https://www.change.org/p/the-us-senate-calling-for-a-congressional-investigation-of-the-cdc-idsa-and-aldf/u/24149441?

Wormser’s waste of your taxpayer dollars!

FEB 10, 2019 — 

Yet another useless study out of New York Medical College funded by the US Centers for Disease Control. Please see the following letter of disgust sent to Wormser with carbon copy to the TBD Working Group, Assistant Secretary for Health and Mark Holodniy Editor-in-Chief, Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease.

——— Original Message ———-
From: CARL TUTTLE <runagain@comcast.net>
To: gwormser@nymc.edu, tickbornedisease@hhs.gov, brett.giroir@hhs.gov
Cc: (82 Undisclosed recipients)
Date: February 9, 2019 at 9:42 AM
Subject: Efficacy of a 14-day course of amoxicillin for patients with erythema migrans

ScienceDirect

Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease

Efficacy of a 14-day course of amoxicillin for patients with erythema migrans.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0732889318303304

Wormser GP1, Brady KC2, Cho MS2, Scavarda CA2, McKenna D2.

Excerpt:

“….findings provide additional evidence that a 14-day course of 500 mg amoxicillin given 3 times per day is highly effective therapy for patients with early Lyme disease.”

Feb 9, 2019

Division of Infectious Diseases,
New York Medical College,
Valhalla, NY 10595
Attn: Gary P. Wormser, MD

Dr. Wormser,

Once again, as previously stated in the email below; “Your fixation on the acute stage of disease [with bulls-eye rash] after early treatment has done nothing to advance our understanding of how Lyme disease disables its victim.”

Early treatment of strep throat prevents patients from advancing to rheumatic fever which as you know causes irreversible heart damage. If we focused on the acute stage of strep we would never have realized that missed early treatment caused serious life-altering/life-threatening health consequences.

Ignoring the late stage horribly disabled Lyme population which could total in the millions worldwide is the equivalent of denying the Holocaust.

I noticed that your manuscript did not include the following reference:

July 2017- In Vitro Susceptibility of the Relapsing-Fever Spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi to Antimicrobial Agents.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28674060

Excerpt:

“We were able to show that both B. miyamotoi strains and B. hermsii demonstrated greater susceptibility to doxycycline and azithromycin, equal susceptibility to ceftriaxone and proved to be resistant to amoxicillin in vitro as compared to the B. burgdorferi s.l. isolates.”

Your retirement Dr. Wormser is highly, highly anticipated.

Carl Tuttle

Lyme Endemic Hudson, NH

NOTE: Wormser’s study was funded directly from the US Centers for Disease Control

Funding: RO1 CK 000152 which appears to be an open checkbook for his junk science.  (Wasteful taxpayer spending)

Cc: Tick Borne Disease Working Group
Assistant Secretary for Health, ADM Brett P. Giroir, M.D.
Mark Holodniy Editor-in-Chief, Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease.

_________________________________________________________

Previous email sent to Wormser on Jan 4, 2019:
On January 4, 2019 at 10:48 AM CARL TUTTLE <runagain@comcast.net> wrote:

JAMAShapiro ED, Wormser GP. Lyme disease in 2018: what is new (and what is not).
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2696480

Jan 4, 2019

Division of Infectious Diseases,
New York Medical College,
Valhalla, NY 10595
Attn: Gary P. Wormser, MD

Dr. Wormser,

In reference to your response to my letter to the Editor published in the December 18th  issue of JAMA, it would appear that you and your coauthor Dr. Shapiro conveniently ignored my question highlighted below: 

Excerpt from my letter to the editor:

Controversies About Lyme Disease
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2718786

-Carl Tuttle

“It is well known that untreated streptococcal pharyngitis can progress to rheumatic fever, causing irreversible heart damage. Untreated syphilis leads to progressive disability and dementia, and untreated HIV infection progresses to AIDS with significant disability and death. What happens to the patient with Lyme disease who goes months, years or decades before diagnosis because of a false negative serological test?”

___________________________

Untreated Lyme is destroying lives, ending careers while leaving the patient in financial ruin as reported by the disabled Lyme community for the past three decades. The absence of a bulls-eye rash after tick bite allows patients to progress to severe neurological disease instead of obtaining a prompt diagnosis and early treatment.

I would like to call attention to the following quote taken from an interview with Professor Willy Burgdorfer, the discoverer of the Lyme disease spirochete:

“The controversy in Lyme disease research is a shameful affair. I say that because the whole thing is politically tainted. Money goes to people that have for the past thirty years produced the same thing. Nothing.”  – Willy Burgdorfer

Source: (Live interview)

Prof. Willy Burgdorfer Talks About Lyme Disease
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dCnrUmAPcOE

Your fixation on the acute stage of disease after early treatment Dr. Wormser has done nothing to advance our understanding of how Lyme disease disables its victim.

