In a recent article by Dr. Mercola,  http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2017/07/25/chronic-wasting-disease.aspx?utm_source=dnl&utm_medium=email&utm_content=art3&utm_campaign=20170725Z1_UCM&et_cid=DM152228&et_rid=2092836335,  statistics reveal there is a a 117% increase in Wisconsin and an 85% increase in the U.S. of the human version of mad cow disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob, which is a contagious neurological disease caused by eating beef contaminated with brain, spinal cord or other central nervous system tissue from infected cattle.

Now the Canadian Government is warning that chronic wasting disease (CWD), a similar disease found in the deer family may jump to humans as well.  Both mad cow disease and chronic wasting disease cause transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE).

The deer family is also known to pick up hitchhiking ticks and carry them long distances.

This warning is due to a study which found CWD was transmitted to three out of five macaque monkeys infected with white tail deer meat.  There is also a systematic literature review showing CWD could also be transmitted to squirrel monkeys.

There is a potential for transmission to humans exposed to deer through diet, health products containing antler velvet, slaughter, velvet harvest, field dressing, preparing trophies and hunting lures.

The state of Wisconsin offers free CWD testing to hunters.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel states,

“Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR)] figures show that tens of thousands of hunters are killing deer in areas where CWD is prevalent and are not submitting them for testing. In 2016, in a CWD-prone area that the DNR describes as the southern farmland zone, 442 deer tested positive for disease out of 3,760 samples. More than 65,000 deer were killed in that zone and were not tested, according to DNR figures.”

Animals infected with CWD shed prions in saliva and urine and remain contagious for life and contaminate land and water.

Similar to Chronic Lyme Disease, CWD does not evoke a detectable immune response or inflammatory reaction. It is different; however, in that it is smaller than most viruses.  It also persists in the environment which is why animals raised in captivity are more likely to infect each other.  Avoid meat from those who force natural herbivores to eat animal parts (routine in concentrated feeding operations).

Researchers have also found an infectious protein (TDP-43) in Alzheimer’s patients is quite similar to prions in mad cow disease and CWD and was found in 200 of 340 autopsied brains of Alzheimer’s patients.  Patients with TDP-43 are 10 times more likely to have been cognitively impaired at death.

A 2005 study published in the journal Medical Hypotheses, stated:

“In the opinion of experts, ample justification exists for considering a similar pathogenesis for Alzheimer’s, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and the other spongiform encephalopathies such as Mad Cow disease. In fact, Creutzfeldt-Jakob and Alzheimer’s often coexist and at this point are thought to differ merely by time-dependent physical changes. A recent study links up to 13 percent of all ‘Alzheimer’s’ victims as really having Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.”

**Please have your meat tested.  It’s free and it may save your life.**