http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com/2019/01/17/uh-study-cat-scratch-disease-three-times-more-prevalent-hawaii-keiki-than-mainland-kids/

Cat scratch disease: It’s rare, but a UH study says Hawaii kids are more vulnerable

Cat scratch disease: It’s rare, but a UH study says Hawaii kids are more vulnerable
UH and Kapiolani doctors are warning about cat scratch disease.

Symptoms include fever and swollen lymph nodes. UH and Kapiolani Medical Center doctors studied 18 children who got severe reactions.

“These were children who had infections of their spleen, liver, meningitis, encephalitis. involvement of their eye. Some even developed bone lesions so it was a significant illness in these children,” said Dr. Jessica Kosut, a pediatric hospitalist.

Sarah Pacheco got a mild form of the illness years ago when her new kitten, Kipling, scratched her arm.

“I had just gotten a kitten and they play and you are bound to get scratched, but I noticed I lost my voice completely,” she said.

Cat scratch disease is still rare. Doctors think Hawaii’s humid climate, outdoor lifestyle and higher feral cat population could be partly to blame.

“I don’t think it’s cats that are in people’s homes, but it can be, but a couple of the children that we took care of described playing with cats that were out in the neighborhood and one child was hiding cats in his closet to keep them a secret from his mother,” said Dr. Kosut.

Doctors say cat scratch disease is treatable. Just make sure your cat doesn’t have fleas and doesn’t play with feral cats, and you don’t have to kick out your kitty.

“I’m definitely a fan of cats and I wouldn’t say that this should discourage anyone from getting cats or adopting cats. I just want providers to be aware of it,” said Dr. Johnson.

__________________
**Comment**
Cat Scratch Disease (CSD) or Bartonella IS NOT RARE!  And while some develop fever and swollen lymph nodes, it presents in a million different ways – some purely psychological.
And cats aren’t the only things transmitting it.

http://townsendletter.com/July2015/bartonellosis0715_3.html
Mode of Transmission: Arthropod vectors including fleas and flea feces, biting flies such as sand flies and horn flies, the human body louse, mosquitoes, and ticks; through bites and scratches of reservoir hosts; and potentially from needles and syringes in the drug addicted. Needle stick transmission to veterinarians has been reported. There is documentation that cats have received it through blood transfusion. 3.2% of blood donors in Brazil were found to carry Bartonella in their blood. Bartonella DNA has been found in dust mites. Those with arthropod exposure have an increased risk, as well as those working and living with pets that have arthropod exposure. 28% of veterinarians tested positively for Bartonella compared with 0% of controls. About half of all cats may be infected with Bartonella – as high as 80% in feral cats and near 40% of domestic cats. In various studies dogs have close to a 50% rate as well. Evidence now suggests it may be transmitted congenitally from mother to child – potentially leading to birth defects.

I’m glad they mentioned:
  • infections of their spleen & liver
  • meningitis
  • encephalitis
  • involvement of the eye
  • bone lesions
Because, these are the things crossing my desk on a daily basis.
Bartonella is prolific, tenacious, and can cause severe illness, and many LLMD’s consider it a major coinfection of Lyme.
To read more about the organism and successful treatments:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/01/03/bartonella-treatment/
For more:  
  • Heart involvement –
  • Eye involvement –
  • Neurological involvement –
https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/02/04/from-cat-scratch-disease-to-bartonellosis/  A table within this article states Bart can cause hallucinations.
  • Skull & bone infections
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19303175  Besides the case report of a woman with osteomyelitis, the study states a literature review identified 51 other cases of osteomyelitis associated with cat scratch disease, 14 of those confirmed by PCR.
  • Thoracic involvement –
  • Cancer

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2019/01/02/bartonella-langerhans-cell-histiocytosis-cancer/

  • Chronic abdominal pain, esophageal heartburn, purpuric skin rash, mesenteric adenitis (swollen lymph nodes inside the abdomen)   

https://www.lymediseaseassociation.org/images/NewDirectory/Studies-Papers/Fried_Bartonella-2002.pdf

  • Granulomas & bony lesions

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/07/05/cat-scratch-disease-in-a-1-5-year-old-girl-case-report/

  • Rheumatological involvement –

https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2018/05/09/rheumatological-presentation-of-bartonella-koehlerae-henselae-a-case-report-chiropractors-please-read/   Please note the joint popping with each articulation and continual joint subluxation issue.

  • Can turn off antibodies to Lyme, Babesia, Ehrlichia, Anaplasma, and even itself

http://www.townsendletter.com/July2009/ed_lyme0709.html  Dr. Shaller feels that due to this, Bartonella should be considered in ALL initial consults.

I’m going to stop at this point as I’m growing weary.  The question begs to be asked:
Does this look rare to you?