https://www.foxnews.com/health/maine-resident-rare-tick-illness-powassan

Maine resident contracts rare tick-borne illness that can cause brain infections, death, state CDC says Fox

Madeline Farber is a Reporter for Fox News. You can follow her on Twitter @MaddieFarberUDK.News’ Alexandria Hein contributed to this report.

A Maine resident has been infected with a rare but typically severe tick-borne illness that can cause brain infections and meningitis and, in some cases, lead to death.

The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced in a Wednesday news release that the resident, who has not been identified, showed symptoms of human Powassan encephalitis disease — more commonly referred to as Powassan virus — in late June and was hospitalized. The state CDC did not say whether or not the resident recovered.

NEW JERSEY VETERAN TESTED POSITIVE FOR RARE TICK-BORNE VIRUS BEFORE DEATH, DAUGHTER SAYS

Powassan virus — which “belongs to a group of viruses that can cause infection of the brain (encephalitis) or the membranes around the brain and spinal cord (meningitis), per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention—  is typically spread to humans after they’re bitten by an infected woodchuck or deer tick. The federal agency says those who live or work near brushy or woody areas are more likely to be exposed to potentially infected ticks.

Most cases of Powassan virus — which was first discovered in Powassan, Ontario in 1958, according to the Maine CDC — have occurred in the northeast and Great Lakes areas of the U.S.

Those infected with the virus typically experience fever, headache, vomiting, weakness, confusion, seizures and memory loss, per the Maine CDC, which also noted: “long-term neurologic problems may occur.”

“Symptoms can begin anytime from one week to one month after the tick bite. There is no specific treatment, but people with severe Powassan virus illness often need to be hospitalized,” it added.

Patients typically need support breathing and to treat swelling around the brain, but there is no medicine to treat the virus, nor is there a vaccine to prevent it, and about 10 percent of cases result in death, according to the federal health agency.

Powassan virus is rare, with an average of seven cases reported cases each year in the U.S. In Maine, 11 cases of Powassan virus have occurred since 2000, state health officials said.

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**Comment**

Here we go again. Powassan ISN’T RARE.

http://www.coppelabs.com/blog/why-is-powassan-virus-infection-still-described-as-rare-and-mysterious/  Please read the following excerpt by Coppe Lab here in Wisconsin,

For the last two years, Coppe Laboratories has dedicated a significant amount of time and resources to dispelling the myth that infection with Powassan virus, a virus transmitted by tick bite, is rare. The Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) reports only 100 cases of Powassan virus infection in the United States in the last 10 years. Indeed, that statistic gives the illusion that Powassan infection is rare. However, did you know that the only infections reported to CDC are those that are life-threatening, particularly cases causing severe inflammation of the brain like the case reported in LiveScience? Coppe has published three new papers in the last year that clearly show Powassan virus infection is not rare are at all,and until testing for this virus is included as part of tick-borne disease screening panels infections will continue to be underreported. Coppe’s Powassan Guide, which can be downloaded from the website, summarizes the findings from both tick and human Powassan prevalence studies, as well as defining the patient populations that would benefit most from Powassan testing.

COPPE LABORATORIES OFFERS THE FIRST COMMERCIAL PANEL DESIGNED TO DETECT EXPOSURE TO POWASSAN VIRUS THROUGHOUT ALL STAGES OF INFECTION.

Powassan can be transmitted in 15 minutes, so all the comforting words by the CDC on the emphasis that transmission of Lyme takes anywhere from 24-72 hours falls flat regarding Powassan. Also, to my knowledge, no work has been done on transmission time when multiple pathogens are being transmitted concurrently, or what happens when a person perhaps gets bitten, obtains Powassan but doesn’t have symptoms, and then in the future gets another tick bite and perhaps gets Lyme with that one.

Does that second bite activate a latent virus infection with Powassan?

THESE QUESTIONS HAVE NEVER BEEN BROACHED BY THE CDC.

The virus can be worse in those with “other medical conditions.”

Nobody really has a clue what a concurrent infection with Powassan looks like, but I would label that another medical condition. What if someone has Powassan and Lyme?  Or, in my case, what if you have Lyme, Bartonella, Babesia, and then Powassan on top of that?

THIS IS THE FLY IN THE OINTMENT THAT CURRENT RESEARCH IS NOT ADDRESSING.

In this article Coppe Lab, right here in Wisconsin has uncovered some interesting findings:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/08/31/wi-coppe-lab-in-the-news/  A study completed in May, 2016 of 106 patients with suspected acute tick borne disease showed 10.4 % had Powassan.  Nearly 17% of the patients with positive Lyme results also tested positive for POWV exposure. The authors concluded,

“Infection with POWV may be underdiagnosed and may contribute to the persistent symptoms often associated with Lyme diseasediagnosis.”16

They postulate:

In both studies, the percentage of Lyme patients co-infected with POWV was about 17%, coinciding with the 10 – 20% of patients treated for Lyme that develop lingering symptoms attributed to post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome.

One thing’s for sure.  The CDC is not getting the memo because every single article I read on Powassan calls it “rare.”  
QUESTION TO PONDER:  HOW MANY HAVE TO DIE BEFORE SOMETHING IS NO LONGER RARE?

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/03/04/powassan-virus-on-the-up-tick/