Archive for the ‘Lyme’ Category

Lyme & Sensory Overload

https://www.globallymealliance.org/blog/lyme-disease-and-sensory-overload

Lyme disease can result in sensory overloading, causing patients to develop a sensitivity to both light and sound.

A few years ago, some new friends invited me for a night out at what I thought was going to be a quiet restaurant. When I got to the establishment, though, I discovered it was a club with strobe lights and loud music. Wanting to be polite, I sat down at a table with the group and tried to make conversation. I lasted about five minutes before I needed to excuse myself.

Before I got sick with the tick-borne illnesses Lyme disease, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, and possible bartonella, I enjoyed nights out at clubs. I danced the night away to loud music. I never even noticed lighting. Now, the neurological effects of my illnesses cause sensory overload, with particular sensitivity to light and sound. Bright flashing lights, fast-moving images on a screen, or even fluorescent lighting in a store can make me want to turn away and close my eyes. Loud noises ranging from music to an action-packed movie make me quickly cover my ears or turn down the volume.

Doctors Explain the Science Behind These Lyme Symptoms

As Brian A. Fallon, MD and Jennifer Sotsky, MD explain in their book Conquering Lyme Disease: Science Bridges the Great Divide, “Lyme disease can affect the sensorium early and severely, and such effects, in some cases, persist beyond recovery from other symptoms.”[i] The disease can affect the sensorium via the infection itself and systemic immune effects, changes in neurotransmitter balance, and altered neural pathways, all impacting sensory processing. For some patients, this might mean sensitivity to extreme lights or sounds that can cause a flare of other neurological symptoms. Just a few minutes of overload can bring on a sense of my head feeling “full,” brain fog, or twitching and burning extremities. Drs. Fallon and Sotsky note, “Exposure to light may lead to headaches, eye pain, or even panic attacks. It can be very helpful to recognize that the feeling of extreme anxiety in certain settings is related to sensory issues rather than coming out of the blue or in reaction to interpersonal tension.”

For other patients, the sensitivity may come from more subtle light or sound exposure, things that other people might not notice but that can send the Lyme patient’s nervous system into overdrive. I know one patient who felt like she was listening to loud music if someone merely whispered on the other side of the room. Repetitive noises, like a ticking clock, can be especially grating. “Most of us take for granted that our senses provide us with a more or less accurate representation of the external world,” write Drs. Fallon and Sotsky. “But when colors appear suddenly too intensely bright, or normal ambient sounds, rather than being soothing, grate against us like a rasp on metal or fingernails on a blackboard, then there is a brutal awakening to the fact that we are, in our very essential being, at the mercy of our sensory apparatus.”

What Lyme Patients Can Do to Control These Symptoms

Because sensory overload may or may not improve with treatment as other symptoms do, patients need to learn to control external factors that can set this symptom off. For example, I have realized that I can handle watching a movie in the theater as long as I don’t sit too close to the screen, and as long I as wait in the lobby during previews, which tend to be particularly loud and flashy. I’ve gotten rid of ticking clocks from my home. I’ve turned off the “zoom” feature on my phone, so it doesn’t look like the apps are flying at me when I open the screen.

Making these lifestyle adjustments can be frustrating, especially if you’re someone who previously enjoyed big shows and now cannot. For me, the modifications are worth it to avoid neurological symptom flares. And while my sensory overload has not gone away, it has improved over time. When I was acutely ill, I couldn’t even watch a movie on a small screen at home. Loud voices were too much for me. My tolerance has improved, and now I can handle acoustic concerts and stores with fluorescent lights. And I don’t need a club scene to enjoy a night out with friends. I just need their company, which is more fun anyway when I don’t have to shout over loud music to talk to them

To read more GLA blogs, click here.

The above material is provided for information purposes only. The material (a) is not nor should be considered, or used as a substitute for, medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, nor (b) does it necessarily represent endorsement by or an official position of Global Lyme Alliance, Inc. or any of its directors, officers, advisors or volunteers. Advice on the testing, treatment or care of an individual patient should be obtained through consultation with a physician who has examined that patient or is familiar with that patient’s medical history. 

[i] Fallon, Brian A., MD and Sotsky, Jennifer, MD. Conquering Lyme Disease: Science Bridges the Great Divide. New York: Columbia University Press, 2018 (315).

Writer

Jennifer Crystal

Opinions expressed by contributors are their own. Jennifer Crystal is a writer and educator in Boston. Her work has appeared in local and national publications including Harvard Health Publishing and The Boston Globe. As a GLA columnist for over six years, her work on GLA.org has received mention in publications such as The New Yorker, weatherchannel.com, CQ Researcher, and ProHealth.com. Jennifer is a patient advocate who has dealt with chronic illness, including Lyme and other tick-borne infections. Her memoir about her medical journey is forthcoming. Contact her via email below.

