https://thecovidblog.com/2021/04/27/supreme-court-pfizer-moderna-et-al-may-own-your-genes-once-youre-injected-with-their-lab-created-mrna-dna/

Supreme Court: Pfizer, Moderna et al. may own your genes once you’re injected with their lab-created mRNA, DNA

TheCOVIDBlog.com
April 27, 2021

WASHINGTON, D.C. — This article is prefaced with a shout-out to the good Dr. Carrie Madej (maa-DAY).

She is one of thousands of doctors and scientists worldwide suddenly labeled “conspiracy theorists” and “disinformation” by mainstream and social media. They tell peer-reviewed truth about COVID-19 and experimental shots. Dr. Madej is still on Twitter and Facebook for now. She is also featured in a viral video warning people about experiment mRNA and viral vector shots.

Dr. Madej said in a recent interview with The New American:

“The Supreme Court ruled that if there is anything synthetic, not from nature, inside of our genome, then whoever owns the patent on those synthetic parts now owns part or all of you as a human. That means Bill and Melinda Gates et al., The Department of Defense, et al. can literally own a human being. If this synthetic code is taken up into your genome, by law, you could be owned overnight.”

All legitimate doctors and scientists welcome fact-checking and peer-review. Turns out Dr. Madej is onto something, and further affirms every reason not to volunteer for these experimental injections.  (See link for article)

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Important excerpt:

The case that provides the blueprint for pharmaceutical companies claiming ownership of your genes is Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, Inc., 569 U.S. 576 (2013). This case originated from a Utah-based company called Myriad Genetics.

The company isolated the location and sequence of naturally-occurring genes called BRCA1 and BRCA2. Mutations in these genes positively correlate with predispositions to breast and ovarian cancers. Myriad filed patents on these genes in 1994 and 1995, respectively. The patents gave Myriad exclusive rights to cancer genetic testing that isolated natural DNA strands and created synthetic complementary DNA (cDNA) that resembled the original isolated strands.

The USPTO granted both patents in 1998. At least 2,000 other human genes had been patented through 2010, according to the New York State Bar. But the Myriad patents hindered other scientists from doing research on naturally-occurring BRCA1 and BRCA2, and thus hindered breast and ovarian cancer testing by other companies.

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