https://www.britishacademyofsoundtherapy.com/musical-daily-allowance/?

The study in the link above asked 7581 people questions about music. The conclusion states:

There was a general agreement of dosage time across 3 of the 4 domains with 11 minutes being the most common amount of time it took for people to receive the therapeutic benefit from their self- selected music preferences. The only exception was the domain of happiness where the most common length of time for people to become happier after listening to their chosen music was reduced to 5 minutes, suggesting that happy music takes less time to take effect than other music. More studies would need to be undertaken to establish a ‘before’ and ‘after’ mood-state to support these findings. This study revealed many interesting elements of how people use music as medicine.

the-musical-prescription-infographic-BAST-2

For more:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/07/06/study-finds-listening-to-music-can-help-regulate-mood-during-a-stressful-situation/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/09/23/top-nine-tips-for-coping-with-social-anxiety/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/11/30/cope-with-depression-anxiety-when-you-have-lyme/

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2020/02/09/6-traits-to-look-for-in-a-therapist-when-you-have-chronic-lyme/

New article on “noise pollution”:  https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamiegold/2020/02/25/the-hidden-dangers-of-noise-pollution-at-home/#487060c67504  It’s pretty common for Lyme/MSIDS patients to have sound, smell, and touch sensitivities.