A Bug for Alzheimer’s?

https://aeon.co/essays/how-microbial-infections-might-cause-alzheimers-disease

Please read the article above, written by Melinda Wenner Moyer, edited by Pam Weintraub.

A brief summary:

Robert Moir, a neurologist at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, believes that beta-amyloid, a key player in Alzheimer’s, might be a good guy who is actually protecting the brain from pathogens.

This idea is coming from numerous corners of the world and has been labeled ‘pathogen hypothesis.’ Others pointing this out are pathologist Alan MacDonald, neuropathologist Judith Miklossy, and microbiologist Tom Grier.

Moir has published mouse studies showing that their brains create amyloid plaques within hours of contracting infections and they actually kill pathogens.

This observation flies in the face of accepted dogma about beta-amyloid and it is rarely discussed in AD groups.

A meta-analysis of 25 published studies has shown that infected folks are 10 times more likely to develop AD, leading international researchers to co-sign an editorial begging others to consider pathogens in relation to AD.

But, the cabal isn’t having it. Moir’s 2016 paper was rejected six times without even a review before finally getting the nod.  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/01/13/lyme-science-owned-by-good-ol-boys/

The author reminds the reader that infections in the brain are nothing new and a short list of them includes: Syphillis, Herpes simplex encephalitis, tick borne disease, HIV, Toxoplasma gondii, Chlamydia pneumoniae, HSV-1, and Zika.

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/04/10/bugs-causing-alzheimers/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/06/03/borrelia-hiding-in-worms-causing-chronic-brain-diseases/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/08/09/dr-paul-duray-research-fellowship-foundation-some-great-research-being-done-on-lyme-disease/

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-michael-conner/man-diagnosed-with-als-di_b_8891262.html

The journalist also points out that pathogen causation is not proven and that Alzheimer’s patients might be prone to infection but that some studies suggest the infections came first. She also says that the majority of folks suggesting the ‘pathogen hypothesis’ do not feel the infections work alone but rather can cause a domino effect that over time can accumulate causing AD.

And lastly, if beta-amyloid causes AD then removing these plaques should get rid of symptoms, but when 145 beta-amyloid-reducing drugs were tested, not one slowed progression of the disease.

Once again, proving a science cabal exists, Moir recounts how at a Korean conference, attendees were asked to raised hands if they thought infections played a part in AD and a majority of hands went up.

“Ten years ago, it would have been four guys in a corner, all huddled together, not talking to anyone else, Moir says.

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2017/01/02/fake-science/

Isn’t that sad?