https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/06/170601124019.htm

Canadian researchers have discovered that minocycline, a common acne medication, can slow relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in those with initial symptoms.

Standard treatment costs for MS treatment in Canada range from $20,000 to $40,000 per year, with the cost tripled in the U.S.  Treatment using minocycline would cost about $600 per year.  

According to lead author, Dr. Luanne Metz, neurologists will be able to give mino to patients who have MRI results suggesting an MS cause and who are suffering with initial symptoms of demyelination.  

In the study, http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1608889 one group was given 100mg twice a day of minocycline while the other group was given a placebo.  Over six months there was a 27.6% reduction in full blown MS.  (Risk was 61% in placebo group and 33.4% in the mino group).

Minocycline has been used safely and effectively for over 30 years and has many anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, chelates calcium and is well-tolerated.  A Tetracycline drug that is bacteriostatic, it is widely used against both gram negative and gram positive pathogens including Rickettsia, Chlamydia, Plasmodium spp., and Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

Minocycline, as most Lyme/MSIDS patients know, is one of the most effective antibiotics which crosses the blood brain barrier, due to its high lipid solubility.  It is one of my personal favorites and the most effective drug for the excruciating occipital (base of the skull) headaches I get due to Tick-borne infections.  If you experience these, please read:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/04/02/chiari/ as brain infections can cause Chiari.

According to Spanish researchers, Minocycline is much more than just an antibiotic.  Minocycline far beyond an antibiotic  Not only is it antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory, it has also been shown to be neuroprotective, anti-apoptotic, and it inhibits proteolysis, angiogenesis and tumor metastasis.  Preclinical trials have shown it to inhibit malignant cell growth and activation and repletion of HIV, and  prevents bone resorption.  It has helped those with Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, ALS, Alzheimer’s, and spinal cord injury.  The link in blue demonstrates minos effectiveness against dermatitis, periodontal disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and CNS (central nervous system) pathologies, osteoporosis, and autism, as well as has potential to help atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and allergic asthma.  The researchers also feel mino is a rational treatment for neuropathic pain, something Lyme/MSIDS patients understand up close and personal.

Mino is inexpensive, has a known side-effect profile, and is well-absorbed (95-100%).  It, along with doxycycline, due to their ability to penetrate the cell wall, is commonly used for Lyme disease treatment:  https://madisonarealymesupportgroup.com/2016/02/13/lyme-disease-treatment/