Email: lymewarriorjennifercrystal@gmail.com

For more:

Podcast: Australian Lyme Crimes: The Global Disgrace

https://soundcloud.com/kated-294710598/julie-mellae/s-EQ9LSDTFyk6?  Go Here for Podcast  (Approx. 11 Min)

Julie Mellae, author of “Australian Lyme Crimes, The global Disgrace,” gives an enlightening podcast on Lyme disease, particularly in Australia.  Points covered:

  • Lyme disease was initially a mysterious rheumatoid type of disease discovered in 1976 in a cluster of children in Lyme, Connecticut, USA hence its name
  • Now known to be harmful to humans, this disease can be transmitted human to human
  • Estimated Lyme patients worldwide could be over one million, the numbers rising
  • The following story covers my personal battle with Lyme disease and the history of the collaboration of Australia, America and Russia in their modus operandi of biological warfare
  • In this book, we look at Lyme disease’s origins, and the reasoning behind its denial and negligence by Australian doctors sworn to the Hippocratic Oath
  • We depict the actions and role of three main protagonists:
    • Willy Burgdorfer who discovered the causative spirochete of Lyme disease which was named after him
    • Dr Erich Traub, a Nazi scientist who was saved by the Americans, from a litany of war crime charges, due to his knowledge of viruses and diseases in Germany and Europe
    • Dr Allen Steere, who named the condition, dodged the Draft and omitted vital evidence from his scientific papers to deny Lyme disease credibility
  • We look at the action of governments and their various instrumentalities, which on the one hand seek to exploit sections of their own populations while at the same time resorting to manipulating decisions and laws for their own self -protection. It is the sickening story of lust for power, the fear of losing it, and the might agencies will bring to bear against the people who threaten these ambitions
  • This is not hyperbole on the part of the author. At the time of writing this, we have all become aware that biological warfare is a fact that can no longer be hidden as it once was.The highly mutating virus COVID 19 has practically brought the world to its knees, and we must assume it was ‘released from the lab’ in Wuhan, China. Dr Francis Boyle, an expert in bio-warfare, recently said: ‘the Coronavirus that we are dealing with here is an offensive biological warfare weapon. There have been previous reports of problems with the Wuhan Institute of Virology and ‘things’ leaking out of it’
  • The Salisbury Poisonings series on television during the COVID 19 lockdown acquainted a broad global audience the horrendous properties of Novichok (nerve agent) and its terrible effects on people who come into contact with it. And, there has been yet another targeted attack on a Russian citizen who is a long-standing vocal critic of Vladimir Putin
  • In Australia, we have seen the effects of Thalidomide, the British Nuclear testing in Maralinga and the ramifications and destructiveness it has wrought on families. We witnessed Australia’s appalling response to HIV Aids in 1980.  Our government is guilty of many sins to humanity.  And yet, the intransigence of political parties remains. Admit nothing. Do not own any responsibility. Dismiss, denigrate, destroy if necessary, those who challenge the status quo
  • This is my story and that of others who dispute the claim that ‘Lyme Disease does not exist in Australia’. Alongside the history of Lyme will be the history of the strategies used against those patients and researchers who are fighting to claw back the right to decent medical care.  Indeed, that is not such a big ask.  Then why is it?

‘In the fullness of time, the mainstream handling of chronic Lyme disease will be viewed as one of the most shameful episodes in the history of medicine because elements of the government and virtually the entire insurance industry have colluded to deny the disease.’ Dr Kenneth Leigner, Lyme Patient Human Rights defender

For more:

25 Specialists for 3 Infections: The Realities of Tick-Borne Disease

https://www.globallymealliance.org/blog/devin-wethauser?

Devin Wethauser shares her story of fighting Lyme disease, Bartonella, and Babesia in an effort to spread awareness.

It all started with the most intense stomach ache I’ve ever had, six days before my sixteenth birthday. That was the beginning of a journey I had never imagined would become my life. My symptoms were random and involved every part of my body, which sent me to over 25 different specialists. In my senior year of college, while under the care of an integrative medicine doctor, my diagnosis of Lyme, Bartonellosis and Babesiosis was confirmed.

thumbnail_image0I have had almost every symptom in the book, but specifically for Bartonella, I have had and continue to endure headaches, pain behind the eyes, muscle pain, poor appetite, swollen glands, horrible fatigue, random fevers, tachycardia, exacerbation of anxiety and depression, and severe brain fog.

