mechanisms

Biocidin Education Series

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