An oft quoted dogma currently exists that states you can not get infected with Lyme or the various coinfections that typically come with it if you get the tick off within a window of  24-48 hours.

FALSE!

Transmission Time:  Only one study done on Mice. At 24 hours every tick had transmitted borrelia to the mice; however, animal studies have proven that transmission can occur in under 16 hours and it occurs frequently in under 24 hours.  No human studies have been done and https://www.dovepress.com/lyme-borreliosis-a-review-of-data-on-transmission-time-after-tick-atta-peer-reviewed-article-IJGM  no studies have determined the minimum time it takes for transmission.

There’s also the issue of partially fed ticks transmitting more quickly:  http://iai.asm.org/content/61/6/2396.full.pdf  Ticks can spontaneously detach – and the authors of this study found that they did so 15% of the time in mice.  They also state that about a tenth of questing nymphs appear distended with partially fed sub-adult ticks being common.  This quicker transmission is due to spirochetes presiding in the salivary glands rather than the mid-gut.

It’s important to note that ticks typically carry more than just borrelia and transmission times have not been studied for many of these pathogens. https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/05/01/co-infection-of-ticks-the-rule-rather-than-the-exception/ and https://www.lymedisease.org/lyme-basics/co-infections/about-co-infections/  Transmission with more than one pathogen is associated with more severe illness and renders antibiotics less effective.  The longer a tick is attached the greater the risk of transmission.  Tick Borne Viruses can be transmitted in minutes.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4278789/

In the following video microbiologist Holly Ahern explains how the 24-48 window myth has been inappropriately used and is keeping people from getting diagnosed and treated.

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.wordpress.com/2016/12/07/igenex-presentation/?preview_id=8629&preview_nonce=3e6f36580f&post_format=standard&preview=true   Bob Giguere of IGeneX states a case of a little girl who went outside to play about 8:30a.m. and came inside at 10:30 with an attached tick above her right eye. By 2 o’clock, she had developed the facial palsy. At the hospital she was told it couldn’t be Lyme as the tick hadn’t been attached long enough. They offered a neuro-consult…..

By 4pm she couldn’t walk or talk.

A Lyme literate doctor trained by ILADS met the family in his office on a Saturday, gave her an intramuscular injection of antibiotics and within 2 hours the palsy was gone. He continued her treatment for approximately 4 weeks.