https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33024565/

Detection of potentially pathogenic bacteria from Ixodes ricinus carried by pets in Tuscany, Italy

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Free PMC article

Abstract

Background: Ticks are vectors of disease-causing pathogens that pose a serious threat to animals and people. Dogs and cats are exposed to tick infestation in multiple ways and can easily transport infected ticks into domestic environments and potentially transfer them to people. Pet owners are at increased risk of picking up ticks from their pets and developing tickborne diseases. This study aims to detect the presence of pathogens of potential public health interest in ticks removed from cats and dogs in Tuscany, Italy.

Methods: The collected ticks were screened for the presence of protozoan (Theileria species and Babesia species) and bacterial (Rickettsia species, Anaplasma species, Ehrlichia species, Chlamydia species, Bartonella species and Coxiella burnetii) pathogens using PCR.

Results: PCR and sequencing analysis revealed that

  • 3% of the ticks were PCR-positive for the presence of Rickettsia helvetica DNA
  • 5 %of ticks were PCR-positive for Bartonella henselae DNA
  • 46% of ticks were PCR-positive for Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia abortus DNA
  • None of the examined ticks was PCR-positive for Theileria species, Babesia species, Anaplasma species, Ehrlichia canis or Coxiella burnetii DNA

Conclusion: The results of this preliminary study highlight the importance of monitoring companion animals as indicators to evaluate the health status of their owners. Preventive measures are necessary to limit the spread of zoonotic pathogens from companion animals to people within the home environment.

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**Comment**

Ixodes ricinus, aka the castor bean tick is considered a  European species of tick that can transmit the following:

Now, there is the potential of two strains of Chlamydia to be added the growing list, with nearly half of the ticks in the study carrying it.

What does this mean to patients?  Good question.  We may never know because researchers are too busy studying ‘climate change,’ to have time for such silly endeavors as uncovering the effects of polymicrobial illness on patients.

This isn’t the first time we’ve heard of ticks carrying chlamydia:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/10/07/chlamydia-like-organisms-found-in-ticks/

Here, researchers identify chlamydia along with other pathogens in Alzheimer’s:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/03/09/researchers-identify-herpes-1-chlamydia-pneumoniae-several-types-of-spirochaete-as-major-causes-of-alzheimers/

CHLAMYDIA IS BEST DEFINED FROM THE LATIN WORD: CLOAK. YEP. ANOTHER STEALTH PATHOGEN.

Great read on the types of chlamydia:  https://articles.mercola.com/chlamydia/types.aspx The first two are mentioned in the abstract:

  • Chlamydia trachomatis can be passed from one person to another via unprotected sexual intercourse. Pain English: this is a STD.
  • Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae), a nonsexually transmitted disease that infects the lungs and causes bacterial pneumonia.
  • Chlamydia psittaci is another chlamydia strain that can lead to a rare condition called psittacosis, aka “parrot fever.”

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/04/19/first-study-showing-borrelia-chlamydia-mixed-biofilms-in-infected-human-skin-tissues  Excerpt:

IN SUMMARY, OUR STUDY IS THE FIRST TO SHOW BORRELIACHLAMYDIA MIXED BIOFILMS IN INFECTED HUMAN SKIN TISSUES, WHICH RAISES THE QUESTIONS OF WHETHER THESE HUMAN PATHOGENS HAVE DEVELOPED A SYMBIOTIC RELATIONSHIP FOR THEIR MUTUAL SURVIVAL.

For more:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2020/03/19/are-current-tick-prevention-methods-for-dogs-working/  Great resources within link for tick prevention methods