Under the care of my LLMD, I have experimented with so many treatments, which unfortunately for me, have yet to help my conditions. These treatments have included the typical ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, doxycycline, herbals, low dose immunotherapy, and disulfiram. I am now on a combination of dapsone, rifampin, and doxycycline.

I have also developed some difficult mental health issues that made me seek out therapy. This experience, in particular, gave me purpose in my life. I realized that being a therapist, specifically for chronically ill people, is how I take the best of me and my experiences to help others.

The disease has completely changed my life. Since I’ve been sick for over a decade, I don’t remember what it’s like to feel healthy and pain free. I learned that the path I had originally carved out for me was no longer available. I’m not able to work full time as I don’t have the energy to do so. I have also developed some difficult mental health issues that made me seek out therapy. This experience, in particular, gave me purpose in my life. I realized that being a therapist, specifically for chronically ill people, is how I take the best of me and my experiences to help others. I graduated with an undergraduate degree in entrepreneurship thinking I’ll be starting a fashion business. However, now I’m currently working on my graduate degree to become a licensed professional clinical counselor and a licensed drug and alcohol counselor.

Screen Shot 2022-08-16 at 3-05-16 PMThe advice I’d share with others is that you must recognize every single person diagnosed with tick-borne infections is going to have a completely different journey. One person will be in remission from doxy while another (me) has yet to get there after trying countless treatments. At times, hope can be fleeting, but it’s important to hang on to that small sliver. I also think it’s extremely important to seek out therapy to process, build perspective and develop tools. Having these illnesses and diseases causes grief and trauma. Using professional help to navigate all this was critical for my journey.

In addition, you will have many non-believers, including those in the medical profession. I recently went to the emergency room for low oxygen saturation. The ER doctor said “you’re too young to be on all of these medications. What kind of treatment is this for LYMES disease? I’m going to cure you tonight.” This is a perfect example of why we need GLA and other organizations to fund research for better treatments. Once there’s a better treatment that LLMD’s can use and prove it works, then we can start educating ignorant doctors like the ER doctor in my story.

To read more blogs, click here.

The above material is provided for information purposes only. The material (a) is not nor should be considered, or used as a substitute for, medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, nor (b) does it necessarily represent endorsement by or an official position of Global Lyme Alliance, Inc. or any of its directors, officers, advisors or volunteers. Advice on the testing, treatment or care of an individual patient should be obtained through consultation with a physician who has examined that patient or is familiar with that patient’s medical history. 
GLA Contributor

Devin Wethauser

GLA Contributor

*Opinions expressed by contributors are their own. Devin is currently working as a personal stylist and shopper as she’s completing her Master’s Degree in Counseling and Psychology. In her free time, she binge-watches The Office or Seinfeld, goes fishing, or cuddles with her two Rottweilers named Mack and Biggie.

Email: dwville@gmail.com

Lyme Disease Causes Mix of Symptoms, Including Autonomic Dysfunction

https://danielcameronmd.com/lyme-disease-causes-mix-of-symptoms-including-autonomic-dysfunction/

LYME DISEASE CAUSES MIX OF SYMPTOMS, INCLUDING AUTONOMIC DYSFUNCTION

lyme-disease-mix-symptoms

In the case report “A Patient with SIADH, Urinary Retention, Constipation, and Bell’s Palsy following a Tick Bite,” Leone and colleagues describe a patient who developed an unusual combination of Lyme disease symptoms, all of which resolved following treatment. [1]

By Dr. Daniel Cameron

“Our case emphasizes that Lyme disease is capable of causing a mix of symptoms, which may be difficult to interpret, leading to a delay in diagnosis,” the authors write. And these symptoms may “develop consecutively further obscuring the clinical picture.”

A 69-year-old male presented to the hospital with abdominal pain and hyponatremia, a condition that occurs when the level of sodium in the blood is too low.

Four weeks earlier the man noticed a rash on his elbow, which resolved after one week. He also developed a decreased appetite, anorexia, abdominal fullness, chills, headache, fatigue, and myalgias and complained of having an acute onset of constipation.

“There should be a high alert of atypical presentation of this common tick bite associated infection,” the authors write.

Testing for Lyme disease was positive, and the patient began treatment with IV ceftriaxone.

Several days later, he developed Bell’s palsy, along with urinary retention, which required catheterization.

“Our case highlights the importance of including neurological Lyme disease as a possible diagnosis in individuals who present with symptoms of autonomic dysregulation….”