For example:

Subjective symptoms after treatment of early Lyme disease.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20102996

Gary Wormser, New York Medical College

(Financed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control)

RESULTS:

“At 12 months after enrollment, only 5 (2.2%) of 230 evaluable patients reported new or increased symptoms, and in none of the patients were these symptoms of sufficient severity to be functionally disabling”

_____________________________

Summary of Wormser’s study: Anyone experiencing symptoms after the one-size-fits-all treatment approach is just experiencing nothing more than the “aches and pains of daily living.”

So basically Wormser’s results are then assumed to apply to the entire patient population; in other words, Lyme is no big deal which has wrongly influenced our nation’s response to this serious life-altering health threat. The research into how Lyme disables should have been completed by now but the misclassification of Lyme as a simple nuisance disease (hard to catch and easily treated) has paralyzed the response to this runaway plague.

Many infections as I continue to point out evolve into an entirely different and serious life-altering/life-threatening disease when left untreated.

Post Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS) after early treatment and untreated Lyme of months, years or decades are two entirely different disease states; the latter being ignored for three decades. Patients who have had a prolonged exposure to the pathogen are almost always incapacitated.

Purposely avoiding the advanced stage of disease hides the horribly disabled and anyone unable to see this is somewhat naive.

So I ask the question Dr. Wormser, What is the motivation for downplaying the severity of Lyme disease while ignoring patient outcry for thirty years?

A prompt response to this inquiry is requested.

Please hit Reply-All as I have carbon copied the Tick Borne Disease Working Group and Assistant Secretary for Health, ADM Brett P. Giroir, M.D.

Carl Tuttle

Lyme Endemic Hudson, NH

___________________

Study found here:  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0732889318303304

Efficacy of a 14-day course of amoxicillin for patients with erythema migrans

Abstract

Although a 14-day treatment course with amoxicillin is in wide clinical usage to treat early Lyme disease, only a few published studies exist to validate its efficacy and safety, with none in the United States. In this study, we reviewed the records of 24 prospectively followed adult patients with erythema migrans who were prescribed a 14-day course of amoxicillin, 500 mg 3 times daily. Treatment with amoxicillin was well tolerated and uniformly successful in resolving the erythema migrans skin lesion and in preventing the development of an objective neurologic, cardiac, or rheumatologic manifestation. Although the study was relatively small and only involved a single center, the findings provide additional evidence that a 14-day course of 500 mg amoxicillin given 3 times per day is highly effective therapy for patients with early Lyme disease.

__________________

For appropriate treatment, see:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/02/13/lyme-disease-treatment/

For a fantastic overview listen to Dr. Burrascano on the history of Lyme, and important considerations in treatment:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/12/28/the-history-of-lyme-disease-dr-burrascano/  

In brief:

  • Treat ALL forms of Bb
  • Treat coinfections
  • Treat long enough (Bb is slow-growing and persistent)
  • Make sure blood levels of antibiotics are high enough as people vary.  He discusses amoxicillin and how they found that increasing the dosage to 1,000mg 3X/day and adding probenecid to increase the antibiotic in the blood, people did even better.  He goes on to tell of an unpublished study with Stoneybook where there was a failure rate of 100% of patients taking 300mg of doxycycline a day for 21 days. Yet, how many people are given this exact treatment?
  • Cycle treatment.  This means, once you are symptom-free for 2-4 months, stop treatment.  If symptoms return, treat again.  Burrascano has found that it typically takes 3-4 Cycles before a person remains symptom-free.  The 3rd cycle often yields the worst herx in his experience.

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/04/13/chronic-lyme-post-mortem-study-needed-to-end-the-lyme-wars/  In this astute editorial, Microbiologist Tom Greer states:

From the very beginning, treatment failures were seen in virtually every antibiotic study done. The longer the patient follow up, the higher the incidence of treatment failure. The medical community blamed early treatment failures on the older antibiotics erythromycin, tetracycline, and penicillin, and determined that these antibiotics were not very effective at curing Lyme disease. Ignored was the fact that the newer antibiotics were also consistently failing to prevent relapses of active infection. Since these early treatment studies, the concept that two weeks of antibiotic therapy is adequate treatment for Lyme disease has remained ingrained in the medical community’s collective consciousness. [The Long-Term Follow-up of Lyme Disease: A Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Study. Authors: Shadick NA; Phillips CB; Sangha O et al. Ann Intern Med 1999 Dec 21;131(12):919-26]

*Data presented by Dr. Nancy Shadick at an International Lyme Symposia showed that patients in the Nantucket Island study followed for up to 5.2 years after initial antibiotic treatment had ever-climbing relapse rates. Relapse rates in patients receiving two weeks of IV Rocephin (ceftriaxone) could expect a relapse rate to exceed 50% after five years.

There is a smart way to treat this, yet few are nuanced in this skill.  We desperately need post-mortem studies to determine what is keeping people ill.  We need current transmission studies.  We need doctor education on the polymicrobial aspect of this disease. And, we need the stigma & polarization to go away so insurance companies will cover Lyme/MSIDS medical expenses, patients will be believed and supported and the bullying will end.