Two days after antibiotic treatment was initiated, the patient developed symptoms believed to be due to a Herxheimer reaction. The authors write, “the patient was found to be tachycardic, weak, diaphoretic, and febrile.”

Test results “suggested that Lyme carditis and NSTEMI were unlikely, and that these symptoms could be a Jarisch–Herxheimer reaction.” He was then switched to IV doxycycline.

At his 3-month follow-up appointment, the man’s symptoms had resolved completely.

“In our patient, an extremely rare mix of symptoms including SIADH, urinary retention, and constipation together with facial neuritis was observed.”

SIADH also known as syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion is a condition in which high levels of a hormone cause the body to retain water.

Authors conclude:

“Our case highlights the importance of including neurological Lyme disease as a possible diagnosis in individuals who present with symptoms of autonomic dysregulation such as hyponatremia due to an SIADH-like syndrome, urinary retention, anorexia, constipation, and facial palsy.”

References:
  1. Leone M, Iqbal A, Hugo Bonatti JR, Anwar S, Feaga C. A Patient with SIADH, Urinary Retention, Constipation, and Bell’s Palsy following a Tick Bite. Case Rep Nephrol. 2022 Jul 11;2022:5937131. doi: 10.1155/2022/5937131. PMID: 35859789; PMCID: PMC9293531.

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For more:

Gallic Acid for Lyme Study

https://www.mdpi.com/1422-0067/23/19/10987

Inhibition of Borrelia Burgdorferi-Induced TLR2-NFκB Canonical Signaling by Gallic Acid through Targeting the CD14+ Adaptor Protein and p65 Molecule

Department of Infectious Diseases, Dr. Rath Research Institute, San Jose, CA 95138, USA
*Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Natália Cruz-Martins
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 202223(19), 10987; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms231910987
Received: 29 August 2022 / Revised: 12 September 2022 / Accepted: 14 September 2022 / Published: 20 September 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Mechanisms of Anti-inflammatory Phytochemicals 2.0)
The cases of Lyme disease caused by Borrelia burgdorferi infection have been increasing throughout Northern America and Europe. This pathogen, if not treated in a timely manner with antibiotics, can cause persisting and debilitating health outcomes. In the search for novel agents against B. burgdorferi, we investigated a phenolic compound—gallic acid—for its anti-Borrelia and anti-inflammatory effects. Our results showed its biocidal effect starting from 100 μg/mL against active spirochetes, persisters/round-shaped bodies, and biofilm like aggregates of B. burgdorferi sensu stricto. Activation of macrophages by live B. burgdorferi also resulted in a robust NFκB-dependent proinflammatory responses seen in increased production of cytokines. Using human CD14+ macrophages in vitro, we showed that CD14+ adaptor and phosphorylated p65 molecule are impeded at nonbiocidal and noncytotoxic concentrations of gallic acid, resulting in the inhibition of both expression and secretion of cytokines IL1β, IL6, and TNFα. Our findings demonstrate efficacy of gallic acid against B. burgdorferi and provide potential mechanistic insight into its TLR2/CD14+-NFκB mediated mode of action. Further studies on the potential of gallic acid as a safe and effective compound against Borrelia-caused infection are warranted. View Full-Text
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**Comment**
Gallic acid is an antioxidant and phenolic compound found in many foods including:
  • numerous fruits (strawberries, grapes, bananas, blueberries, apples, mangos, pomegranates, mulberries, guavas, blackcurrants, and avocados)
  • nuts: walnuts, cashews, hazelnuts
  • red wine
  • green tea

It’s been known that it may help modulate the immune system and act as a natural defense against microbial infections including foodborne pathogens like Campylobacter, Escherichia coliListeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus, and pseudomonas, as well as a bacteria found in your mouth called Streptococcus mutans.  It also appears to be anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, reduce oxidative stress and fat storage in the obese by improving insulin signaling, and neuroprotective.   Source

This recent study showed that Quercus infectoria gall (Aleppo Oak) and its active constituent, gallic acid, showed remarkable activity against vaginal pathogens: Candida spp., Gardnerella vaginalis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Trichomonas vaginalis and Lactobacillus acidophilus.  

The study mentions: The antimicrobial and anti-trichomonas activity of extract was more than gallic acid. It seems that ethanolic extract of Quercus infectoria gall could inhibit the growth of vaginal pathogens.

Regarding this specific small tree, galls form on young branches when gall wasps sting the tree and deposit their larvae causing a chemical reaction with resulting hard balls (galls) to be formed.  These galls contain the highest naturally occurring level of tannin, as well as a number of other compounds including about 2-4% of gallic and ellagic acid.  Once again showing the marvels of nature in producing things that help human health.